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  1. Pequeno comentário a 'Fundamental Legal Concepts (as Aplied in Judicial Reasoning) I' de Wesley Hohfeld.Ricardo Tavares Da Silva - manuscript
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  2. Black White Paper: Tractatus logico-academicus.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    A draft White Paper associated with Fulbright Specialist Program lectures at the University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia, in March-April 2015, concerning neo-liberal capitalist exploitation of academic research and publications.
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  3. The Grounds of Human Rights.Brian Slattery - manuscript
    What is the rational foundation for the doctrine of universal human rights? Some philosophers, such as Alan Gewirth, argue that it may be discovered simply by reflection on certain essential features of the human constitution. However this approach has significant problems, achieving its ends by smuggling certain tacit premises into the argument. A better approach is one that appeals to the communal practices and traditions within which doctrines of human rights have evolved historically. It is here that Alasdair MacIntyre's work (...)
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  4. Democracy, Law and Authority, Review of Lukas Meyer, Stanley Paulson and Thomas Pogge (eds), Rights, Culture and the Law: Themes from the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz.Samantha Besson - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
  5. Asimetría constitucional y los límites del balanceo. Una nota crítica a la postura de Matthias Klatt.Miguel Garcia-Godinez - forthcoming - In Diana Gonzalez & Ruben Sanchez (eds.), El test de proporcionalidad, convergencias y divergencias.
  6. Educational Justice and School Boosting.Marcus Arvan - 2024 - Social Theory and Practice 50 (1):1-31.
    School boosters are tax-exempt organizations that engage in fundraising efforts to provide public schools with supplementary resources. This paper argues that prevailing forms of school boosting are defeasibly unjust. Section 1 shows that inequalities in public education funding in the United States violate John Rawls’s two principles of domestic justice. Section 2 argues that prevailing forms of school boosting exacerbate and plausibly perpetuate these injustices. Section 3 then contends that boosting thereby defeasibly violates Rawlsian principles of nonideal theory for rectifying (...)
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  7. Freedom of Conscience: A Communal-based Approach.Owen Jeffrey Crocker - 2024 - Appeal: Review of Current Law and Law Reform 29 (1):25-47.
    Despite the plethora of freedom of religion literature (under section 2(a) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms), the corresponding literature on the freedom of conscience is minimal. To further the discussion on the freedom of conscience, I rely heavily on the philosophical literature to make an important distinction; the difference between individual- based and communal-based conceptions of conscience. Whereas the former is plagued with subjectivity, making it difficult to conceptualize a working framework for the Charter right, the latter (...)
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  8. Building a Fair Future: Transforming Immigration Policy for Refugees and Families.Matthew J. Lister - 2024 - In Matteo Bonotti & Narelle Miragliotta (eds.), Australian Politics at a Crossroads: Prospects for Change. Routledge. pp. 149-16`.
    In this chapter I focus on two problems facing immigration systems around the world, and Australia in particular. The topics addressed are chosen because each one involves important fundamental rights and because significant improvement in these areas is possible even if each state acts alone, without significant coordination with others. First, I examine refugee programmes, focussing specifically on the ‘two- tier’ refugee programmes pioneered by Australia with the introduction of Temporary Protection Visas by the Howard Government in 1999. Next, I (...)
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  9. The Theory and Practice of Self-Determination at the UN: Challenges for International Law, Prospects for Global Governance.Kiraan Chetty - 2023 - Global Studies Research Series 10:1-31.
    Whether as a rule, principle, ideal, or procedure, self-determination – however complicated – is here to stay. For it to remain politically viable, however, we need reexamine its ontology and teleology: its existence and function. As we leave the modern age in which it was molded, self-determination is confronted by challenges unique to our time. How we, in the 21st century, manage to keep alive and accommodate the concept will determine how the next stage in our global history unfolds. The (...)
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  10. Policing.Luke William Hunt - 2023 - In Mortimer Sellers & Stephan Kirste (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy.
    This chapter offers an overview and analysis of policing, the area of criminal justice associated primarily with law enforcement. The study of policing spans a variety of disciplines, including criminology, law, philosophy, politics, and psychology, among other fields. Although research on policing is broad in scope, it has become an especially notable area of study in contemporary legal and social philosophy given recent police controversies.
