About this topic
Summary Latin American feminism encompasses a plurality of voices from various regions of Latin America.  This category encompasses writings  of Latin American feminisms as expressions of broader social  movements that include feminist concerns regarding gender oppression, political concerns regarding freedom of expression and possibility of democratization as well as popular concerns  associated with the needs of the most vulnerable women in the region.
Key works Key works in this category include  works by Ofelia Schutte:  Schutte 2011Schutte & Femenías 2010Schutte 1994.
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204 found
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  1. Translating Rosario Castellanos.Maurreen Ahern - forthcoming - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía.
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  2. Cultura E Política Nos Movimentos Sociais Latino-Americanos: Novas Leituras; Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Re-Visioning Latin American Social Movements.Sonia E. Alvarez, Evelina Dagnino & Arturo Escobar - forthcoming - Humanitas.
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  3. A Critique of Philosophical Shamanism.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - The Pluralist.
    In this article, I critique two conceptions from the history of academic philosophy regarding academic philosophers as shamans, deriving more community-responsible criteria for any future versions. The first conception, drawing on Mircea Eliade’s Shamanism (1951), is a transcultural figure abstracted from concrete Siberian practitioners. The second, drawing on Chicana theorist Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera (1987), balances Eliade’s excessive abstraction with Indigenous American philosophy’s emphasis on embodied materiality, but also overemphasizes genetic inheritance to the detriment of environmental embeddedness. I therefore conclude (...)
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  4. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  5. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
  6. Structural Trauma.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 20 (2):Volume 22, no.2.
    This paper addresses the phenomenological experience of precarity and vulnerability in racialized gender-based violence from a structural perspective. Informed by Indigenous social theory and anti-colonial approaches to intergenerational trauma that link settler colonial violence to the modalities of stress-inducing social, institutional, and cultural violences in marginalized women’s lives, I argue that philosophical failures to understand trauma as a functional, organizational tool of settler colonial violence amplify the impact of traumatic experience on specific populations. It is trauma by design. I explore (...)
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  7. Contar Histórias Desde Aqui.Bruna Moraes Battistelli & Luciana Rodrigues - 2021 - Quaestio - Revista de Estudos Em Educação 23 (1):153-173.
    Como escreve Scholastique Mukasonga em seu livro “A mulher de pés descalços”, precisamos ensinar aos nossos dedos dos pés um caminhar que não os machuque pelo percurso. Inspiradas por essa proposição, esse trabalho busca tecer diálogos com os ensinamentos de intelectuais como bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldúa e Lélia Gonzalez para pensarmos uma sala de aula e uma docência pautadas em uma ética feminista e antirracista. Assim, situadas desde o continente amefricano, objetivamos, a partir de nossas experiências e de (...)
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  8. Epistemic Oppression, Resistance, and Resurgence.Nora Berenstain, Kristie Dotson, Julieta Paredes, Elena Ruíz & Noenoe K. Silva - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory:1-32.
    Epistemologies have power. They have the power not only to transform worlds, but to create them. And the worlds that they create can be better or worse. For many people, the worlds they create are predictably and reliably deadly. Epistemologies can turn sacred land into ‘resources’ to be bought, sold, exploited, and exhausted. They can turn people into ‘labor’ in much the same way. They can not only disappear acts of violence but render them unnamable and unrecognizable within their conceptual (...)
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  9. Decolonizing Feminist Theory: Latina Contributions to the Debate.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 11-28.
    This chapter suggests an approach to decolonial feminism drawing from Latina feminist theory and practice. Rejecting an imperial feminism involves something else besides “going local”: it requires a genuine reorientation of feminist theory toward the everyday. This chapter considers how this affects the central debates about gender identities and gender liberation. How might we approach gender questions in the context of learning from, rather than teaching, lo cotidiano of the impoverished? This would counter the popular accounts of identity formation that (...)
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  10. Embodied Genealogies: Anzaldúa, Nietzsche, and Diverse Epistemic Practice.Natalie Cisneros - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 188-203.
    This chapter shows how Friedrich Nietzsche’s work on genealogy can be read critically and strategically alongside Gloria Anzaldúa’s thought to develop a conception of “embodied genealogy” as a mode of critical, historical, and transformative philosophical practice. Anzaldúa’s thought resonates with Nietzsche’s conception of genealogy, a method of philosophical practice that sheds critical light on dominant ways of knowing by calling into question assumptions about historical necessity and rational progress. Reading Anzaldúa’s work through this lens sheds light on her contributions to (...)
