About this topic
Summary Latin American feminism encompasses a plurality of voices from various regions of Latin America.  This category encompasses writings  of Latin American feminisms as expressions of broader social  movements that include feminist concerns regarding gender oppression, political concerns regarding freedom of expression and possibility of democratization as well as popular concerns  associated with the needs of the most vulnerable women in the region.
Key works Key works in this category include  works by Ofelia Schutte:  Schutte 2011Schutte & Femenías 2009Schutte 1994. For an anthology that includes work on both U.S Latina Feminisms and Latin American Feminisms see Pitts et al 2020.
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  1. Translating Rosario Castellanos.Maurreen Ahern - forthcoming - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía.
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  2. Cultura e política nos movimentos sociais latino-americanos: novas leituras; Cultures of politics/Politics of cultures: re-visioning latin american social movements.Sonia E. Alvarez, Evelina Dagnino & Arturo Escobar - forthcoming - Humanitas.
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  3. The Promise of Manumission: Appropriations and Responses to the Notion of Emancipation in the Caribbean and South America in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century.Miguel Gualdrón Ramírez - 2024 - In Kris Sealey & Benjamin P. Davis (eds.), Creolizing Critical Theory: New Voices in Caribbean Philosophy. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 61-81.
    In this text, I consider two examples in the history of emancipation and manumission of enslaved, Black populations in the Caribbean and South America in order to theorize a colonial mode of conceiving of freedom at play in the first half of the nineteenth century. This mode is marked by the figure of the promise, enacting a notion of freedom as a constantly deferred, external compensation. Indeed, instead of an immediate decision deeming the practice of enslavement and trade of human (...)
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  4. Structural Trauma.Elena Ruíz - 2024 - Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 23 (1):29-50.
    This paper addresses the phenomenological experience of precarity and vulnerability in racialized gender-based violence from a structural perspective. Informed by Indigenous social theory and anti-colonial approaches to intergenerational trauma that link settler colonial violence to the modalities of stress-inducing social, institutional, and cultural violences in marginalized women’s lives, I argue that philosophical failures to understand trauma as a functional, organizational tool of settler colonial violence amplify the impact of traumatic experience on specific populations. It is trauma by design. I explore (...)
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  5. La Facultad: Towards Active Embodied Agency and an Embodied Epistemology.Karina Ortiz Villa - 2023 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 23:7-12.
    In this paper, I argue that Gloria Anzaldúa’s own philosophical concept of la facultad captures a form of active, embodied, epistemic agency. I further argue that when an agent uses la facultad, they acquire a novel form of knowledge, one that is only accessible through this capacity. In Section II, I define la facultad as consisting in the active integration of conscious self-awareness, bodily experiences, motor skills, and sensory information with the rational mind to engage with and navigate the world. (...)
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  6. Epistemological knots for a history of the resistances of Southern feminisms.Mariana Guerra Pérez & Mariana Alvarado - 2023 - Resistances. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (7):e230105.
    Este texto se sitúa en la juntura de los feminismos del sur que señalaron el encubrimiento de la heterogeneidad de las mujeres indo-afro-latino-americanas. Desde las cadencias y los ritmos de las voces de mujeres de Nuestra América cuyos saberes interrumpen, disrumpen e intervienen muestra que los problemas del feminismo blanco burgués del norte no son los de todas las mujeres puesto que algunas mujeres escapan a la fragilidad femenina que justifica el paternalismo y los micromachismos dentro y fuera de la (...)
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  7. Epistemic Oppression, Resistance, and Resurgence.Nora Berenstain, Kristie Dotson, Julieta Paredes, Elena Ruíz & Noenoe K. Silva - 2022 - Contemporary Political Theory 21 (2):283-314.