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  11. Property and non-ideal theory.Adam Lovett - 2023 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 1:1-25.
    According to the standard story, there are two defensible theories of property rights: historical and institutional theories. The former says that you own something when you’ve received it via an unbroken chain of just transfers from its original appropriation. The latter says that you own something when you’ve been assigned it by just institutions. This standard story says that the historical theory throws up a barrier to redistributive economic policies while the institutional theory does not. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  12. Hate Speech as Antithetical to Free Speech: The Real Polarity.Tiffany Elise Montoya - 2023 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. Edited by Will Barnes.
    I claim that hate speech is actually antithetical to free speech. Nevertheless, this claim invokes the misconception that one would be jeopardizing free speech due to a phenomenon known as "false polarization" – a “tendency for disputants to overestimate the extent to which they disagree about whatever contested question is at hand.” The real polarity does not lie between hate speech (as protected free speech) vs. censorship. Rather, hate speech is censorship. It is the censorship of entire sectors of the (...)
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  13. The Right to Do Wrong: Morality and the Limits of Law, by Mark Osiel (Cambridge: Harvard University Press), 2019. [REVIEW]Daniel Muñoz - 2023 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 17 (2):523-529.
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  14. Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity): A New Legal System Where the Will of People with Disabilities Really Matters? The Portuguese Experience.Joana Isabel Taveira Ferreira Neto - 2023 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 36 (2):745-765.
    Law 49/2018, of August 14, created the Portuguese legal regime of the assisted decision-making (capacity), thus eliminating the legal institutes of interdiction and disqualification, provided for in the Civil Code (CC). The aim of this legal regime was to embed a new vision of disability based on a model of rights, that grants people with disabilities an independent and autonomous life and reflects the acceptance of the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) guidelines. This paper intends (...)
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  15. ‘But You Could Have Hurt Me!’: Risk and Harm.Joseph Bowen - 2022 - Law and Philosophy 41 (4):517-546.
    This paper answers two questions. First, on the assumption that risk of harm is of moral significance, does risk’s moral significance lay in its being harmful? Second, is risk of harm itself harmful? I argue that either risk is not harmful or that risk is harmful only in a small range of cases. If risk is not harmful, and yet risk is of moral significance, risk’s moral significance cannot lie in its being harmful. And if risk is harmful only in (...)
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  16. Can Normative Accounts of Discrimination Be Guided by Anti-discrimination Law? Should They?Rona Dinur - 2022 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 15 (2):aa–aa.
    In her recent book, Faces of Inequality (2020), Moreau aims at developing a normative account of discrimination that is guided by the main features of anti-discrimination law. The critical comment argues against this methodology, indicating that due to indeterminacy relative to their underlying normative principles, central anti-discrimination norms cannot fulfill this guiding role. Further, using the content of such norms to guide ethical discussions is likely to be misleading, as it reflects evidentiary considerations that are unique to the legal context. (...)
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  17. Rights Correlativity.David Frydrych - 2022 - In The Legacy of Wesley Hohfeld. Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-137.
    This chapter explicates and critically assesses RIGHTS CORRELATIVITY. Section II addresses three core issues. The first concerns the conceptual structure of the tethered positions: does correlativity mean that the positions’ features must be symmetrical? Are correlative rights and duties the “mirror images” of one another, or not? A second issue is Existential correlativity: must the positions invariably co-obtain, or can one exist with the other(s)? Can there be a right without a correlative duty, and vice versa? A third issue concerns (...)
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  18. Criminal Law and Republican Liberty: Philip Pettit’s Account.Jeremy Horder - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (1):193-213.
    Philip Pettit has made central to modern republican theory a distinctive account of freedom—republican freedom. On this account, I am not free solely because I can make choices without interference. I am truly free, only if that non-interference does not itself depend on another’s forbearance. Pettit believes that the principal justification for the traditional focus of the criminal law is that it constitutes a bulwark against domination. I will, in part, be considering the merits of this claim. Is the importance (...)
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  19. Mitä merkitystä rangaistuksella on?Antti Kauppinen - 2022 - In Rikoksen ja rangaistuksen filosofia.
