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  1. added 2020-05-30
    Finite Minds and Their Representations in Leibniz and Kant.Anja Jauernig - 2019 - Internationales Jahrbuch des Deutschen Idealismus / International Yearbook of German Idealism 14:47-80.
    This essay examines some of the ways in which the assumption of the essential finitude of the human mind, in contrast to the infinitude of God’s mind, bears on Leibniz’s and Kant’s accounts of our representational capacities. This examination reveals several underappreciated similarities between their views, but also some notable differences that help us pinpoint where and in what ways Kant departs from his celebrated predecessor. The fruits of this examination are a better understanding of Kant’s conception of the discursivity (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-22
    G.W. Leibniz: Sign and the Problem of Expression.Dimitri A. Bayuk & Olga B. Fedorova - 2020 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 57 (1):146-165.
    The disciplinary differentiation of sciences attracted Leibniz’s attention for a long period of time. From nowadays prospects it looks very well grounded as soon as in Leibniz’s manuscripts a modern scholar finds clue ideas of any research field which would tempt him to consider Leibniz as one of the founders of this particular discipline. We argue that this is possible only in retrospection and would significantly distort the essence of Leibniz’s epistemology. Our approach implies, in contrary, the investigation of the (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-22
    Leibniz y la hermeneutica: Perspectivismo y funsion de horizontes.Oscar Esquisabel - 2016 - Dissertatio 43 (S3):35-72.
    El objetivo de este trabajo es exponer una aproximación a los puntos de contacto y de divergencia entre el pensamiento de Leibniz y la hermenéutica de Gadamer, en la perspectiva de justificar la actualidad del pensamiento leibniziano desde el punto de vista de la concepción actual de la racionalidad. La hermenéutica propone un concepto de razón “débil” que se funda en la noción de fusión de horizontes, que puede ser interpretado como una forma de perspectivismo. Como contrapartida, se examina el (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-22
    "La place d'autrui": Perspectivismo y normatividad según Leibniz.Evelyn Vargas - 2016 - Dissertatio 43 (S3):73-85.
    Mi propósito en este artículo es analizar una forma de perspectivismo entendido como un tipo de escepticismo, y los argumentos de Leibniz en contra de él. Discuto cómo esta forma de perspectivismo conduce a la isostheneia y a la suspensión del juicio, y presento la estrategia de Leibniz para impedir estas consecuencias escépticas, y finalmente ofrezco un ejemplo de esta estrategia.
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  5. added 2020-05-12
    Cristina Marras, Metaphora translata voce. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia 101 (3):450-452.
    The theses in this book are: 1) the tension between the Leibnizian theory of the tropes and their use is resolved in a "pragmatic of discourse" that gives the metaphor a richer dimension than the theorized one, that is, that of "a mechanism capable of combining elements coming from different conceptual spaces into a new metaphorical conceptual space, 'shapeless' to which the metaphor itself provides an adequate language to describe and structure it"; 2) the role of metaphors is placed for (...)
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  6. added 2020-02-25
    Common Notions and Instincts as Sources of Moral Knowledge in Leibniz’s New Essays on Human Understanding.Markku Roinila - 2020 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 8 (1):141-170.
    In his defense of innateness in New Essays on Human Understanding (1704), Leibniz attributes innateness to concepts and principles which do not originate from the senses rather than to the ideas that we are born with. He argues that the innate concepts and principles can be known in two ways: through reason or natural light (necessary truths), and through instincts (other innate truths and principles). In this paper I will show how theoretical and moral reasoning differ from each other in (...)
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  7. added 2019-09-10
    Leibniz's Legacy and Impact.Julia Weckend & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume tells the story of the legacy and impact of the great German polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Leibniz made significant contributions to many areas, including philosophy, mathematics, political and social theory, theology, and various sciences. The essays in this volume explores the effects of Leibniz’s profound insights on subsequent generations of thinkers by tracing the ways in which his ideas have been defended and developed in the three centuries since his death. Each of the 11 essays is concerned (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-22
    Equivalence of Hypotheses and Galilean Censure in Leibniz: A Conspiracy or a Way to Moderate Censure?Laurynas Adomaitis - 2019 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 72 (1):63-85.
