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  1. Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought.Maria Rosa Antognazza - forthcoming - In Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  2. Leibniz’s Philosophy as a Way of Life?Paul Lodge - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (2-3):259-279.
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  3. Leibniz's Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide.Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents introductory chapters from internationally-renowned experts on eleven of Leibniz's key philosophical writings. Offering accessible accounts of the ideas and arguments of his work, along with information on their composition and context, this book is an invaluable companion to the study of Leibniz.
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  4. Leibniz on Slavery and the Ownership of Human Beings.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (10):1–18.
    Leibniz puts forward an intriguing argument against the moral permissibility of chattel slavery in a text from 1703. This argument has three independent layers or sub-arguments. The first is that slavery violates natural rights. The second is that moral laws such as the principles of equity and piety oppose slavery, or at least severely limit the permissible actions toward slaves. The third and final layer is that slavery can at most be justified if the slave is permanently incapable of conducting (...)
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  5. Common Notions and Instincts as Sources of Moral Knowledge in Leibniz’s New Essays on Human Understanding.Markku Roinila - 2019 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 8 (1):141-170.
    In his defense of innateness in New Essays on Human Understanding (1704), Leibniz attributes innateness to concepts and principles which do not originate from the senses rather than to the ideas that we are born with. He argues that the innate concepts and principles can be known in two ways: through reason or natural light (necessary truths), and through instincts (other innate truths and principles). In this paper I will show how theoretical and moral reasoning differ from each other in (...)
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  6. The New Method of Learning and Teaching Jurisprudence, According to the Principles of the Didactic Art Premised in the General Part and in the Light of Experience.Christopher Johns - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:109-117.
  7. Iustitia Ut Caritas Sapientis: The Relationship Between Love and Justice in G.W. Leibniz’s Philosophy of Right.Aleksandra Horowska - 2017 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 65 (2):185-204.
    The purpose of this paper is an attempt to present and analyse one of the most intriguing and unique elements of Leibniz’s philosophy of right—the relationship between love and justice —mainly based on selected excerpts from the Elementa Iuris Naturalis and the preface to the Codex Iuris Gentium Diplomaticus. The author presents the characteristics of this close connection and she tries to answer the question about the reasons for this relationship referring to the metaphysical assumptions and principles of Leibniz’s philosophy. (...)
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  8. Leibniz on Causation and Agency.Julia Jorati - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive examination of Gottfried Leibniz's views on the nature of agents and their actions. Julia Jorati offers a fresh look at controversial topics including Leibniz's doctrines of teleology, the causation of spontaneous changes within substances, divine concurrence, freedom, and contingency, and also discusses widely neglected issues such as his theories of moral responsibility, control, attributability, and compulsion. Rather than focusing exclusively on human agency, she explores the activities of non-rational substances and the differences between distinctive types (...)
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  9. Spatial Aspects of Moral Judgements in Lawyers’ Heaven, Peoples’ Earth and Malefactors’ Hell: Leibniz, the Austro-Marxists and Durkheim’s Alleged ‘Disintegration’ Thesis.Mate Pasky - 2017 - Otrosiglo 1 (2):67-89.
    Ever since antiquity, lawyers and philosophers have essentially been divided over whether they should keep law, morality and politics separate, or whether the need for their unity is more compelling. In the wake of countless bloody conflicts worldwide, the durability and resilience of this discourse on laws and morals is at once both impressive and sad. The aim of this paper is to show that individual moral deliberation is essentially local and cannot be dissociated from the spatial-communitarian context – neither (...)
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  10. Leibniz on Unbaptized Infant Damnation.Christopher Bobier - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (2):185-194.
    Leibniz consistently denies that unbaptized infants are condemned to hell in virtue of original sin. He is less than forthcoming, however, about where they go when they die. Scholars are divided on this issue. Some think that, according to Leibniz, they go to limbo, while others think that he is committed to the view that they go to heaven. The aim of this paper is to show that this scholarly attention is misguided and that Leibniz does not defend a position (...)
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  11. Leibniz on the Ground of Moral Normativity and Obligation.Gregory Brown - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:11-62.