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  11. Latin America, Decoloniality, and Translation: Feminists Building Connectant Epistemologies.Claudia de Lima Costa - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 173-187.
    This chapter reflects on the feminist decolonial turn in Latin America by taking as its point of departure the debates on the coloniality of power and of gender. It analyzes how decolonial feminisms might unsettle hegemonic feminisms through the practice of translation—based not only on a linguistic paradigm, but more importantly, on an ontological one. In applying the notion of translation as equivocation, derived from Amerindian perspectivism, to discussions of the coloniality of gender, this chapter explores how some Latin American (...)
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  12. African, Latina, Feminist, and Decolonial: Marta Moreno Vega's Remembrance of Life in El Barrio in the 1950s.Theresa Delgadillo - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 157-170.
    This essay proposes that Marta Moreno Vega’s 2004 memoir, When the Spirits Dance Mambo, is a Latina feminist narrative that foregrounds African diaspora worldviews, thought, forms, and practices as resources for cultivating a path toward decoloniality. In this memoir, Abuela’s spiritual leadership and her introduction of the young Cotito into the practice of Espiritismo become a central prism through which Cotito innovatively apprehends the links between sacred and secular realms in the burgeoning mambo and salsa music scene of New York. (...)
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  13. Hallucinating Knowing: (Extra)Ordinary Consciousness, More-Than-Human Perception, and Other Decolonizing Remedios Within Latina and Xicana Feminist Theories.Pedro J. DiPietro - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 220-236.
    Through ancestral and submerged sensual repertoires, through healing practices, spoken word poetry, and other forms of psychic praxis, Latina and Xicana feminist theorizing resists the westernizing idioms of cognitive impairment. This chapter examines the ways that the coloniality of gender—as an injunction to inhabit heterosexualist, human-centered, notions of sanity—exclude Latina and Xicana experience and knowledge from the realm of cognitive accuracy. It suggests that heterosexualism creates conditions for hallucinations to arise within Latinx communities. Specifically, it explores healing traditions several centuries (...)
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  14. From Women's Movements to Feminist Theories (and Vice Versa).María Luisa Femenías - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 38-52.
    This chapter examines some of the substantial suggestions for antiessentialist practices that have emerged from the problematic prejudice against women’s rights. Exploring the idea of identity, as it is lived and resignified by Latin American women, offers us a set of significant ideas that provide different ways of signifying language and reality. The chapter attends critically to these ideas, confronting their historical and political contexts through decolonial thought, subalternity, and globalization. It denies an essentialist view of “identity,” appealing to the (...)
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  15. Philosophical Feminism in Latina America.Francesca Gargallo - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 97-122.
    This chapter offers a critical survey of feminism in Latin America, highlighting the contributions of prominent Latin American feminists in art, politics, and philosophy. The essay begins with a discussion of the pioneering feminist ideas of Juana Inés de la Cruz and their reception in Latin American feminist thought; and it continues with an elucidation of contemporary feminist critiques of the neoliberal paradigm of “multiculturalism.” The chapter also discusses how, around 1995, Latin American feminism became split in the academy: on (...)
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  16. Deracializing Representations of Femininity and the Marketing of Latinidad: Zoe Saldana and L'Oréal's True Match Campaign.Carmen R. Lugo-Lugo & Mary K. Bloodsworth-Lugo - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 252-263.
    Latinidad has been explained as a process, a set of ideas, or a symbolic space, situating it between a mechanism and a locale. Regardless of its exact articulation or constitution, a central feature of Latinidad involves its standing as a social construct; that is, an idea born from and developed by forces through social interaction. This chapter focuses on Latinidad not only as an identity, but perhaps more importantly, as an embodied experience that is mediated or at times driven by (...)
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  17. Revisiting Gender: A Decolonial Approach.María Lugones - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 29-37.