    Epistemologies have power. They have the power not only to transform worlds, but to create them. And the worlds that they create can be better or worse. For many people, the worlds they create are predictably and reliably deadly. Epistemologies can turn sacred land into ‘resources’ to be bought, sold, exploited, and exhausted. They can turn people into ‘labor’ in much the same way. They can not only disappear acts of violence but render them unnamable and unrecognizable within their conceptual (...)
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  8. The Contributions of Afro-descendant Women to Feminist Theory and Practice: Deuniversalizing the Subject “Women”.Ochy Curiel & Ruth Pión - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (3):478-492.
  9. Philosophy in Public Life in the Latin American and Latinx traditions: Mexico and Argentina.Sergio A. Gallegos-Ordorica - 2022 - In Lee C. McIntyre, Nancy Arden McHugh & Ian Olasov (eds.), A companion to public philosophy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 75-85.
    Latin American and Latinx philosophers have a long and rich history of deep engagement in public life through a variety of different projects and venues. This chapter offers a brief survey of the historical development and practice of philosophy in public life in Latin American and Latinx traditions. Because of their unique histories, it engages public philosophy in Mexico and Argentina separately. The chapter shows that a guiding thread in Argentinian public philosophy is a deep‐rooted concern about the threats created (...)
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  10. A Critique of Philosophical Shamanism.Joshua M. Hall - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):87-106.
    In this article, I critique two conceptions from the history of academic philosophy regarding academic philosophers as shamans, deriving more community-responsible criteria for any future versions. The first conception, drawing on Mircea Eliade’s Shamanism (1951), is a transcultural figure abstracted from concrete Siberian practitioners. The second, drawing on Chicana theorist Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera (1987), balances Eliade’s excessive abstraction with Indigenous American philosophy’s emphasis on embodied materiality, but also overemphasizes genetic inheritance to the detriment of environmental embeddedness. I therefore conclude (...)
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  11. An Intimate Trespass of Peregrina Chorines: Dancing with María Lugones and Saidiya Hartman.Joshua M. Hall - 2022 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 28 (2):96-122.
    A recent (2020) special issue in Critical Philosophy of Race dedicated to Maria Lugones illustrates and thematizes the continuing challenge of (re)constructing coalitions among Latina and Black feminists and their allies. As one proposed solution to this challenge, in their guest editors’ introduction to that special issue, Emma Velez and Nancy Tuana suggest an interpretive “dancing with” Lugones. Drawing on my own “dancing-with” interpretive method (which significantly predates that special issue), in the present article I choreograph an interpretive duet between (...)
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  12. For a Genealogy of Decolonial Feminism: Living Archives of a Movement.Agustin Lao-Montes - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (3):582-600.
    The three volumes I am considering in this review essay constitute a living archive of the political and epistemic movement called decolonial feminism. Together, Tejiendo de Otro Modo: Feminismo, Epistemología, y Apuestas Descoloniales en el Abya Yala, Feminismo Descolonial: Nuevos aportes metodológicos a mas de una década, and Decolonial Feminism in Abya Yala, collect the principal contributions to the profoundly important production of critical theory and radical politics. The editors and contributors include a diversity of key figures in decolonial feminism, (...)
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  13. Ethnocentrism and Coloniality in Latin American Feminisms: The Complicity and Consolidation of Hegemonic Feminists in Transnational Spaces.Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso & Lia Castillo Espinosa - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (3):498-509.
    This article applies the theses of Chandra Mohanty and Gayatri Spivak to Latin America in order to advance criticisms of discursive colonization by Western feminisms. It also provides an analysis “from within” to observe the coloniality of feminism in Latin America, denouncing its white-bourgeois origin and its collaboration with hegemonic Northern feminisms. It seeks to show how, since the 1990s, hegemonic feminism in Latin America has been complicit in projects of recolonization of the subcontinent by the central countries in the (...)