    Spending six months in Rome in 1689 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) occupied himself with the question of Copernican and Galilean censure. An established reading of the Rome papers suggests that Leibniz’s attempt to have the Copernican censure lifted was derived solely from the equivalence of hypotheses stemming from the relativity of motion; and involved Leibniz’s compromising his belief in the truth of the Copernican hypothesis by arguing that it should only be interpreted instrumentally; and that Leibniz believed in the unrestricted (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-13
    Leibniz's Formal Theory of Contingency.Jeffrey McDonough & Zeynep Soysal - 2018 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 21:17-43.
    This essay argues that, with his much-maligned “infinite analysis” theory of contingency, Leibniz is onto something deep and important – a tangle of issues that wouldn’t be sorted out properly for centuries to come, and then only by some of the greatest minds of the twentieth century. The first two sections place Leibniz’s theory in its proper historical context and draw a distinction between Leibniz’s logical and meta-logical discoveries. The third section argues that Leibniz’s logical insights initially make his “infinite (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-05
    The Practice of Reason: Leibniz and His Controversies.Marcelo Dascal (ed.) - 2010 - John Benjamins.
    CHAPTER The principle of continuity and the 'paradox' of Leibnizian mathematics* Michel Serfati. Introduction On the basis of the epistemological analysis ...
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  11. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz, a Friend of Molinism.Juan Garcia - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):397-420.
    Leibniz is commonly labeled a foe of Molinism. His rejection of robust libertarian freedom coupled with some explicit passages in which he distances himself from the doctrine of middle knowledge seem to justify this classification. In this paper, I argue that this standard view is not quite correct. I identify the two substantive tenets of Molinism. First, the connection between the conditions for free actions and these free actions is a contingent one: free actions follow contingently from their sufficient conditions. (...)
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  12. added 2019-04-22
    Reflection, Intelligibility, and Leibniz’s Case Against Materialism.Julia Borcherding - 2018 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 21:44-68.
    Leibniz’s claim that it is possible for us to gain metaphysical knowledge through reflection on the self has intrigued many commentators, but it has also often been criticized as flawed or unintelligible. A similar fate has beset Leibniz’s arguments against materialism. In this paper, I explore one of Leibniz’s lesser-known arguments against materialism from his reply to Bayle’s new note L (1702), and argue that it provides us with an instance of a Leibnizian “argument from reflection”. This argument, I further (...)
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  13. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz: The Birthplace of Modern Aesthetics.Masoud Olya & Mani Rashtipour - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 11 (20):157-177.
    Leibniz’s philosophy has been subject to many studies, but few have addressed aesthetic aspects of his theory. What Leibniz has written concerning aesthetic issues is scattered all through his works, and were we to understand his aesthetic ideas we must bring these dispersed parts together for explanation and interpretation. In the present paper, I attempted to extract Leibniz ideas pertaining to aesthetics, and to introduce, on their basis, a unified aesthetic theory of his, and demonstrate the importance of this theory (...)
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  14. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz: The Birthplace of Modern Aesthetics.Masoud Olya & Mani Rashtipour - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations at University of Tabriz 11 (20):157-177.
    Leibniz’s philosophy has been subject to many studies, but few have addressed aesthetic aspects of his theory. What Leibniz has written concerning aesthetic issues is scattered all through his works, and were we to understand his aesthetic ideas we must bring these dispersed parts together for explanation and interpretation. In the present paper, I attempted to extract Leibniz ideas pertaining to aesthetics, and to introduce, on their basis, a unified aesthetic theory of his, and demonstrate the importance of this theory (...)
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  15. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz's Passionate Knowledge.Markku Roinila - 2016 - Blityri (1/2 2015):75-85.
    In §18 of Principles of Nature and Grace, Based on Reason, Leibniz says: ”Thus our happiness will never consist, and must never consist, in complete joy, in which nothing is left to desire, and which would dull our mind, but must consist in a perpetual progress to new pleasures and new perfections.” -/- This passage is typical in Leibniz’s Nachlass. Universal perfection creates in us joy or pleasure of the mind and its source is our creator, God. When this joy (...)
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  16. added 2019-04-22
    Actualism and Analyticity: Leibniz's Early Thoughts Towards a Synthesis Between Lutheran Metaphysics and the Foundation of Knowledge.Marine Picon - 2014 - The Leibniz Review 24:47-67.