    This chapter provides an analysis of the work of Rita Segato and María Lugones’s assessment of Segato’s approach to gender and questions of decoloniality. The chapter examines the concepts of “patriarchy” and “gender” from within several critical paradigms among communities of color, including, specifically, indigenous and Afro-descendant communities within Abya Yala (a Puna term for the geographic lands of the Americas). Lugones proposes that terms of analysis such as “patriarchy” and “gender” undermine the complexity of the relations of power constituted (...)
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  18. From Gender to Omeotlization: Toward a Decolonial Ontology.Susana E. Matallana-Peláez - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):373-392.
    This article examines the treatment of gender and the woman question in the ongoing Latin American decolonial debate. More specifically, it traces how the Zapatistas and other indigenous movements as well as some of the main mestizo male voices in this debate have endeavored to frame these issues and the criticism they have received from María Lugones and other decolonial feminists. It then points to some of the limitations in Lugones's own approach, and in a final stream of discussion, it (...)
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  19. Decolonial Feminist Movidas: A Caribeña (Re)Thinks "Privilege," the Wages of Gender, and Building Complex Coalitions.Xhercis Méndez - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 74-94.
    This chapter examines the set of relational dynamics that produce the “wages of gender,” namely the economic, social, political, and psychological “privileges”/“benefits” one gets from identifying with, aspiring to, and manifesting dominant racialized and heteronormative conceptions of sex/gender. Rather than frame the benefits reserved for heterosexual, middle-class, white females as “privileges” and emphasize women of color’s systematic exclusion from those “privileges,” it instead homes in on the inextricable relational and intimate violence woven into those “privileges.” Building on the political work (...)
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  20. Decolonial Theories in Comparison.Breny Mendoza - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):43-60.
    The article examines the theories of decolonization that have originated in the north of the Americas and Oceania and Latin America. It compares settler colonial theories developed by Australian historians Patrick Wolfe and Lorenzo Veracini with the theory of the coloniality of power of the Peruvian sociologist Aníbal Quijano. The author argues that Wolfe’s and Veracini’s theory of settler colonialism creates a conceptual distancing from what they call exploitation colonialism that is not only theoretically unsound, but also historically inaccurate. The (...)
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  21. Vulnerable Bodies: Juana Alicia's Latina Feminism and Transcorporeal Environmentalism.Julie Avril Minich - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 281-292.
    This essay examines how the Chicana feminist muralist Juana Alicia fosters environmental justice activism that values vulnerable lives in her two most famous murals, both painted at Twenty-Fourth and York Streets in San Francisco’s Mission District: Las Lechugueras (1983) and La Llorona’s Sacred Waters (2004). It explores how Juana Alicia gives visual form to an environmental ethics that prompts a politics of inclusion, equitable resource distribution, and bodily diversity. Juana Alicia’s murals remind us what antiracist, feminist, disability, environmental, and other (...)
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  22. "Remaking Human Being": Loving, Kaleidoscopic Consciousness in Helena María Viramontes's Their Dogs Came with Them.Paula M. L. Moya - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 135-156.
    In “Remaking Human Being,” the author enumerates the decolonial elements of Helena María Viramontes’s novel Their Dogs Come with Them to illustrate the importance of literature and literary criticism for a decolonial project. After defining decoloniality, the essay shows that Viramontes structures her narrative and personifies her characters to reveal the socioeconomic and ideological forces that keep Latinx and other people of color in conditions of subordination. Moreover, Viramontes’s pluralized and digressive narrative structure, together with a faithful witnessing of her (...)
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  23. Cámara Queer: Longing, the Photograph, and Queer Latinidad.Mariana Ortega - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 264-280.
    This essay examines photographic representations of queer Latinidad. A longing to discover a photographic history of Latina lesbian desire prompts a discussion of queerness in the context of Latinx love, sexuality, and desire. By way of examples of photographic representations, queer Latinidad is presented as complex and capable of encompassing paradoxical but expansive, nondichotomous understandings of sexuality and of gender presentation. Such photographic representations also allow for disidentifications that introduce the possibility of desires that cut across races and racism. Following (...)
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  24. Enrique Dussel's Etica de la Liberacíon, US Women of Color Decolonizing Practices, and Coalitionary Politics Amid Difference.Laura E. Pérez - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 53-73.