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  14. Decolonial Feminism in Abya Yala: Caribbean, Meso, and South American Contributions and Challenges.Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso, Maria Lugones & Nelson Maldonado-Torres (eds.) - 2022 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book provides an introduction to the key arguments in decolonial feminism, particularly, the coloniality of gender, the critique of white and Eurocentric feminisms, the imbrication between gender, race, and colonialism, feminicides, and the coloniality of democracy and public institutions.
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  15. Decolonial Feminism in Latin America: An Essential Anthology.Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso & Ruth Pión - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (3):470-477.
  16. Andean aesthetics and anticolonial resistance: a cosmology of unsociable bodies.Omar Rivera - 2022 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Informed by Gloria Anzaldúa's and José Carlos Mariátegui's work, as well as by Andean cosmology, Omar Rivera turns to Inka stonework and architecture as an example of a "Cosmological Aesthetics." He articulates ways of sensing, feeling and remembering that are attuned to an aesthetic of water, earth and light. On this basis, Rivera brings forth a corporeal orientation that can be inhabited by the oppressed, one that withdraws from predominant modern/Western conceptions of the human. By providing an aesthetic analysis of (...)
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  17. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - 2022 - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  18. Le féminisme décolonial en Abya Yala.Ochy Curiel & Priscilla De Roo - 2021 - Multitudes 84 (3):78-86.
    Les rapports sociaux de race, de genre, de sexe sont inextricablement mêlés : telle est une idée centrale du féminisme décolonial tel qu’il se déploie depuis Abya Yala, du nom que le peuple kuna donnait au continent américain. L’article situe l’importance de renommer les femmes et féministes d’origine autochtone, une manière de défaire les discours coloniaux (parfois tenus par des universitaires féministes) sur les pratiques de genre avant la colonialité/modernité. Ochy Curiel illustre cette idée à partir de l’expérience du GLEFAS (...)
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  19. Book review: Seeking Rights from the Left. Gender, Sexuality, and the Latin American Pink Tide. [REVIEW]Kathy Davis - 2021 - European Journal of Women's Studies 28 (2):282-284.
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  20. conflicto armado y el posacuerdo como motores del feminismo en Colombia.Laura Katherin Jiménez Cuadros, Jenny Carolina Martínez Wagner, Jimmy Esteban Moreno Rojas & Ángela Patricia Sánchez Castro - 2021 - Humanitas Hodie 3 (1):H31a2.
    ¿El conflicto armado ha transformado los roles de la mujer en Colombia? En este artículo se quiere evaluar la diversidad de escenarios y roles que las mujeres adquirieron durante el conflicto armado en Colombia. Para dirigir el rumbo de esta investigación y la posibilidad de evaluar alguno escenarios de posacuerdo, este texto se propone: realizar una consideración epistemológica por parte del feminismo latinoamericano que tenga en cuenta la pluralidad de relatos violentos en Latinoamérica analizar relatos de mujeres partícipes en la (...)
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  21. Reshaping Spirituality: Indigenous Decolonial Struggles for Justice in Mexico.Sylvia Marcos - 2021 - CLR James Journal 27 (1-2):67-79.
    Departing from Christian spiritualities, even those emerging from feminist theologians and Latin American eco feminist liberation theologies, the indigenous women´s movements started to propose their own “indigenous spirituality.” In some key meetings like the “First Summit of Indigenous Women of the Americas” and at other later meetings, their basic documents, final declarations, collective proposals have a spiritual component that departs from the influences of the largely Christian Catholic background of the country. Their discourses, demands, and live presentations have also expressed (...)
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  22. On Decolonizing Social Ontology and the Feminist Canon for Transnational Feminisms.Pedro Monque - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (1):127-141.
    Serene J. Khader’s Decolonizing Universalism presents a vision for how feminism might be decolonized for transnational work by doing without traditional Western feminist values and focusing instead on opposing sexist oppression. This paper presents a challenge to the idea that feminism consists in opposing sexist oppression, claiming that it instead consists in opposing gender oppression, where that includes combating cissexism and heterosexism. More specifically, it argues that critiquing cissexist criteria within gender categories as well as critiquing harms that follow from (...)
