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  1. Neurolaw and Direct Brain Interventions.A. Vincent Nicole - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):43-50.
    This issue of Criminal Law and Philosophy contains three papers on a topic of increasing importance within the field of "neurolaw"-namely, the implications for criminal law of direct brain intervention based mind altering techniques. To locate these papers' topic within a broader context, I begin with an overview of some prominent topics in the field of neurolaw, where possible providing some references to relevant literature. The specific questions asked by the three authors, as well as their answers and central claims, (...)
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  2. Privacy in Public and the Contextual Conditions of Agency.Maria Brincker - 2017 - In Tjerk Timan, Bert-Jaap Koops & Bryce Newell (eds.), Privacy in Public Space: Conceptual and Regulatory Challenges. Edward Elgar.
    Current technology and surveillance practices make behaviors traceable to persons in unprecedented ways. This causes a loss of anonymity and of many privacy measures relied on in the past. These de facto privacy losses are by many seen as problematic for individual psychology, intimate relations and democratic practices such as free speech and free assembly. I share most of these concerns but propose that an even more fundamental problem might be that our very ability to act as autonomous and purposive (...)
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  3. Moral Enhancement and Mental Freedom.Christoph Bublitz - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (1):88-106.
    Promotion of pro-social attitudes and moral behaviour is a crucial and challenging task for social orders. As traditional ways such as moral education have some, but apparently and unfortunately only limited effect, some authors have suggested employing biomedical means such as pharmaceuticals or electrical stimulation of the brain to alter individual psychologies in a more direct way — moral bioenhancement. One of the salient questions in the nascent ethical debate concerns the impact of such interventions on human freedom. Advocates argue (...)
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  4. Zwierzęta jako nieosobowe podmioty prawa.Anndrzej Elzanowski & Tomasz Pietrzykowski - 2013 - Forum Prawnicze 15 (1):18-27.
    Animals as Non-personal Carriers of Legal Rights -/- The current body of knowledge about the subjectivity (cognition and value‑laden experience) of some non-human vertebrates makes the juristic dichotomy between commodities and persons untenable. While the great apes may (with some limitations) be treated as persons, most vertebrates are non-personal agents that lack the awareness of their own agency, which does not necessarily diminish the intrinsic value of their lives. Unfortunately, the ongoing efforts to raise the status and thus improve the (...)
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  5. The Normative Structure of Responsibility.Federico Faroldi - 2014 - College Publications.
  6. Neural Implants as Gateways to Digital-Physical Ecosystems and Posthuman Socioeconomic Interaction.Matthew E. Gladden - 2016 - In Łukasz Jonak, Natalia Juchniewicz & Renata Włoch (eds.), Digital Ecosystems: Society in the Digital Age. Digital Economy Lab, University of Warsaw. pp. 85-98.
    For many employees, ‘work’ is no longer something performed while sitting at a computer in an office. Employees in a growing number of industries are expected to carry mobile devices and be available for work-related interactions even when beyond the workplace and outside of normal business hours. In this article it is argued that a future step will increasingly be to move work-related information and communication technology (ICT) inside the human body through the use of neuroprosthetics, to create employees who (...)
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  7. Misuse Made Plain: Evaluating Concerns About Neuroscience in National Security.Kelly Lowenberg, Brenda Simon, Amy Burns, Libby Greismann, Jennifer Halbleib, Govind Persad, David L. M. Preston, Harker Rhodes & Emily Murphy - 2010 - AJOB Neuroscience 1 (2):15-17.
    In this open peer commentary, we categorize the possible “neuroscience in national security” definitions of misuse of science and identify which, if any, are uniquely presented by advances in neuroscience. To define misuse, we first define what we would consider appropriate use: the application of reasonably safe and effective technology, based on valid and reliable scientific research, to serve a legitimate end. This definition presents distinct opportunities for assessing misuse: misuse is the application of invalid or unreliable science, or is (...)
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  8. Neurolaw and Neuroprediction: Potential Promises and Perils.Thomas Nadelhoffer & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (9):631-642.
    Neuroscience has been proposed for use in the legal system for purposes of mind reading, assessment of responsibility, and prediction of misconduct. Each of these uses has both promises and perils, and each raises issues regarding the admissibility of neuroscientific evidence.