    On varsin yleisesti hyväksyttyä, että rangaistuksen ilmaisullinen tehtävä - eli se, että se ilmaisee yhteisön paheksuntaa - on yksi sen ominaispiirre. Viime aikoina on kuitenkin esitetty myös kunnianhimoisempia väitteitä siitä, että rangaistuksen voisi oikeuttaa sen ilmaisullisella tehtävällä. Nämä näkemykset ovat myös saaneet runsaasti kritiikkiä. Tässä esseessä kehittelen aiemmin muotoilemaani versiota ekspressiivisestä rangaistusteoriasta, jonka mukaan asenteiden toiminnallinen ilmaisu rankaisemalla on oikeutettua siksi, että muuten rikoksen uhrilla ei ole hänelle kuuluvaa oikeudenhaltijan statusta. Jos ihmisen oikeuksia voi loukata rangaistuksetta, ne jäävät moraaliseksi ihanteeksi (...)
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  20. European Human Rights Dimension of the Online Access to Cultural Heritage in Times of the COVID-19 Outbreak.Elżbieta Kużelewska & Mariusz Tomaszuk - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (3):1067-1079.
    The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognized that “everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits”. As a result, cultural rights have been understood as inseparable from human rights and require protection mechanisms within particular international legal systems. The European continent is proud to have developed one of the most effective mechanisms of the human rights protection by establishing the Council (...)
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  21. That’s None of Your Business! On the Limits of Employer Control of Employee Behavior Outside of Working Hours.Matthew Lister - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 35 (2):405-26.
    Employers seeking to control employee behavior outside of working hours is nothing new. However, recent developments have extended efforts to control employee behavior into new areas, with new significance. Employers seek to control legal behavior by employees outside of working hours, to have significant influence over employee’s health-related behavior, and to monitor and control employee’s social media, even when this behavior has nothing to do with the workplace. In this article, I draw on the work of political theorists Jon Elster, (...)
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  22. European Problems in Understanding Human Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2022 - Encyclopedia of Contemporary Constitutionalism.
    (Introduction) Dignity is regarded today as a fundamental, or even the most fundamental, value across legal systems, at both international and national levels. It seems to be one of the values which provide a common axiological basis for different constitutional traditions across Europe (de Lange 2007: esp. 3-6). Moreover, taking account of its prominent place in the law of the United Nations, human dignity is one of the values on which the international community rests. The expression “human dignity” belongs to (...)
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  23. Godność jako cecha podmiotów zbiorowych lub cecha ugruntowana instytucjonalnie. Typy godności – propozycja systematyzacji (część 2) [Dignity as an Attribute of Collective Entities and Dignity as an Institutionally Grounded Attribute: Types of Dignity – a Proposed Systematisation (Part 2)].Marek Piechowiak - 2022 - Przegląd Konstytucyjny 2022 (4):73-93.
    This study aims to identify various meanings of the expression (name) “dignity”, with particular emphasis on the meanings of this expression as it appears in the text of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland. The meaning of the name “dignity” is the concept of dignity; in turn, the different concepts of dignity encompass dignity of particular types. Twelve different meanings of the expression “dignity” are indicated – twelve different concepts of dignity, and thus twelve types of dignity. Half of (...)
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  24. Godność jako właściwość osoby. Typy godności – propozycja systematyzacji (część 1) [Dignity as a Quality of Person: Types of Dignity – a Proposed Systematisation (Part 1)].Marek Piechowiak - 2022 - Przegląd Konstytucyjny 2022 (2):7-30.
    "Dignity as a Quality of Person: Types of Dignity – a Proposed Systematisation" This study aims to identify various meanings of the expression (name) “dignity”, with particular emphasis on the meanings of the expression as it appears in the text of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland. The meaning of the name “dignity” is the concept of dignity; in turn, the concept of dignity encompasses dignity of particular types. Twelve different meanings of the expression “dignity” are indicated – twelve (...)
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  25. Aportaciones heurísticas a la investigación en el derecho constitucional. Los principios democráticos en la doctrina constitucional española como ejemplo práctico.Joaquin Sarrion Esteve - 2022 - Anuario Iberoamericano de Justicia Constitucional 26 (1).
    Aportaciones heurísticas a la investigación en el derecho constitucional. Los principios democráticos en la doctrina constitucional española como ejemplo práctico.