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  23. Wonder as Feminist Pedagogy: Disrupting Feminist Complicity with Coloniality.Laura Roberts & Fabiane Ramos - 2021 - Feminist Review 128 (1):28-43.
    This article documents our collaborative ongoing struggle to disrupt the reproduction of the coloniality of knowledge in the teaching of Gender Studies. We document how our decolonial feminist activism is actualised in our pedagogy, which is guided by feminist interpretations of ‘wonder’ (Irigaray, 1999; Ahmed, 2004; hooks, 2010) read alongside decolonial theory, including that of Ramón Grosfoguel, Walter D. Mignolo and María Lugones. Using notions of wonder as pedagogy, we attempt to create spaces in our classrooms where critical self-reflection and (...)
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  24. ‘We are not poor things’: territorio cuerpo-tierra and Colombian women’s organised struggles.Laura Rodriguez Castro - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (3):339-359.
    In this article, I use Lorena Cabnal’s notion of territorio cuerpo-tierra to analyse seventeen in-depth interviews with women leaders of rural social movements and other organisations in Colombia. In the interviews, social leaders condemn violence that is epistemic, systemic, militarised and that permeates all ambits of life. They denounce how the coloniality of power operates, while at the same time they propose alternatives for a better life from their own cosmovisions by enacting food sovereignty and constructing feminisms from ‘below’. I (...)
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  25. Extractivism and Territorial Dispossession in Rural Colombia: A Decolonial Commitment to Campesinas’ Politics of Place.Laura Rodriguez Castro - 2021 - Feminist Review 128 (1):44-61.
    Linked to extractive practices, territorial dispossession can be traced back to the colonisation of Abya Yala. From a decolonial commitment, this article complicates notions of dispossession and extractivism as merely emerging from war in Colombia and focuses on their presence in Campesinas territories. Based on the conceptualisations of the coloniality of power and coloniality of gender, I narrate how territorial dispossession and extractivism are felt in women’s ‘body-lands’ through foreign tourism/conservation development and new export crops in two rural veredas in (...)
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  26. Lugones's World-Making.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):199-211.
    This article reflects on the worlds that María Lugones has made and has transformed, particularly for the doing of feminist theory. Thus this article will be more exploratory than argumentative: to explore the lessons that Lugones's work holds, especially her work on pluralist feminism, world-traveling, the uses of anger, boomerang perception, and the multiplicitousness of both our selves and our communities, for our twenty-first-century challenges. This article argues that Lugones's work addresses how to negotiate conflicts that arise within social movements (...)
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  27. Decolonizing Feminist Theory: Latina Contributions to the Debate.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 11-28.
    This chapter suggests an approach to decolonial feminism drawing from Latina feminist theory and practice. Rejecting an imperial feminism involves something else besides “going local”: it requires a genuine reorientation of feminist theory toward the everyday. This chapter considers how this affects the central debates about gender identities and gender liberation. How might we approach gender questions in the context of learning from, rather than teaching, lo cotidiano of the impoverished? This would counter the popular accounts of identity formation that (...)
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  28. Latin America, Decoloniality, and Translation: Feminists Building Connectant Epistemologies.Claudia de Lima Costa - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 173-187.
    This chapter reflects on the feminist decolonial turn in Latin America by taking as its point of departure the debates on the coloniality of power and of gender. It analyzes how decolonial feminisms might unsettle hegemonic feminisms through the practice of translation—based not only on a linguistic paradigm, but more importantly, on an ontological one. In applying the notion of translation as equivocation, derived from Amerindian perspectivism, to discussions of the coloniality of gender, this chapter explores how some Latin American (...)
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  29. African, Latina, Feminist, and Decolonial: Marta Moreno Vega's Remembrance of Life in El Barrio in the 1950s.Theresa Delgadillo - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 157-170.
