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  1. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  2. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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  3. The Philosophy of the Kyoto School.John Krummel - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Springer Publishing.
    This is an English translation of a book authored by Fujita Masakatsu. The main purpose of this book is to offer to philosophers and students abroad who show a great interest in Japanese philosophy and the philosophy of the Kyoto school major texts of the leading philosophers. This interest has surely developed out of a desire to obtain from the thought of these philosophers, who stood within the interstice between East and West, a clue to reassessing the issues of philosophy (...)
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  4. Japanese and Continental Philosophy. Conversations with the Kyoto School, Herausgegeben von Bret W. Davis, Brian Schroeder Und Jason Wirth. [REVIEW]Ralf Müller - 2011 - Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 36 (3).
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  5. The Kyoto School and the School of Consequent Eschatology.Friedrich Seifert - 1984 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 4:125.
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  6. The True Self in the Buddhist Philosophy of the Kyoto School.Fritz Buri & Harold H. Oliver - 1992 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:83.
  7. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century.John Maraldo - 2009 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
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  8. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations.Victor Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.) - 2008 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    The growing scholarship on the Kyoto School of Japanese Buddhist philosophy has brought it to the attention of more and more people in the West, but in the process, the Kyoto School has acquired a fixed identity. It is usually depicted as centered around three main figures—Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime and Nishitani Keiji—and concerned with the philosophy of nothingness. In fact, however, as the thirteen scholars in this volume show, the Kyoto School included several other members beside the inner circle (...)
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  9. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities.Bouso Raquel & W. Heisig James (eds.) - 2009 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
  10. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  11. Fortune de la philosophie cartésienne au Japon.Pierre Bonneels & Jaime Derenne (eds.) - 2017 - Paris: Classiques Garnier.
    Cet ouvrage propose un aperçu des recherches cartésiennes au Japon depuis l’époque d’Edo jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Il examine en outre la manière d’articuler la philosophie de Descartes, selon la modalité d’un in-sein philosophique, avec une pensée radicalement différente. / This work offers an overview of Cartesian research done in Japan from the Edo period to today. It also examines how to articulate Descartes’ philosophy - according to a philosophical In-Sein - with thought that is radically different. Table des matières: https://www.classiques-garnier.com/editions-tabmats/JeeMS01_tabmat.pdf.
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  12. Review of The Line of the Arch: Intercultural Issues Between Aesthetics and Ethics. [REVIEW]John Altmann - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:378-382.
  13. Translation of Tosaka Jun's "The Philosophy of the Kyoto School".Kenn Nakata Steffensen - 2016 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 8 (1):53-71.
    This translation of Tosaka Jun's “The Philosophy of the Kyoto School” is as unembellished as possible. As far as is known, this is the original statement of the philosophical nature and scope of the Kyoto School. Making it available in English serves the purpose of documenting how the Kyoto School was conceived, not only in terms of philosophical themes and approaches, but also in terms of who was included. Returning to the first written source reveals that Tosaka's views on both (...)
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  14. Becoming Bamboo: Western and Eastern Explorations of the Meaning of Life.Robert E. Carter - 1992 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The many problems we face in today's world -- among them war, environmental destruction, religious and racial intolerance, and inappropriate technologies -- demand that we carefully re-evaluate such issues as our relation to the environment, the nature of progress, ultimate purposes, and human values. These are all issues, Robert Carter explains, that are intimately linked to our perception of life's meaning. While many books discuss life's meaning either analytically or prescriptively, Carter addresses values and ways of meaningful living from a (...)
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  15. Contemporary Japanese Philosophy: A Reader.John W. M. Krummel - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This important volume introduces the reader to a variety of schools of thought. Ideal for classroom use, this is the ultimate resource for students and teachers of Japanese philosophy.
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  16. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy.Takeshi Morisato (ed.) - 2016 - Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications.
    The present volume is the latest example of what scholars of Japanese philosophy have been up to in recent years. The papers collected here, most of them presented at conferences held in Barcelona and Nagoya during 2016, have been arranged in four thematic parts. The first two parts cover the history of Japanese philosophy, as their topics extend from premodern thinkers to twentieth century philosophers; the last two parts focus on Nishida and Watsuji respectively.