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  26. Dark Times, Black Light: A Reply to Yankah, Kelly, and Mills.Tommie Shelby - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (1):45-55.
    Replies to symposium commentaries on the book Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform.
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  27. Taxation and the Moral Authority of Conventions.Fabian Wendt - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (1):118-138.
    Lockeans regard taxation as a—perhaps sometimes permissible—infringement of moral property entitlements. This essay discusses whether, or in what form, this charge is defensible. In doing so, it will explore the truth and the limits of the conventionalist reply of Murphy and Nagel to Lockean challenges to taxation. It argues that there is a moral rationale for property conventions that is independent of the question whether and how one can acquire natural, pre-conventional property rights in the state of nature, that this (...)
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  28. Whose Burden to Bear? Privilege, Lawbreaking and Race.Ekow N. Yankah - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (1):13-28.
    Tommie Shelby’s Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform is a powerful indictment of how the basic structure of American institutions fail the seriously disadvantaged. Though motivated by what we collectively owe “ghetto” citizens, when exploring criminal law, Shelby instinctively turns his attention to what duties, if any, the disadvantaged have to obey the criminal law. This paper argues that our persistent focus on the obligations of the disadvantaged is a mistake. Instead, we should examine the duties of the advantaged to (...)
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  29. What Makes Disability Discrimination Wrong?Jeffrey M. Brown - 2021 - Law and Philosophy 40 (1):1-31.
    This paper concerns the question of what makes disability discrimination morally objectionable. When I refer to disability discrimination, I am focusing solely on a failure or denial of reasonable accommodations to a disabled person. I argue a failure to provide reasonable accommodations is wrong when and because it violates principles of relational equality. To do so, I examine four accounts of wrongful discrimination found in the literature and apply these theories to disability discrimination. I argue that all of these accounts (...)
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  30. Human Rights and Rights of Nature: Prospects for a Linkage Argument.Daniel P. Corrigan - 2021 - In Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.), Rights of Nature: A Re-examination. Routledge. pp. 101-120.
  31. Rights of Nature: A Re-examination.Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    Rights of nature is an idea that has come of age. In recent years, a diverse range of countries and jurisdictions have adopted these norms, which involve granting legal rights to nature or natural objects, such as rivers, forests, or ecosystems. This book critically examines the idea of natural objects as right-holders, and analyses legal cases, policies, and philosophical issues relating to this development. -/- Drawing on contributions from a range of experts in the field, Rights of Nature: A Re-examination (...)
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  32. Rights of Nature: Exploring the Territory.Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen - 2021 - In Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.), Rights of Nature: A Re-examination. Routledge. pp. 1-13.
  33. Religious Liberty and the Alleged Afterlife.Richard Eva - 2021 - Southwest Philosophy Review 37 (1):179-185.
    It is common for religiously motivated actions to be specially protected by law. Many legal theorists have asked why: what makes religion special? What makes it worthy of toleration over and above other non-religious deeply held convictions? The answer I put forward is that religions’ alleged afterlife consequences call for a principle of toleration that warrants special legal treatment. Under a Rawlsian principle of toleration, it is reasonable for those in the original position to opt for principles of justice that (...)
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  34. The Architecture of Rights: Models and Theories.David Frydrych - 2021 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    What is a right? What, if anything, makes rights different from other features of the normative world, such as duties, standards, rules, or principles? Do all rights serve some ultimate purpose? In addition to raising these questions, philosophers and jurists have long been aware that different senses of ‘a right’ abound. To help make sense of this diversity, and to address the above questions, they developed two types of accounts of rights: models and theories. This book explicates rights modelling and (...)
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  35. Neuro rights, the new human rights.Deepa Kansra - 2021 - Rights Compass.
    The human mind has been a subject matter of study in psychology, law, science, philosophy and other disciplines. By definition, its potential is power, abilities and capacities including perception, knowledge, sensation, memory, belief, imagination, emotion, mood, appetite, intention, and action (Pardo, Patterson). In terms of role, it creates and shapes societal morality, culture, peace and democracy. Today, a rapidly advancing science–technology–artificial intelligence (AI) landscape is able to reach into the inner realms of the human mind. Technology, particularly neurotechnology enables access (...)