    My aim in this paper is to elucidate Leibniz’s account of moral normativity and the relation between motivation and obligation. I argue against the recent interpretation of Christopher Johns, according to which Leibniz’s moral theory is actually a deontological theory, having more in common with Kantian moral theory than with any form of consequentialism. I argue that for Leibniz reason is not itself the source of practical normativity and real obligation; the source of that is rather the agent’s desire for (...)
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  12. Was Leibniz An Egoist?Jennifera Frey - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):601-624.
    the prevailing consensus among leibniz scholars is that Leibniz’s rational psychology is thoroughly egoist.1 To take a recent and especially prominent example, Nicholas Jolley compares Leibniz to his philosophical adversaries Hobbes and Spinoza in just this respect. He writes,Leibniz is as uncompromising as they are in maintaining that no one deliberately does anything except for the sake of his own welfare, for one seeks the good even of those whom we love for the sake of the pleasure we derive from (...)
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  13. Leibniz and Probability in the Moral Domain.Chris Meyns - 2016 - In Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 229-253.
    Leibniz’s account of probability has come into better focus over the past decades. However, less attention has been paid to a certain domain of application of that account, that is, the application of it to the moral or ethical domain—the sphere of action, choice and practice. This is significant, as Leibniz had some things to say about applying probability theory to the moral domain, and thought the matter quite relevant. Leibniz’s work in this area is conducted at a high level (...)
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  14. The Battle of the Endeavors: Dynamics of the Mind and Deliberation in New Essays on Human Understanding, Book II, Xx-Xxi.Markku Roinila - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), “Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer”. Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses, Hannover, 18. – 23. Juli 2016. G. Olms. pp. Band V, 73-87.
    In New Essays on Human Understanding, book II, chapter xxi Leibniz presents an interesting picture of the human mind as not only populated by perceptions, volitions and appetitions, but also by endeavours. The endeavours in question can be divided to entelechy and effort; Leibniz calls entelechy as primitive active forces and efforts as derivative forces. The entelechy, understood as primitive active force is to be equated with a substantial form, as Leibniz says: “When an entelechy – i.e. a primary or (...)
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  15. Leibniz's Passionate Knowledge.Markku Roinila - 2016 - Blityri (1/2 2015):75-85.
    In §18 of Principles of Nature and Grace, Based on Reason, Leibniz says: ”Thus our happiness will never consist, and must never consist, in complete joy, in which nothing is left to desire, and which would dull our mind, but must consist in a perpetual progress to new pleasures and new perfections.” -/- This passage is typical in Leibniz’s Nachlass. Universal perfection creates in us joy or pleasure of the mind and its source is our creator, God. When this joy (...)
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  16. How Sincere Was Leibniz’s Religious Justification for War in the Justa Dissertatio?Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer (volume 5). Hildesheim: Georg Olms. pp. 401-412.
    This paper is concerned with Leibniz’s Egypt Plan, written in 1671 and 1672, when Leibniz was in the service of the Elector of Mainz. One of the aims of this paper is to offer a more balanced and plausible reading of the religious benefits of war that Leibniz outlines in his Egypt plan.
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  17. Gewissen. Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven auf das 18. Jahrhundert.Katerina Mihaylova & Simon Bunke - 2015 - Würzburg, Deutschland: Königshausen & Neumann.
  18. On Hypothetical Judgements and Leibniz’s Notion of Conditional Right.Shahid Rahman - 2015 - In Sandrine Chassagnard-Pinet, Patrice Canivez & Matthias Armgardt (eds.), Past and Present Interactions in Legal Reasoning and Logic. Springer Verlag.
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  19. Leibniz’s Metaphysical Evil Revisited.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2014 - In Samuel Newlands Larry Jorgensen (ed.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford University Press. pp. 112-134.
    The category of metaphysical evil introduced by Leibniz appears to cast a sinister shadow over the goodness of creation. It seems to imply that creatures, simply in virtue of not being gods, are to some degree intrinsically and inescapably evil. After briefly unpacking this difficulty and outlining a recent attempt to deal with it, this paper returns to the texts to propose a novel and multilayered understanding of Leibniz’s category of metaphysical evil by reading it against the backdrop of the (...)
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  20. Leibniz and the Square: A Deontic Logic for the Vir Bonus.Chris Johns - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (4):369-376.