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  17. Action Et Contemplation : Sur Une Lecture Eckhartienne de Shizuteru Ueda.Bouso Raquel - 2012 - Theologiques 20 (1-2):313-339.
    In 1923 Rudolf Otto gathered a number of appendices in Das Heilige (1917) in one of which he connected Zen Buddhism and the medieval mystic Meister Eckhart. The common denominator was life, as it lives without reason, lives because it lives, likewise the righteous man works for the sake of working and only then is genuinely free. When, in 1965 Shizuteru Ueda published his doctoral dissertation on Eckhart, he included a comparison with Zen returning to that topic. In light of (...)
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  18. La articulación de la realidad. Aproximación al lenguaje religioso desde el pensamiento japonés.Raquel Bouso - 2016 - Ideas Y Valores 65 (S2):17-29.
    On the basis of Lluís Duch’s idea that there is no specifically religious language, the article examines the kōan, a form of dialogue typical of Zen Buddhism used as a meditation technique and compiled in several written collections. Using the interpretations of the kōan carried out by some contemporary Japanese philosophers, the paper reflects on the expressive resources developed by Zen literature in order to account for the tension between the ineffability of the experience of an ultimate reality and the (...)
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  19. Inverse Correlation: Comparative Philosophy in an Upside Down World.T. Unno Mark - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):79--116.
    Kitarō Nishida introduces the concept of “inverse correlation‘ in his final work, The Logic of Place and the Religious Worldview, which he uses to illuminate the relation between finite and infinite, human and divine/buddha, such that the greater the realization of human limitation and finitude, the greater that of the limitless, infinite divine or buddhahood. This essay explores the applicability of the logic and rhetoric of inverse correlation in the cases of the early Daoist Zhuangzi, medieval Japanese Buddhist Shinran, and (...)
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  20. The Critique of Nishida Kitarō by Sōda Kiichirō: A Metaphysical Issue.Michel Dalissier - 2015 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):75-110.
    In 1927 Nishida Kitarô wrote a response to the critique of Sôda Kiichirô, represents an unprecedented occasion to rebuild, in a suggestive way, his "topological logic" –– an expression to be discussed in this paper ––, in particular concerning the quirks of a certain kind of metaphysics. More positively, it helps us to cast some light on his understanding of the history of German Philosophy since Kant. Taking this essay as a cornerstone, I would like to take the opportunity to (...)
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  21. A Metaphysical Dialogue Within the Kyōto School of Philosophy. Nishida Kitarō, Sōda Kiichirō, and Mutai Risaku.Michel Dalissier - 2016 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 13 (2):01-50.
    Nishida Kitarô’s is generally depicted as a philosopher of nothingness. In the present paper, I would like to discuss this suggestive but ambiguous characterization, starting the enquiry with the seminal essay he wrote in order to answer to the critique of his celebrated topological logic, by Sôda Kiichirô. Firstly, I focus on the last sections of Nishida’s essay, to make clear in what sense we can still speak of “being” within the frame of such an unfathomable logic of nothingness. In (...)
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  22. Philosophy on a Bridge.James W. Heisig - 2016 - In . pp. 257-270.
    The author takes a quick look back at his philosophical education and academic interests through the lens of »comparative philosophy« and uncovers a progression of cross-cultural and cross-historical patterns at work, many of them unfolding tacitly beneath the surface. He concludes with a brief listing of five such patterns, culminating in an appeal for a recovery of unified world views shaped within particular traditions but set against the universal backdrop of a common care for the earth.
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  23. The Self-Awareness of Evil in Pure Land Buddhism: A Translation of Contemporary Kyoto School Philosopher Keta Masako.Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, Jessica L. Main & Melanie Coughlin - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):192-201.
    Membership in the Kyoto School of philosophy is defined by both formal and conceptual criteria. Keta Masako 氣多雅子 is a member in good standing in both senses. Formally speaking, she currently occupies the Chair in Religious Studies at Kyoto University.1 This chair, together with the Chair in Philosophy, constitutes the formal nexus of the Kyoto School.2 Keta is the first woman to hold the chair, constellating her in a network that radiates “from the rather substantial circle of students and professors (...)
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  24. The Ontological Co-Emergence of 'Self and Other' in Japanese Philosophy. Y. Arisaka - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):197-208.