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  36. Address, Interests, and Directed Duties.Simon Căbulea May - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (2):194-201.
    Rowan Cruft offers an addressive account of directed duties and claim-rights. He claims that the direction of a duty is constituted by two requirements of address between the parties: the right holder must conceive of the action as `to be done to me’ and the duty bearer must conceive of it as to be ‘done to you’. Cruft also argues against accounts of direction and claim-rights that reduce the relation between the parties to nonrelational facts. One such reductive account is (...)
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  37. How to Justify Mandatory Electoral Quotas: A Political Egalitarian Approach.Attila Mráz - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (4):285-315.
    (OPEN ACCESS) This paper offers a novel substantive justification for mandatory electoral quotas—e.g., gender or racial quotas—and a new methodological approach to their justification. Substantively, I argue for a political egalitarian account of electoral quotas. Methodologically, based on this account and a political egalitarian grounding of political participatory rights, I offer an alternative to the External Restriction Approach to the justification of electoral quotas. The External Restriction Approach sees electoral quotas as at best justified restrictions on political participatory rights. I (...)
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  38. Cyberbullying in Nigeria: Examining the Adequacy of Legal Responses.Adejoke O. Adediran - 2020 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 34 (4):965-984.
    Cyberbullying has been defined as the “process of using the internet, cell phones or other devices to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person.” The word “cyberbullying” is often used interchangeably with “cyber stalking” and in fact the Cybercrimes Act 2015 of Nigeria, uses the word “cyber stalking” which it defines as any course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. By the provisions of the (...)
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  39. Religious exemptions, claims of conscience, and idola fori.Andrei Bespalov - 2020 - Jurisprudence 11 (2):225-242.
    According to the standard liberal egalitarian approach, religious exemptions from generally applicable laws can be justified on the grounds of equal respect for each citizen’s conscience. I contend that claims of conscience cannot justify demands for exemptions, since they do not meet even the most inclusive standards of public justification. Arguments of the form ‘My conscience says so’ do not explicate the rationale behind the practices that the claimants seek to protect. Therefore, such arguments do not constitute even pro tanto (...)
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  40. Beyond Normative Control: Against the Will Theory of Rights.Joseph Bowen - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):427-443.
    The Will Theory of Rights says that having control over another’s duties grounds rights. The Will Theory has commonly been objected to on the grounds that it undergenerates right-ascriptions along three fronts. This paper systematically examines a range of positions open to the Will Theory in response to these counterexamples, while being faithful to the Will Theory’s focus on normative control. It argues that of the seemingly plausible ways the defender of the Will Theory can proceed, one cannot both be (...)
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  41. AI As a Moral Right-Holder.Joseph Bowen & John Basl - 2020 - In Markus Dubber, Frank Pasquale & Sunit Das (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics of AI. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter evaluates whether AI systems are or will be rights-holders, explaining the conditions under which people should recognize AI systems as rights-holders. It develops a skeptical stance toward the idea that current forms of artificial intelligence are holders of moral rights, beginning with an articulation of one of the most prominent and most plausible theories of moral rights: the Interest Theory of rights. On the Interest Theory, AI systems will be rights-holders only if they have interests or a well-being. (...)
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  42. Our “Barbarians” at the Gate: On the Undercriminalized Citizenship Deprivation as a Counterterrorism Tool.Ivó Coca-Vila - 2020 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 14 (2):149-167.
    Germany is joining a long list of European democracies that have modified or expressed a willingness to modify their citizenship laws to denationalize first and then prevent the return of or expel those citizens accused of having participated in terrorist activities abroad. The formal labelling of citizenship deprivation as an administrative measure outside the scope of criminal justice has prevented scholars of criminal law from undertaking a thorough scrutiny of its legitimacy. In this paper I seek to fill this gap. (...)
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  43. Direct and Indirect Discrimination: A Defense of the Disparate Impact Model.Hugo Cossette-Lefebvre - 2020 - Public Affairs Quarterly 34 (4):340-367.
    The status of indirect discrimination is ambiguous in the current literature. This paper addresses two contemporary and related debates. First, for some, indirect discrimination is not truly a distinct kind of discrimination, but it is simply a legal construct designed to address distributive inequalities between groups. Second, even if one accepts that indirect discrimination is a distinct type of discrimination, the connection between the two kinds of discrimination, direct and indirect, is debated. For some, they are distinct act-types, while for (...)