    This essay proposes that Marta Moreno Vega’s 2004 memoir, When the Spirits Dance Mambo, is a Latina feminist narrative that foregrounds African diaspora worldviews, thought, forms, and practices as resources for cultivating a path toward decoloniality. In this memoir, Abuela’s spiritual leadership and her introduction of the young Cotito into the practice of Espiritismo become a central prism through which Cotito innovatively apprehends the links between sacred and secular realms in the burgeoning mambo and salsa music scene of New York. (...)
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  30. Hallucinating Knowing: (Extra)ordinary Consciousness, More-Than-Human Perception, and Other Decolonizing Remedios within Latina and Xicana Feminist Theories.Pedro J. DiPietro - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 220-236.
    Through ancestral and submerged sensual repertoires, through healing practices, spoken word poetry, and other forms of psychic praxis, Latina and Xicana feminist theorizing resists the westernizing idioms of cognitive impairment. This chapter examines the ways that the coloniality of gender—as an injunction to inhabit heterosexualist, human-centered, notions of sanity—exclude Latina and Xicana experience and knowledge from the realm of cognitive accuracy. It suggests that heterosexualism creates conditions for hallucinations to arise within Latinx communities. Specifically, it explores healing traditions several centuries (...)
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  31. From Women's Movements to Feminist Theories (and Vice Versa).María Luisa Femenías - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 38-52.
    This chapter examines some of the substantial suggestions for antiessentialist practices that have emerged from the problematic prejudice against women’s rights. Exploring the idea of identity, as it is lived and resignified by Latin American women, offers us a set of significant ideas that provide different ways of signifying language and reality. The chapter attends critically to these ideas, confronting their historical and political contexts through decolonial thought, subalternity, and globalization. It denies an essentialist view of “identity,” appealing to the (...)
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  32. Philosophical Feminism in Latin America.Francesca Gargallo - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-122. Translated by Erika Grimm & Kevin Cedeño-Pacheco.
    This chapter offers a critical survey of feminism in Latin America, highlighting the contributions of prominent Latin American feminists in art, politics, and philosophy. The essay begins with a discussion of the pioneering feminist ideas of Juana Inés de la Cruz and their reception in Latin American feminist thought; and it continues with an elucidation of contemporary feminist critiques of the neoliberal paradigm of “multiculturalism.” The chapter also discusses how, around 1995, Latin American feminism became split in the academy: on (...)
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  33. Philosophical Feminism in Latin America.Francesca Gargallo - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-122.
  34. Deracializing Representations of Femininity and the Marketing of Latinidad: Zoe Saldana and L'Oréal's True Match Campaign.Carmen R. Lugo-Lugo & Mary K. Bloodsworth-Lugo - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 252-263.
    Latinidad has been explained as a process, a set of ideas, or a symbolic space, situating it between a mechanism and a locale. Regardless of its exact articulation or constitution, a central feature of Latinidad involves its standing as a social construct; that is, an idea born from and developed by forces through social interaction. This chapter focuses on Latinidad not only as an identity, but perhaps more importantly, as an embodied experience that is mediated or at times driven by (...)
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  35. Revisiting Gender: A Decolonial Approach.María Lugones - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 29-37.
    This chapter provides an analysis of the work of Rita Segato and María Lugones’s assessment of Segato’s approach to gender and questions of decoloniality. The chapter examines the concepts of “patriarchy” and “gender” from within several critical paradigms among communities of color, including, specifically, indigenous and Afro-descendant communities within Abya Yala (a Puna term for the geographic lands of the Americas). Lugones proposes that terms of analysis such as “patriarchy” and “gender” undermine the complexity of the relations of power constituted (...)
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  36. Gender and Universality in Colonial Methodology.María Lugones - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):25-47.