    The coupling of 'self and other' as well as the issues regarding intersubjectivity have been central topics in modern Japanese philosophy. The dominant views are critical of the Cartesian formulation, but the Japanese philosophers drew their conclusions also based on their own insights into Japanese culture and language. In this paper I would like to explore this theme in two of the leading modern Japanese philosophers - Kitaro Nishida and Tetsuro Watsuji. I do not make a causal claim that Japanese (...)
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  25. Review of The Cult of Nothingness: The Philosophers and the Buddha by Roger-Pol Droit; David Streight; Pamela Vohnson. [REVIEW]A. J. Nicholson - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):577-580.
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  26. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  27. Martin Heidegger’s Thinking and Japanese Philosophy and From Martin Heidegger’s Reply in Appreciation.Kōichi Tsujimura, Martin Heidegger & Richard Capobianco - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):349-357.
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  28. Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School. [REVIEW]Bradley Douglas Park - 2014 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2 (1):135-154.
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  29. The Significance of Japanese Philosophy.Masakatsu Fujita & Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
    When I deliver an introductory lecture on Japanese Philosophy, I always raise the following question: Is it appropriate to modify the word philosophy with an adjective such as Japanese? Philosophy is, after all, a discipline that addresses universal problems, and so transcends the restrictions implied in geographical descriptors. However, as Kuki Shūzō argues in his essay “Tokyo and Kyoto,” I think that this is only part, and not the whole truth of the matter.One’s thinking takes place within the framework of (...)
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  30. Opening Up the West.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):57-83.
    This essay aims to help prepare the way for those trained in Western philosophy to enter into dialogue with non-Western traditions of phi­losophy such as that of Japan. This will be done mainly by means of critical examination of some key instances of the ambivalence—the tension between the openings and closures—toward dialogue with non-Western traditions found throughout the history of Western phi­losophy. After tracing this ambivalence back to the Greeks, and to the figure of Socrates in particular, the essay focuses (...)
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  31. The Kyoto School and Confucianism: A Confucian Reading of the Philosophy of History and Political Thought of Masaaki Kosaka.Thomas Parry Rhydwen - unknown
    This dissertation examines the philosophy of Masaaki Kōsaka from the East Asian perspective of Confucianism, which I believe is the most appropriate moral paradigm for comprehending his political speculations. Although largely neglected in post-war scholarship, Kōsaka was a prominent member of the Kyoto School during the 1930s and 40s. This was a group of Japanese thinkers strongly associated with the philosophies of Kitarō Nishida and Hajime Tanabe. Kōsaka is now best known for his participation in the three Chūō Kōron symposia (...)
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  32. Review Of: Ng Yu-Kwan, The Philosophy of the Kyoto School: Hisamatsu Shin’Ichi. [REVIEW]Jun Su - 1997 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 24 (1-2):202-206.
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  33. Leibniz Y la Filosofía de la Religión En Nishida Kitarô.Z. Agustín Jacinto - 2016 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 57 (133):207-232.
    ABSTRACT This paper is an analysis of the manner Nishida Kitarô, in the process of construction of his own philosophy of religion, enters into dialogue with Leibniz's thought concerning Pre-established Harmony. Although the philosophy of religion is an important theme and Nishida goes back to Leibniz at some points in his textual career, there are relatively few studies that touch on the relationship between these two thinkers. I study Nishida's approach under three headings. The first section concerns ten main aspects (...)
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  34. On the Principle of Comparative East Asian Philosophy: Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2013 - National Central University Journal of Humanities 54:1-25.
    Recent research both on the Kyoto School and on the contemporary New Confucians suggests significant similarities between these two modern East Asian philosophies. Still missing is, however, an explanation of the shared philosophical ideas that serve as the foundation for comparative studies. For this reason, I analyze the basic theories of the two distinctly East Asian philosophies of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) and Mou Zongsan (1909-95) so as to identify and extract the same type of argument. This is an alternative to (...)
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  35. 「東アジアに哲学はない」のか:京都学派と新儒家 (The Problem of East Asian Philosophy: the Kyoto School and New Confucianism).Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten.
  36. Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School.Tomomi Asakura - 2015 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system with which the (...)