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  9. When, and How, Should Cognitive Bias Matter to Law.Govind Persad - 2014 - Law and Ineq 32:31.
    Recent work in the behavioral sciences asserts that we are subject to a variety of cognitive biases. For example, we mourn losses more than we prize equivalently sized gains; we are more inclined to believe something if it matches our previous beliefs; and we even relate more warmly or coldly to others depending on whether the coffee cup we are holding is warm or cold. Drawing on this work, case law and legal scholarship have asserted that we have reason to (...)
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  10. Judging Mechanistic Neuroscience: A Preliminary Conceptual-Analytic Framework for Evaluating Scientific Evidence in the Courtroom.Jacqueline Anne Sullivan & Emily Baron - 2018 - Psychology, Crime and Law (00):00-00.
    The use of neuroscientific evidence in criminal trials has been steadily increasing. Despite progress made in recent decades in understanding the mechanisms of psychological and behavioral functioning, neuroscience is still in an early stage of development and its potential for influencing legal decision-making is highly contentious. Scholars disagree about whether or how neuroscientific evidence might impact prescriptions of criminal culpability, particularly in instances in which evidence of an accused’s history of mental illness or brain abnormality is offered to support a (...)
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  11. Language Impairment and Legal Literacy: Is a Degree of Perfectionism Unavoidable?Cristian Timmermann - 2017 - AJOB Neuroscience 8 (1):43-45.
    Wszalek offers a detailed examination of the challenges involved in assisting people with language and communication impairments in the comprehension of legal language and concepts (LLC). If we settle for a minimum threshold of LLC comprehension, we are likely to observe that some people will not meet this threshold due to personal choices, such as not having practiced reading sufficiently or having avoided intellectually stimulating social interactions.
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  12. Legal Responsibility Adjudication and the Normative Authority of the Mind Sciences.Nicole A. Vincent - 2011 - Philosophical Explorations 14 (3):315-331.
    In the field of ?neurolaw?, reformists claim that recent scientific discoveries from the mind sciences have serious ramifications for how legal responsibility should be adjudicated, but conservatives deny that this is so. In contrast, I criticise both of these polar opposite positions by arguing that although scientific findings can have often-weighty normative significance, they lack the normative authority with which reformists often imbue them. After explaining why conservatives and reformists are both wrong, I then offer my own moderate suggestions about (...)
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  13. On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility.Nicole A. Vincent - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):77-98.
  14. Neurolaw: The Big Question.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):21 – 22.
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  15. Wokół Intuicyjnych Decyzji Prawniczych [Few Remarks on Intuitive Legal Decisions].Radosław Zyzik - manuscript
    W artykule analizowane jest zagadnienie wiarygodności decyzji intuicyjnych w procesie stosowania prawa. Analizy prowadzone są z perspektywy psychologii poznawczej, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem prac nad intuicją ekspercką. Celem prowadzonych analiz jest odpowiedź na pytanie, czy można mówić o wiarygodnych prawniczych decyzjach intuicyjnych. Zestawione zostają badania amerykańskich realistów prawniczych i psychologów poznawczych w celu ich konfrotancji i ustalenia warunków wpływających na proces podejmowania decyzji i wydawania ocen intuicyjnych. Artykuł kończy się przedstawieniem modelu podejmowania decyzji intuicyjnych w naukach psychologicznych i naukach prawnych. -/- (...)
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  16. Dowody Neuronaukowe W Polskim Prawie Dowodowym (Neuroscientific Evidence in the Polish Law of Evidence).Radosław Zyzik - 2013 - Forum Prawnicze 2 (16):23-34.
    W artykule analizowane są normatywne kryteria dopuszczalności dowodów naukowych w polskim systemie prawnym, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem dowodów neuronaukowych. W pierwszej kolejności zostaną przedstawione metody neuroobrazowania mózgu ze wskazaniem rodzaju spraw, w których zostały one wykorzystane. W drugiej kolejności omówione zostaną kryteria dopuszczalności dowodów naukowych w polskim i amerykańskim systemie prawnym. Następnie zidentyfikowanych zostanie szereg zagrożeń, których źródłem może być niezrozumienie natury i niewłaściwe posługiwanie się dowodami neuronaukowymi. Ostatnia część pracy zawiera szereg sugestii o charakterze normatywnym i pozanormatywnym, mających na celu (...)
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