    This article offers a decolonial methodology that questions the universality tied to the concept of gender. While not questioning that the modern/colonial capitalist gender system is an oppressive, variable, systemic organization of power, it argues that it is not universal; that is, that not all peoples organize their relations in terms of and on the grounds of gender. Its aim is to offer a decolonial methodology to both study colonized people who live at the colonial difference, but also to engage (...)
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  37. From Gender to Omeotlization: Toward a Decolonial Ontology.Susana E. Matallana-Peláez - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):373-392.
    This article examines the treatment of gender and the woman question in the ongoing Latin American decolonial debate. More specifically, it traces how the Zapatistas and other indigenous movements as well as some of the main mestizo male voices in this debate have endeavored to frame these issues and the criticism they have received from María Lugones and other decolonial feminists. It then points to some of the limitations in Lugones's own approach, and in a final stream of discussion, it (...)
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  38. Complex Communication and Decolonial Struggles: The Forging of Deep Coalitions through Emotional Echoing and Resistant Imaginations.José Medina - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):212-236.
    This article elucidates and expands on María Lugones's account of complex communication across liminal sites as the basis for deep coalitions among oppressed groups. The analysis underscores the crucial role that emotions and resistant imaginations play in complex communication and world-traveling across liminal sites. In particular, it focuses on the role of emotional echoing and epistemic activism in complex forms of communication among oppressed subjects. It elucidates Gloria Anzaldúa's storytelling and Doris Salcedo's visual art as exemplary forms of epistemic activism (...)
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  39. Decolonial Feminist Movidas: A Caribeña (Re)thinks "Privilege," the Wages of Gender, and Building Complex Coalitions.Xhercis Méndez - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 74-94.
    This chapter examines the set of relational dynamics that produce the “wages of gender,” namely the economic, social, political, and psychological “privileges”/“benefits” one gets from identifying with, aspiring to, and manifesting dominant racialized and heteronormative conceptions of sex/gender. Rather than frame the benefits reserved for heterosexual, middle-class, white females as “privileges” and emphasize women of color’s systematic exclusion from those “privileges,” it instead homes in on the inextricable relational and intimate violence woven into those “privileges.” Building on the political work (...)
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  40. Decolonial Theories in Comparison.Breny Mendoza - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):43-60.
    The article examines the theories of decolonization that have originated in the north of the Americas and Oceania and Latin America. It compares settler colonial theories developed by Australian historians Patrick Wolfe and Lorenzo Veracini with the theory of the coloniality of power of the Peruvian sociologist Aníbal Quijano. The author argues that Wolfe’s and Veracini’s theory of settler colonialism creates a conceptual distancing from what they call exploitation colonialism that is not only theoretically unsound, but also historically inaccurate. The (...)
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  41. "Remaking Human Being": Loving, Kaleidoscopic Consciousness in Helena María Viramontes's Their Dogs Came with Them.Paula M. L. Moya - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 135-156.
    In “Remaking Human Being,” the author enumerates the decolonial elements of Helena María Viramontes’s novel Their Dogs Come with Them to illustrate the importance of literature and literary criticism for a decolonial project. After defining decoloniality, the essay shows that Viramontes structures her narrative and personifies her characters to reveal the socioeconomic and ideological forces that keep Latinx and other people of color in conditions of subordination. Moreover, Viramontes’s pluralized and digressive narrative structure, together with a faithful witnessing of her (...)
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  42. Enrique Dussel's Etica de la liberacíon, US Women of Color Decolonizing Practices, and Coalitionary Politics amid Difference.Laura E. Pérez - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 53-73.
    As a US woman of color and queer-centered critique, this chapter analyses coalitionary attempts that merely list oppressions yet reproduce them in their own failure to seriously engage the thought emanating from marginalized intellectuals, even within Third World and US people-of-color communities. To take seriously knowledge from negatively racialized and gendered US women of color is to engage that important bibliography/body of thought but also to examine and transform oneself. The essay specifically argues for recognition of the historic decolonial analyses (...)