    As a US woman of color and queer-centered critique, this chapter analyses coalitionary attempts that merely list oppressions yet reproduce them in their own failure to seriously engage the thought emanating from marginalized intellectuals, even within Third World and US people-of-color communities. To take seriously knowledge from negatively racialized and gendered US women of color is to engage that important bibliography/body of thought but also to examine and transform oneself. The essay specifically argues for recognition of the historic decolonial analyses (...)
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  25. Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance.Andrea J. Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together many prominent philosophical voices today focusing on issues of U. S. Latinx and Latin American identities and feminist theory. As such, the essays collected here highlight the varied and multidimensional aspects of gender, racial, cultural, and sexual questions impacting U.S. Latinx and Latin American communities today. The collection also highlights a number of important threads of analysis from fields as diverse as disability studies,aesthetics, literary theory, and pop culture studies.
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  26. Stylized Resistance: Boomerang Perception and Latinas in the Twenty-First Century.Stephanie Rivera Berruz - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 239-251.
    The chapter explores the perceptual and epistemic structures of boomerang perception, as developed by María Lugones, by focusing on contemporary lived experiences of Latinas of commercialization and homogenization. Boomerang perception is the mechanism through which people of color are constructed through a white imaginary lens and denied subjectivity. The internalization of boomerang perception subsequently yields horizontal hostilities whereby people of color construct each other through white eyes and engender a fake/real dichotomy that polices the boundaries of communities. The commercialization of (...)
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  27. Cultural Gaslighting.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):687-713.
    This essay frames systemic patterns of mental abuse against women of color and Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America) in terms of larger design-of-distribution strategies in settler colonial societies, as these societies use various forms of social power to distribute, reproduce, and automate social inequalities (including public health precarities and mortality disadvantages) that skew socio-economic gain continuously toward white settler populations and their descendants. It departs from traditional studies in gender-based violence research that frame mental abuses such as gaslighting--commonly (...)
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  28. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Flores Ruíz - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 204-219.
    This essay addresses structural violence against Latinas by looking at the existential toll different forms of cultural violence take on us. In particular, it looks at linguistic violence and the role lesser-known violences play in the intergenerational continuation of colonial violence, such as hermeneutic violence. Defined as violence done to systems of meaning and interpretation, hermeneutic violence is discussed at length in relation to the experience of harm and injury. The essay further explores some resistant epistemic practices Latina feminists have (...)
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  29. Crossroads and In-Between Spaces: A Meditation on Anzaldúa and Beyond.Ofelia Schutte - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 123-134.
    The essay focuses on Gloria Anzaldúa’s narrative of overcoming shame in Borderlands/La Frontera. It addresses the question of coming to terms with multiple conditions of oppression obstructing the creative agency of radical Latina subjects. The discussion occurs along two intersecting planes: (1) the existential question of self-knowledge as the self undergoes the difficult process of identifying and releasing the weight of past oppressions and (2) the situated character of Anzaldúa’s Chicana/Latina condition in light of the heteronormative and epistemic constraints she (...)
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  30. Trajetórias biográficas de mulheres feministas atuantes em movimentos sociais.Márcia Alves Silva & Adriana Lessa Cardoso - 2020 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 25:294-307.
    O artigo busca refletir sobre a trajetória de mulheres feministas na cidade de Pelotas – RS, a partir de suas narrativas que, de certa forma, foram precursoras, visibilizando suas experiências no ativismo político. Entendemos que todo movimento social atua na formação humana, portanto, é um ato educativo. Utilizamos o referencial feminista descolonial, como perspectiva vinculada à resistência do sistema capitalista mundial-globalizado. Buscamos nossas bases teóricas especialmente nas autoras Heleieth Saffioti, Ochy Curiel, Marcela Lagarde y de los Ríos, Patricia Hill Collins (...)
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  31. La Mexicana En la Chicana: The Mexican Sources of Gloria Anzalduá's Inter-American Philosophy.Alexander Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 1 (11):44-62.
    This article examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of Mexican philosophical sources, especially in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera. We argue that Anzaldúa effectively contributed to la filosofía de lo mexicano by developing an Inter-American Philosophy of Mexicanness. More specifically, we recover “La Mexicana en la Chicana” by paying careful attention to Anzaldúa’s Mexican sources, both those she explicitly cites and those we have discovered while conducting archival research using the Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa Papers at the Benson Latin American Collection at (...)