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  37. Levinas and Asian Thought.Leah Kalmanson, Frank Garrett & Sarah Mattice (eds.) - 2013 - Duquesne University Press.
    While influential works have been devoted to comparative studies of various Asian philosophies and continental philosophers such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Derrida, this collection is the first to fully treat the increased interest in intercultural and interdisciplinary studies related to the work of Emmanuel Levinas in such a context. Levinas and Asian Thought seeks to discover common ground between Levinas’s ethical project and various religious and philosophical traditions of Asia such as Mahāyāna Buddhism, Theravādic Buddhism, Vedism, Confucianism, Daoism, and (...)
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  38. Education and Empty Relationality: Thoughts on Education and the Kyoto School of Philosophy.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):639-654.
    This article builds on the growing literature on the Kyoto School of Philosophy and its influences on the field of Education. First, I argue that the influence of the Kyoto School of Philosophy is historically significant in Japan, and that the connection between this philosophical school and the philosophy of education is by no means superficial. Second, I suggest that this school contributes a unique view of ‘negative education’ founded in the philosophical idea of ‘nothingness’. I examine how this negative (...)
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  39. The Kyoto School: An Introduction.Robert E. Carter & Thomas P. Kasulis - 2013 - State University of New York Press.
    _An accessible discussion of the thought of key figures of the Kyoto School of Japanese philosophy._.
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  40. A Confucian Understanding of the Kyoto School's Wartime Philosophy.Thomas Rhydwen - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):69-78.
    In his new work on the Kyoto School David Williams presents the first “reading” in English of the complete text of the three Chūō Kōron symposia held by members of the second generation in the early 1940s. In addition, he provides an extensive commentary that explores the inability of “liberal history” to account for the political realities of wartime Japan and the “moral worldview” of the four symposists. Adopting the empirical methodology of earlier works, Williams proposes an alternative thesis of (...)
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  41. Auto-Éveil Et Témoignage – Philosopher Autrement : L’École de Kyoto En Comparaison Avec la Philosophie Française Post-Heideggérienne.Yasuhiko Sugimura - 2015 - Philosophie 126 (3):28.
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  42. Christianity and the Notion of Nothingness: Contributions to Buddhist-Christian Dialogue From the Kyoto School.Martin Repp & Jan van Bragt (eds.) - 2012 - Brill.
    The Christian philosopher Muto Kazuo contributed substantially to the predominantly Buddhist “Kyoto School of Philosophy.” Through critical exchange with its representatives, he opened up new perceptions of Christian faith, enabled mutual understanding between Buddhism and Christianity, and challenged the Western dialectical method.
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  43. Basho Nijåu Sekainai Sonzai.Shizuteru Ueda - 1992
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  44. The Buddha-Christ as the Lord of the True Self the Religious Philosophy of the Kyoto School and Christianity.Fritz Buri - 1997
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  45. Der Buddha-Christus Als der Herr des Wahren Selbst Die Religionsphilosophie der Kyoto-Schule Und Das Christentum.Fritz Buri - 1982
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  46. Space and History: Philosophy and Imperialism in Nishida and Watsuji.Yoko Arisaka - 1996 - Dissertation, University of California, Riverside
    This dissertation analyzes the philosophical theories and politics of Kitaro Nishida , the founder of modern Japanese philosophy, and Tetsuro Watsuji , the second most famous philosopher in Japan. Both Nishida and Watsuji develop a "spatialized" conception of history to contrast with a temporal model which had the effect of situating Europe as the most advanced form of modern culture. According to their view, the representation of world history should take into account the contemporaneous developments of all cultures. ;Positioning themselves (...)
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  47. Re-Politicising the Kyoto School as Philosophy. [REVIEW]Fabian Säfer - 2008 - Radical Philosophy 150.
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  48. Review Of: David Williams, Defending Japan's Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power. [REVIEW]James Heisig - 2005 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32 (1):163-166.
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  49. Review Of: James W. Heisig and John C. Maraldo, Eds., Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism. [REVIEW]Jamie Hubbard - 1996 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 23 (1-2):179-185.
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  50. Review Of: Ng Yu-Kwan, The Philosophy of Absolute Nothingness: An Introduction to the Philosophy of the Kyoto School. [REVIEW]Lam Keung - 1998 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 25 (3-4):399-402.
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