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  43. Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance.Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together many prominent philosophical voices today focusing on issues of U. S. Latinx and Latin American identities and feminist theory. As such, the essays collected here highlight the varied and multidimensional aspects of gender, racial, cultural, and sexual questions impacting U.S. Latinx and Latin American communities today. The collection also highlights a number of important threads of analysis from fields as diverse as disability studies,aesthetics, literary theory, and pop culture studies.
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  44. Compelled to Cross, Tempted to Master: Affective Challenges in Lugones's Decolonial Feminist Methodology.Shireen Roshanravan - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):119-133.
    This article explores the affective challenges of María Lugones's coalitional imperative of decolonial feminism as it requires sustaining painful confrontations for acting in complicity with the very oppressions the aspiring decolonial feminist may have believed herself to be entirely against. Because the coalitional crossings necessary to Lugones's decolonial feminist methodology involves moving toward discomfort out of a sense of responsibility, the decolonial feminist may be tempted toward mastery of radical performance rather than self-transformation. As a possible way out of this (...)
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  45. Cultural Gaslighting.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):687-713.
    This essay frames systemic patterns of mental abuse against women of color and Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America) in terms of larger design-of-distribution strategies in settler colonial societies, as these societies use various forms of social power to distribute, reproduce, and automate social inequalities (including public health precarities and mortality disadvantages) that skew socio-economic gain continuously toward white settler populations and their descendants. It departs from traditional studies in gender-based violence research that frame mental abuses such as gaslighting--commonly (...)
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  46. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
  47. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - In Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
    This essay addresses structural violence against Latinas by looking at the existential toll different forms of cultural violence take on us. In particular, it looks at linguistic violence and the role lesser-known violences play in the intergenerational continuation of colonial violence, such as hermeneutic violence. Defined as violence done to systems of meaning and interpretation, hermeneutic violence is discussed at length in relation to the experience of harm and injury. The essay further explores some resistant epistemic practices Latina feminists have (...)
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  48. Border Zones, in-Between Spaces, and Turns: On Lugones, the Coloniality of Gender, and the Diasporic Peregrina.Ofelia Schutte - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):102-118.
    This article considers María Lugones's work in Pilgrimages/Peregrinajes, especially her association of the fragmented self with modernity, in order to understand the existential grounds of what she calls an impure, perceptually aware, mestizaje. It suggests that the impure Latina self validated thereby may be seen retrospectively as the forerunner of the decolonial feminist self who unveils the coloniality of gender analysis. Noting some discrepancies between them, the article questions whether Lugones's use of Quijano's world systems theory leads to an overdetermining (...)
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  49. Trajetórias biográficas de mulheres feministas atuantes em movimentos sociais.Márcia Alves Silva & Adriana Lessa Cardoso - 2020 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 25:294-307.
    O artigo busca refletir sobre a trajetória de mulheres feministas na cidade de Pelotas – RS, a partir de suas narrativas que, de certa forma, foram precursoras, visibilizando suas experiências no ativismo político. Entendemos que todo movimento social atua na formação humana, portanto, é um ato educativo. Utilizamos o referencial feminista descolonial, como perspectiva vinculada à resistência do sistema capitalista mundial-globalizado. Buscamos nossas bases teóricas especialmente nas autoras Heleieth Saffioti, Ochy Curiel, Marcela Lagarde y de los Ríos, Patricia Hill Collins (...)
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  50. Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mexican Genealogy: From Pelados and Pachucos to New Mestizas.Alexander Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Genealogy 4 (1).
    This essay examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of two Mexican philosophers in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera: Samuel Ramos and Octavio Paz. We argue that although neither of these authors is cited in her seminal work, Anzaldúa had them both in mind through the writing process and that their ideas are present in the text itself. Through a genealogical reading of Borderlands/La Frontera, and aided by archival research, we demonstrate how Anzaldúa’s philosophical vision of the “new mestiza” is a critical (...)
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