    Recent scholarship has established that, until the mid-1670s, Leibniz did not hold the possibilist ontology which, in his mature philosophy, provides the foundation for both his account of human freedom and of eternal truth. Concentrating on the Mainz period , this paper examines the conciliation, in those early writings, of an actualist ontology and a conception of necessary truth as analytical. The first section questions the view that Leibniz was educated in a “Platonist” tradition; the second section presents the actualist (...)
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  17. added 2019-04-22
    Purely Practical Reason: Normative Epistemology From Leibniz to Maimon.Daniel Whistler - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):395-419.
    In this paper, I contend that a crucial historical precedent for contemporary interest in virtue epistemology is to be found in Leibniz-Wolffian rationalism. For philosophers from Wolff to Lessing, epistemology was thoroughly normative; that is, the task of epistemology was not to describe knowledge, but set rules for the amelioration of knowledge. Such a normative stance was transferred into cognate disciplines, such as aesthetics, as well. I further argue that after Kant’s Copernican revolution in philosophy in 1781 strands of this (...)
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  18. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz's Twofold Gap Between Moral Knowledge and Motivation.Julia Jorati - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):748-766.
    Moral rationalists and sentimentalists traditionally disagree on at least two counts, namely regarding the source of moral knowledge or moral judgements and regarding the source of moral motivation. I will argue that even though Leibniz's moral epistemology is very much in line with that of mainstream moral rationalists, his account of moral motivation is better characterized as sentimentalist. Just like Hume, Leibniz denies that there is a necessary connection between knowing that something is right and the motivation to act accordingly. (...)
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  19. added 2019-04-22
    Purely Practical Reason: Normative Epistemology From Leibniz to Maimon.Daniel Whistler - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):395-419.
    In this paper, I contend that a crucial historical precedent for contemporary interest in virtue epistemology is to be found in Leibniz-Wolffian rationalism. For philosophers from Wolff to Lessing, epistemology was thoroughly normative; that is, the task of epistemology was not to describe knowledge, but set rules for the amelioration of knowledge. Such a normative stance was transferred into cognate disciplines, such as aesthetics, as well. I further argue that after Kant’s Copernican revolution in philosophy in 1781 strands of this (...)
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  20. added 2019-04-22
    X—Epistemology Past and Present.John Carriero - 2013 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (2pt2):175-200.
    ABSTRACTI draw attention to certain differences between how seventeenth‐century philosophers thought about knowledge and how contemporary philosophers think about it. These differences do not strike me as particularly subtle; they are gross enough that we might wonder about the extent to which seventeenthth‐century philosophers and modern philosophers are interested in the same thing. We might also wonder about the extent to which it is helpful to apply the same label—say, ‘epistemology’—to both sets of interests. I think, for example, one might (...)
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  21. added 2019-04-22
    Meditaciones Sobre El Conocimiento, la Verdad y Las Ideas.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 2012 - Disputatio. Philosophical Research Bulletin 1 (2):113--123.
    [ES] En este breve trabajo, se presenta una edición bilingüe de Meditationes de cognitione, vertitate et ideis, de Leibniz. La importancia de este texto radica en que aquí se presentan, por vez primera, los elementos básicos de su teoría del conocimiento. [EN] In this brief article, a bilingual edition of Leibniz’s 1684 essay Meditationes de cognitione, vertitate et ideis is presented. The importance of this text rest in the fact that, for the first time, the basic elements of his theory (...)
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  22. added 2019-04-22
    Sur la conformité de la foi avec la raison : Leibniz contre Bayle.Paul Rateau - 2011 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 136 (4):467-485.
    En commençant les Essais de Théodicée par un Discours de la conformité de la foi avec la raison, Leibniz montrait que l'enjeu fondamental de sa confrontation avec Bayle était l'unité de la vérité. Pour produire un discours rationnel sur Dieu, ses attributs, sa providence, il était indispensable de répondre à celui qui disqualifiait par avance tout essai de justification de Dieu par la raison, en affirmant son impuissance radicale à établir des vérités solides et son divorce d'avec la foi. L'opposition (...)
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  23. added 2019-04-22
    Locke's Theory Knowledge and its Historical Relations.James Gibson - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke is probably one of the highest-regarded English philosophers, and the first of the British empiricists. His ideas on the mind and consciousness have continued to resonate throughout philosophy and philosophical thought ever since An Essay Concerning Human Understanding first appeared in 1690. James Gibson's Locke's Theory of Knowledge and its Historical Relations was first published in 1917, and saw its fourth reprinting in 1968. Here, it is made available for the first time in paperback. This hugely detailed work (...)