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  32. Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mexican Genealogy: From Pelados and Pachucos to New Mestizas.Alexander Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Genealogy 4 (1).
    This essay examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of two Mexican philosophers in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera: Samuel Ramos and Octavio Paz. We argue that although neither of these authors is cited in her seminal work, Anzaldúa had them both in mind through the writing process and that their ideas are present in the text itself. Through a genealogical reading of Borderlands/La Frontera, and aided by archival research, we demonstrate how Anzaldúa’s philosophical vision of the “new mestiza” is a critical (...)
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  33. Toward Decolonial Feminisms: Tracing the Lineages of Decolonial Thinking Through Latin American/Latinx Feminist Philosophy.Emma D. Velez & Nancy Tuana - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):366-372.
  34. Mestiza Consciousness.Elena Ruíz - 2019 - In Gail Weiss, Ann V. Murphy & Gayle Salamon (eds.), Fifty Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
  35. Writing to Be Heard: Recovering the Philosophy of Luisa Capetillo.Stephanie Rivera Berruz - 2018 - Essays in Philosophy 19 (1):17-34.
    Luisa Capetillo has been heralded as the first feminist writer of Puerto Rico. She authored four books and embodied her emancipatory philosophical commitments, but has received scant philosophical attention. In this paper I recover the philosophy of Capetillo as part of a Latin American and Caribbean philosophical tradition centered on radical praxis places sexuality at the centerfold of class politics. At the intersection between gender equity and class emancipation Capetillo advocated for the liberatory possibilities of education, which served as the (...)
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  36. Spivak and Rivera Cusicanqui on the Dilemmas of Representation in Postcolonial and Decolonial Feminisms.Kiran Asher - 2017 - Feminist Studies 43 (3):512.
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  37. Building Transnational Feminist Solidarity Networks.Sergio A. Gallegos - 2017 - In Margaret McLaren (ed.), Decolonizing Feminism. London: Rowman and Littlefield International. pp. 231-256.
  38. Latin American Decolonial Studies: Feminist Issues.Sandra Harding - 2017 - Feminist Studies 43 (3):624.
  39. Coloniality at Work: Decolonial Critique and the Postfeminist Regime.Isis Giraldo - 2016 - Feminist Theory 17 (2):157-173.
    In this article I address the imbalance in the production and circulation of knowledge in the dominant Anglo-American academic circuit, aiming to make visible feminist work in a decolonial vein carried out in Latin America, to recentre the decolonial option with regard to established postcolonial studies and to propose a way of understanding global postfeminist female subjectivity as mediated in mass media. The decolonial option offers a rich theoretical toolbox for exploring contemporary junctions of gender, race and the question of (...)
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  40. Carlos Alberto Sánchez: Contingency and Commitment: Mexican Existentialism and the Place of Philosophy: State University of New York Press, Albany, 2016, 161 Pp, ISBN 9781438459455. [REVIEW]Andrea J. Pitts - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (4):645-652.
  41. Sexualidad y mujer en la filosofía: ¿amor como signo trascendente? Acercamiento a las diosas madres en América Latina.Rosa Emilia del Pilar Alcayaga Toro - 2015 - Cuadernos de Filosofía Latinoamericana 36 (113):25.
    Preguntarse si desde un orden patriarcal, en esta búsqueda de sentido, que no acaba, el concepto de Amor no será un nuevo signo trascendente en reemplazo o resurrección del último Dios. Amor como uno de los pocos rasgos de trascendencia en esta civilización tecnológica que, en tanto, virtud del sometimiento, el genio del cristianismo enlaza a la mujer en la red de la lógica cristiana regida por dos dogmas de la fe: la ‘Encarnación’ y el ‘Amor’ e impone la exclusión (...)
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  42. Religião e feminismo descolonial: os protagonismos e os novos agenciamentos religiosos das mulheres no século XXI.Anete Roese - 2015 - Horizonte 13 (39):1534-1558.
    Religions and the research about them were significantly affected by the feminist practices and studies in the twentieth century. In the religious context that has been presented in this third millennium, marked by the autonomy of women and their role in society, further studies are necessary to understand the religious phenomenon that occurs in the silent protagonism of women. One has to ask how to research and to think religion from a feminist perspective at this time; what religion is for (...)