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  44. El consentimiento informado del paciente como derecho fundamental y como derecho subjetivo.Noelia Martínez Doallo - 2020 - Dissertation, Facultad de Derecho, Universidade da Coruña
    El consentimiento informado del paciente se inserta en el ámbito de su autonomía decisoria. Aunque presenta un sustrato corporal, este aparece combinado con elementos de índole moral que presuponen una noción concreta de persona como libre y autónoma. Tanto de las definiciones doctrinales como del material normativo se desprende que se trata de una posición jurídica subjetiva del paciente, alternativamente calificada como una “pretensión” o “derecho subjetivo en sentido estricto”, en términos hohfeldianos; un “derecho negativo de defensa”, o una “inmunidad”. (...)
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  45. The Case Against the Theories of Rights.David Frydrych - 2020 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 40 (2):320-346.
    There is a long-standing debate about how best to explain rights—one dominated by two rivals, the Interest and Will theories. This article argues that, not only is each theory irredeemably flawed, the entire debate ought to be abandoned. Section two explains the debate and its constituent theories as a dispute over the criteria for the concept of a right, or for some subset of rights. Section three argues that each theory contains fatal idiosyncratic defects—ones that mostly differ from the canonical (...)
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  46. Compromise and religious freedom.Brian Hutler - 2020 - Law and Philosophy 39 (2):177-202.
    Compromise is surprisingly common in the context of religious freedom. In Holt v. Hobbs, for example, a Muslim prison inmate challenged his prison’s no-beards policy on religious freedom grounds. He proposed, and was eventually granted, a compromise that allowed him to grow a half-inch beard rather than the full beard normally required by his beliefs. Some have argued that such a compromise is inconsistent with the purpose of religious freedom, which is to guard against interference with an individual’s religious practices. (...)
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  47. Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligence: Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule.Tyler L. Jaynes - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):343-354.
    The concept of artificial intelligence is not new nor is the notion that it should be granted legal protections given its influence on human activity. What is new, on a relative scale, is the notion that artificial intelligence can possess citizenship—a concept reserved only for humans, as it presupposes the idea of possessing civil duties and protections. Where there are several decades’ worth of writing on the concept of the legal status of computational artificial artefacts in the USA and elsewhere, (...)
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  48. Forfeiture and the Right to a Fair Trial.Gerald Lang - 2020 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 14 (2):203-213.
    In his Rights Forfeiture and Punishment, Christopher Heath Wellman argues that his preferred ‘strong’ version of rights forfeiture theory makes the moral rights of due process and a fair trial null and void for guilty offenders. They may still possess legal rights to due process, but these are not strong pre-institutional moral rights. I explain here why I disagree with Wellman. I also suggest that he is not entitled, by his own lights, to affirm strong forfeiture theory, at least in (...)
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  49. Against the Managerial State: Preventive Policing as Non-Legal Governance.John Lawless - 2020 - Law and Philosophy (6):657-689.
    Since at least the 1980s, police departments in the United States have embraced a set of practices that aim, not to enable the prosecution of past criminal activity, but to discourage people from breaking the law in the first place. It is not clear that these practices effectively lower the crime rate. However, whatever its effect on the crime rate, I argue that preventive policing is essentially distinct from legal governance, and that excessive reliance on preventive policing undermines legal governance. (...)
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  50. El consentimiento informado en los Estados Unidos de América. Génesis, evolución, fundamentos y breve comparación crítica con el modelo español.Noelia Martinez-Doallo - 2020 - DS: Derecho y Salud 30 (2):57-83.
    El análisis de la protección jurídica del consentimiento informado del paciente en los Estados Unidos de América pasa ante todo por considerar las soluciones proporcionadas por el common law, sin perjuicio de las previsiones establecidas en las diversas legislaciones estatales en la materia y la posible vía de protección constitucional, aun cuando se constatan ciertas dificultades que no han de ser consideradas insalvables. El presente artículo se propone ofrecer una revisión pormenorizada acerca del origen, la evolución y los fundamentos de (...)
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