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  24. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz and the Knowledge Argument.David Scott - 2010 - Modern Schoolman 87 (2):117-141.
  25. added 2019-04-22
    Leibnizjańska Wizja Oświeconej Społeczności.Halina Święczkowska - 2008 - Folia Philosophica 26:349--363.
    The article is an attempt to present a 17th century vision of the programme of building the enlightened society proposed by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Inventorying of human knowledge and common access to it were one of his life aims. The condition of their realization was a rebuilt and reinforcement of the German language – largely weakened in the second part of the 17th century as a result of the French culture domination as a tool serving the purpose of discovery and (...)
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  26. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz über Begriffe und ihr Verhältnis zu den Sinnen (Leibniz on Concepts and Their Relation to the Senses).Stephen Puryear - 2008 - In Dominik Perler & Markus Wild (eds.), Sehen und Begreifen: Wahrnehmungstheorien in der Frühen Neuzeit. de Gruyter. pp. 235-264.
    Despite holding that all concepts are strictly speaking innate, Leibniz attempts to accommodate the common belief that at least some concepts are adventitious by appealing to his theory of ideal action. The essential idea is that an innate concept can be considered adventitious, in a sense, just in case its ideal cause is to be found outside the mind of the one who possesses the concept. I explore this attempt at accommodation and argue that it fails. [See external link for (...)
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  27. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz on Rational Decision-Making.Markku Roinila - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Helsinki
    In this study I discuss G. W. Leibniz's (1646-1716) views on rational decision-making from the standpoint of both God and man. The Divine decision takes place within creation, as God freely chooses the best from an infinite number of possible worlds. While God's choice is based on absolutely certain knowledge, human decisions on practical matters are mostly based on uncertain knowledge. However, in many respects they could be regarded as analogous in more complicated situations. In addition to giving an overview (...)
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  28. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz on Locke on Mathematical Knowledge.Emily Carson - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:21-46.
  29. added 2019-04-22
    A Fundamental Ambiguity In The Cartesian Theory Of Ideas: Descartes And Leibniz On Intellectual Apprehension/ Uma Ambiguidade Fundamental Na Teoria Cartesiana Das Idéias: Descartes E Leibniz Sobre A Apreensão Intelectual.Graciela De Pierris - 2007 - Manuscrito 30 (2):383-422.
    Traditionally the modern theory of ideas has been discussed primarily in reference to its alleged introduction of a veil of mental items between the mind and the world, which leads, through the empiricists, to radical skepticism about the existence of an external world. Here I propose to emphasize an entirely different aspect of the Cartesian theory of ideas which, in my view, is more fundamental in opening the empiricist path that leads to Hume’s radical skepticism. I argue that what I (...)
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  30. added 2019-04-22
    The Rationalists: Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz.Pauline Phemister - 2006 - Polity.
    Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz stand out among their seventeenth-century contemporaries as the great rationalist philosophers. Each sought to construct a philosophical system in which theological and philosophical foundations serve to explain the physical, mental and moral universe. Through a careful analysis of their work, Pauline Phemister explores the rationalists seminal contribution to the development of modern philosophy. Broad terminological agreement and a shared appreciation of the role of reason in ethics do not mask the very significant disagreements that led to (...)
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  31. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz and the Shelf of Essence.Brandon C. Look - 2005 - The Leibniz Review 15:27-47.
    This paper addresses D. C. Williams’s question, “How can Leibniz know that he is a member of the actual world and not merely a possible monad on the shelf of essence?” A variety of answers are considered. Ultimately, it is argued that no particular perception of a state of affairs in the world can warrant knowledge of one’s actuality, nor can the awareness of any property within oneself; rather, it is the nature of experience itself, with the flow of perceptions, (...)
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  32. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz and the Shelf of Essence.Brandon C. Look - 2005 - The Leibniz Review 15:27-47.
    This paper addresses D. C. Williams’s question, “How can Leibniz know that he is a member of the actual world and not merely a possible monad on the shelf of essence?” A variety of answers are considered. Ultimately, it is argued that no particular perception of a state of affairs in the world can warrant knowledge of one’s actuality, nor can the awareness of any property within oneself; rather, it is the nature of experience itself, with the flow of perceptions, (...)