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  43. Emancipation as Moral Regulation: Latin American Feminisms and Neoliberalism.Verónica Schild - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (3):547-563.
    The article argues that feminist emancipation, understood as practices and discourses of self-development and of solidarity as empowerment, has become entangled with the neoliberal project. Indeed, emancipation as self-improvement has become synonymous with moral regulation projects that seek to adapt women to global capitalism. The article explores the relation between emancipation and neoliberal regulation from a situated approach by addressing the experience of Latin American feminisms, with a particular focus on Chile. This approach recognizes by implication that Latin American feminisms (...)
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  44. Desbordes: Translating Racial, Ethnic, Sexual, and Gender Identities Across the Americas.María Amelia Viteri - 2015 - SUNY Press.
    María-Amelia Viteri explores the multiple unfixed meanings that the term “Latino” takes on as this category is reappropriated and translated by LGBT “Latinos” in Washington, DC, San Salvador, and Quito. Using an anthropology-based, interdisciplinary approach, she exposes the creative ways in which migrants—including herself—subvert traditional readings based on country of origin, skin color, language, and immigrant status. A critical look at the multiple ways migrants view what it means to be American, Latino, and/or queer provides fertile ground for theoretical, methodological, (...)
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  45. Women of Latin America: Disencounters, Traffic of Ideas and Tr.Mariana Alvarado - 2014 - Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 16 (1):13-22.
    La pregunta por la sujeto de enunciación emerge de una experiencia académica y nutre la visibilización de las diferencias que nos atraviesan como mujeres. Revisar las heridas abiertas que la invasión-conquista-colonización-evangelización europea provocó con la implantación de la matriz moderna, colonial, capitalista, patriarcal, occidental permite localizar la doble subalternidad de las mujeres latinoamericanas. Un desencuentro con el humanismo académico permite traducir las raíces que nos atraviesan a nosotras, las mujeres de América Latina. El constructo delimita en la designación un espacio (...)
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  46. Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice.Regina Cochrane - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature wrought via (...)
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  47. Lessons From Latin America: A Commentary of Florencia Luna, "Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America".Allison B. Wolf - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):28-34.
    Florencia Luna begins her essay, “Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America,” by saying: “I want to explore a new way to think about Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in the Latin American context.” I think she clearly achieves that objective. I want to suggest that she does more than this, however. In addition to revealing how traditional depictions of infertility in the United States and Europe are anachronistic for Latin America, her analysis offers feminist bioethicists in the (...)
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  48. María Angélica Illanes O., Nuestra historia violeta. Feminismo social y vidas de mujeres en el siglo XX: una revolución permanente, LOM Ediciones, Santiago, Chile, 2012, 163 p. [REVIEW]Jorge Gaete Lagos - 2013 - Polis: Revista Latinoamericana 35.
    Para un historiador, el contar, escribir o investigar le implica un viaje por el tiempo hacia el pasado, para el cual utiliza como medios de transporte diversos tipos de fuentes que le ayudan a aproximarse a diversos episodios de épocas pretéritas. Aunque esto se lea como algo bastante obvio, una buena parte de ellos optan por privilegiar los documentos para su travesía, siendo pocos los que acuden a la memoria y a las experiencias personales de otras personas con la idea (...)
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  49. The dichotomy progress=order vs. backwardness=disorder during the general strikes of early-20th century in Argentina.Gloria María Hintze - 2013 - Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 15 (2):47-56.
    Este artículo tiene como objetivo analizar el discurso que Clorinda Matto de Turner pronunció en el Consejo Nacional de Mujeres de la República Argentina en el año 1904, titulado "La obrera y la mujer". Su postura transita entre la doctrina de las esferas separadas y la defensa de un feminismo moderado que no participa de las posiciones más radicales de las socialistas ni de las anarquistas que ya tenían presencia activa en el campo cultural de Buenos Aires. This article analyzes (...)
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  50. Teología feminista latinoamericana de la liberación: balance y futuro (Latin American feminist theology of liberation: balance and future).Consuelo Velez - 2013 - Horizonte 11 (32):1801-1812.
    KOINONIA/ASETT MINGA/MUTIRÃO DE REVISTAS DE TEOLOGIA LATINO-AMERICANAS Teología feminista latinoamericana de la liberación: balance y futuro (Latin American feminist theology of liberation: balance and future).
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