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  1. Review of Heroic Shāktism: The Cult of Durgā in Ancient Indian Kingship. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (7):49-50.
    This reviewer had earlier had the misfortune of reviewing Sarah Jacoby's puerile book on Sera Khandro for Prabuddha Bharata. Jacoby had nearly made this reviewer puke. Same is the case with Bihani Sarkar's monograph. On the basis of this monograph she might win academic brownie points but it is a study which should have been dumped. The existence of the monograph is not only an insult to Hinduism and the Sanatana Dharma; it is technically wrong in its structuralist, iterative hermeneutics (...)
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  2. Part I: Why We Need to Revisit the Word of God – Preliminaries (Continued)...Conclusion to Hermenuetics.Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Indian Catholic Matters.
    This is the conclusion of the hermeneutical problems related to Biblical exegesis. This brief survey concludes with the problematics posed by Object-Oriented Ontology. The limitations of OOO is illustrated with examples from the Kashmiri Trika. Further, we interrogate the Biblical Fall and the story of Yama and Yami. This is part of an ongoing project of Biblical exegesis and this is just the third part of this project.
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  3. Hermeneutics, St. Augustine of Hippo & Tantra.Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2018
    In this 2nd part of the series on Tantra in this blog, we look at St. Augustine and the Postmoderns like Derrida and John Caputo to gradually frame a hermeneutics of Tantra.
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  4. Tripura Upanishad.Swami Narasimhananda - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (1):1-8.
    Tripura Upanishad is a minor Shakta or Tantra Upanishad explaining the structure of and meditation on Sri Chakra or Sri Yantra—a diagrammatic representation of the universe through nine interlocking triangles coming out of a central point. To date, there are two English translations of this Upanishad. The first and the earliest, by A G Krishna Warrier done in 1967, is a verse translation and because of the obvious constraints of such translation, fails to explain the intricacies and implied meanings of (...)
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  5. Review of Vijñāna Bhairava: The Manual for Self-Realization. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2012 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (8):429-30.
    This is a review of a classical text of Kashmiri Shaivism.
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  6. An Exposition and Defence of Jayanta Bhatta’s Inclusivism.David Slakter - 2011 - In David Cheetham, Ulrich Winkler, Oddbjørn Leirvik & Judith Gruber (eds.), Interreligious Hermeneutics in Pluralistic Europe: Between Texts and People. Brill. pp. 49-55.
    In the Āgamaḍambara (‘Much Ado About Religion’), Bhaṭṭa Jayanta presents an argument for an inclusivist approach to the problem of religious diversity, building upon some of the arguments given in his Nyāyamañjarī. Although his arguments are restricted to consideration of a form of Hinduism particular in time and place, I argue that Jayanta’s solution to the problem of religious diversity has wide-ranging relevance and some applicability to contemporary debates in the philosophy of religion. I consider possible pluralist objections to inclusivism, (...)
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  7. Tantra and Yoga: An Egg and the Hen Problem.Subhasis Chattopadhyay - unknown
    This is what Daniel Simpson has to say of it: An entertaining polemic that takes heartfelt swipes at Western scholars, accusing them of misreading Tantra. "Hinduism is Tantric in essence," the essay says, without proving that Tantra predates other influences, or that "Yoga in its various forms, arises out of Tantra". The latter seems at odds with the earliest descriptions of austerities, or the ascetic objective of bodily transcendence (which Tantric teachings later modified, as evinced by hatha yoga texts). Meanwhile, (...)
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