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  33. added 2019-04-22
    Was Leibniz Confused About Confusion?Stephen M. Puryear - 2005 - The Leibniz Review 15:95-124.
    Leibniz’s mechanistic reduction of colors and other sensible qualities commits him to two theses about our knowledge of those qualities: first, that we can acquire ideas of sensible qualities apart from any direct acquaintance with the qualities themselves; second, that we can acquire distinct (i.e., non-confused) ideas of such qualities through the development of physical-theoretical accounts. According to some commentators, however, Leibniz frequently denies both claims. His views on the subject are muddled and incoherent, they say, both because he is (...)
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  34. added 2019-04-22
    Divine Omniscience and Human Evil: Interpreting Leibniz Without Middle Knowledge.Jill Graper Hernandez - 2005 - Philosophy and Theology 17 (1/2):107-120.
    The ‘middle knowledge’ doctrine salvages free will and divine omniscience by contending that God knows what agents will freely choose under any possible circumstances. I argue, however, that the Leibnizian problem of divine knowledge of human evil is best resolved by applying a Theodicy II distinction between determined, foreseen, and resolved action. This move eliminates deference to middle knowledge. Contingent action is indeed free, but not all action is contingent, and so not all action is free. For Leibniz, then, God’s (...)
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  35. added 2019-04-22
    The Idea of the Academy as the Universal Society of Knowledge in Leibniz.S. Ciurlia - 2004 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 96 (2-3):305-332.
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  36. added 2019-04-22
    Vers la “doctrine de l’entendement en abrégé” : éléments pour une généalogie des Meditationes de cognitione, veritate et ideis.Marine Picon - 2003 - Studia Leibnitiana 35 (1):102 - 132.
    The purpose of this paper is to try and understand what Leibniz is up to in his 1684 Meditations on Knowledge, Truth and Ideas. A close reading of the text shows that, by composing it, Leibniz casts into a new, systematic shape, a number of epistemological concepts, insights or tenets which had gradually emerged, in relative independence from one another, in his writings of the previous eight years (approximately since 1676, the last year of his stay in Paris, which was (...)
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  37. added 2019-04-22
    God’s Decrees and Middle Knowledge: Leibniz and the Jesuits.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):647-670.
    During the seventeenth century, disputes over middle knowledge centered on the following question: does God know contingent states of affairs before He decrees to bring them about ; or, conversely, does He know them after He has decreed which states of affairs He will bring about? This article intends to cast some light on Leibniz’s view of this question. Of central importance here is the notion of a possible decree. Despite his apparent proximity to the Dominican view, Leibniz maintained the (...)
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  38. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz on God’s Knowledge of Counterfactuals.Michael V. Griffin - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (3):317-343.
    In the eleventh chapter of Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus says to the inhabitants of Bethsaida and Corozain: “If the miracles worked in you had taken place in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes”. Passages like this support a scriptural argument for God’s knowledge of counterfactuals about created individuals. In the sixteenth century, Jesuits and Dominicans vigorously debated about how to explain this knowledge. The Jesuits, notably Luis de Molina and Francisco Suarez, argued that the (...)
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  39. added 2019-04-22
    St. Thomas, Molina and Leibniz on Divine Providence and Foreknowledge.Michael Vance Griffin - 1997 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    In this dissertation I examine Leibniz's theories of divine providence and foreknowledge in the context of the two main competing accounts available in his day, Molinism and Thomism. I argue that although his theories share some of the broad features of these two accounts, Leibniz departs substantially from the views of his predecessors. I show how Leibniz is able to account for divine foreknowledge and providence in a way that avoids some of the major problems facing the Molinists and the (...)
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  40. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz, Middle Knowledge, and the Intricacies of World Design.Sven K. Knebel - 1996 - Studia Leibnitiana 28 (2):199-210.
    Im Zentrum des Streits zwischen Leibniz und Arnauld um die individuellen Begriffe steht die theologische Frage, ob sich dergleichen nur auf der Basis von Gottes Wirklichkeitswissen konzipieren läßt oder nicht. Arnauld behauptet das, Leibniz als Molinist bestreitet es. Nun war aber erstens die Reichweite der Scientia Media für die göttliche Weltplanung unter den Jesuiten des 17. Jahrhunderts selbst kontrovers. Zweitens hat Leibniz von den Gegnern der These, die göttliche Weltplanung komme mit der Scientia Media aus, bestimmte Ideen auch übernommen . (...)
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  41. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz: New Essays on Human Understanding.Peter Remnant & Jonathan Bennett (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the New Essays on Human Understanding, Leibniz argues chapter by chapter with John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, challenging his views about knowledge, personal identity, God, morality, mind and matter, nature versus nurture, logic and language, and a host of other topics. The work is a series of sharp, deep discussions by one great philosopher of the work of another. Leibniz's references to his contemporaries and his discussions of the ideas and institutions of the age make this a fascinating (...)
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  42. added 2019-04-22
    Untying the Knot: Leibniz on God's Knowledge of Future Free Contingents.Jack D. Davidson - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):89 - 116.
  43. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz: New Essays on Human Understanding.Peter Remnant & Jonathan Bennett (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the New Essays on Human Understanding, Leibniz argues chapter by chapter with John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, challenging his views about knowledge, personal identity, God, morality, mind and matter, nature versus nurture, logic and language, and a host of other topics. The work is a series of sharp, deep discussions by one great philosopher of the work of another. Leibniz's references to his contemporaries and his discussions of the ideas and institutions of the age make this a fascinating (...)
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  44. added 2019-04-22
    6 The Theory of Knowledge.Robert McRae - 1995 - In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge University Press. pp. 176.
  45. added 2019-04-22
    Leibniz on Innate Knowledge of Moral Truth.Candace Goad - 1992 - Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (1):109-117.
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  46. added 2019-04-22
    Locke and Leibniz: The Innateness Debate.Candice Shelby Goad - 1991 - Dissertation, Rice University
    One fundamental difference between the epistemic views of Locke and Leibniz as represented in Leibniz's New Essays on Human Understanding concerns the issue of innate ideas and knowledge. In countering Locke's arguments that innate ideas and/or knowledge are neither necessary nor even possible, Leibniz offers a defense of the doctrine which evidently presumes that Locke's objections are the result of a misapprehension. Once properly understood, Leibniz suggests, the doctrine of innateness reveals itself to be not only reasonable but indeed absolutely (...)
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  47. added 2019-04-22
    The Light of the Soul: Theories of Ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes.Nicholas Jolley - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    The concept of an "idea" played a central role in 17th-century theories of mind and knowledge, but philosophers were divided over the nature of ideas. This book examines an important, but little-known, debate on this question in the work of Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Looking closely at the issues involved, as well as the particular context in which the debate took place, Jolley demonstrates that the debate has serious implications for a number of major topics in 17th-century philosophy.
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  48. added 2019-04-22
    The Light of the Soul: Theories of Ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes.Nicholas Jolley - 1990 - Clarendon Press.
    The Light of the Soul examines the debate between Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes on the nature of ideas, which was crucial to the development of early modern thinking about the mind and knowledge. Nicholas Jolley guides the reader through the debate and considers its implications for a broad range of issues, such as innate ideas, self-knowledge, scepticism, the mind-body problem, and the creation of the eternal truths, which are as important to philosophy today as they were in the seventeenth century.
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  49. added 2019-04-22
    Ein harmonikales Analogon: Leibniz'Stammbaum-Modell in der Dissertatio de arte combinatoria.Werner Schulze - 1987 - Studia Leibnitiana 19 (1):98-116.
    The Lambdoma, considered the most important harmonical pattern of order is to be understood as a further development of a figure attributed to the Pythagoreans "in the shape of the capital letter Lambda" -therefore named Lambda . Diagrams similar to the Lambdoma without explicit harmonical significance can be found in the writings of several medieval and modern authors, including Ramon Llull , whose influence on Leibniz is already evident in the Dissertatio de arte combinatoria , Leipzig 1666. Leibniz and Llull (...)
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  50. added 2019-04-22
    Ars Inveniendi bei Leibniz.Cornelis-Anthonie van Peursen - 1986 - Studia Leibnitiana 18:183.
    A scientific and political policy of innovation, according to Leibniz, has to start with the programmatic distincton between knowledge already available and knowledge still to be discovered . Gradually both, synthetic and analytic methods, can serve invention. If deduction is used. e. g. by combining tones to all possible musical themes, a further selection is nevertheless necessary. Human genius, gifted with imagination, can be compared with a sieve . Selection becomes the mark of contingency within the network of rationality. In (...)
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