    Seventeenth century philosopher Gottfried Leibniz's contributions to metaphysics, mathematics, and logic are well known. Lesser known is his ‘invention’ of deontic logic, and that his invention derives from the alethic logic of the Aristotelian square of opposition. In this paper, I show how Leibniz developed this ‘logic of duties’, which designates actions as ‘possible, necessary, impossible, and omissible’ for a ‘vir bonus’ . I show that for Leibniz, deontic logic can determine whether a given action, e.g. as permitted, is therefore (...)
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  21. Leibniz's Twofold Gap Between Moral Knowledge and Motivation.Julia Jorati - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):748-766.
    Moral rationalists and sentimentalists traditionally disagree on at least two counts, namely regarding the source of moral knowledge or moral judgements and regarding the source of moral motivation. I will argue that even though Leibniz's moral epistemology is very much in line with that of mainstream moral rationalists, his account of moral motivation is better characterized as sentimentalist. Just like Hume, Leibniz denies that there is a necessary connection between knowing that something is right and the motivation to act accordingly. (...)
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  22. Leibniz’ “Monadologie” 1714-2014.Patrick Riley - 2014 - The Leibniz Review 24:1-27.
    It is well-known that Leibniz ends and crowns the 1714 “Monadologie” with a version of his notion of jurisprudence universelle or “justice as the charity [love] of the wise:” for sections 83-90 of the Vienna manuscript claim that “the totality of all spirits must compose the City of God . . . this perfect government . . . the most perfect state that is possible . . . this truly universal monarchy [which is] a moral world in the natural world”—a (...)
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  23. Leibniz, Pufendorf, and the Possibility of Moral Self-Governance.Christopher Johns - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):281 - 301.
    (2013). Leibniz, Pufendorf, and the Possibility of Moral Self-Governance. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 281-301. doi: 10.1080/09608788.2012.693064.
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  24. Leibniz and the Amour Pur Controversy.Markku Roinila - 2013 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 2 (2):35-55.
    The topic of disinterested love became fashionable in 1697 due to the famous amour pur dispute between Fénelon (1651-1715) and Bossuet (1627-1704). It soon attracted the attention of Electress Sophie of Hanover (1630-1714) and she asked for an opinion about the dispute from her trusted friend and correspondent, the Hanoverian councilor Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). This gave Leibniz an opportunity to present his views on the matter, which he had developed earlier in his career (for example, in Elementa juris naturalis (...)
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  25. Locke and Leibniz on the Balance of Reasons.Markku Roinila - 2013 - In Dana Riesenfeld & Giovanni Scarafile (eds.), Perspectives on Theory of Controversies and the Ethics of Communication. Springer. pp. 49-57.
    One of the features of John Locke’s moral philosophy is the idea that morality is based on our beliefs concerning the future good. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding II, xxi, §70, Locke argues that we have to decide between the probability of afterlife and our present temptations. In itself, this kind of decision model is not rare in Early Modern philosophy. Blaise Pascal’s Wager is a famous example of a similar idea of balancing between available options which Marcelo Dascal (...)
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  26. Leibniz on Hope.Markku Roinila - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 161.
    G. W. Leibniz famously proclaimed that this is the best of all possible worlds. One of the properties of the best world is its increasing perfection. He gave a prominent role in his discussion of emotions to hope which is related to intellectual activity such as curiosity and courage which again is essential for the practice of science and promoting the common good. Leibniz regarded hope as a process where minute perceptions in the mind, that is, unconscious promises or signs (...)
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  27. Leibniz on Usucaption, Presumption, and International Justice.Andreas Blank - 2011 - Studia Leibnitiana 43 (1):70-86.
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  28. Disinterested Love: Understanding Leibniz's Reconciliation of Self- and Other-Regarding Motives.Gregory Brown - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):265-303.
    While he was in the employ of the Elector of Mainz, between 1668 and 1671, Leibniz produced a series of important studies in natural law. One of these, dated between 1670 and 1671, is especially noteworthy since it contains Leibniz's earliest sustained attempt to develop an account of justice. Central to this account is the notion of what Leibniz would later come to call `disinterested love', a notion that remained essentially unchanged in Leibniz's work from this period to the end (...)
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  29. Leibniz'Mediterranean Ethics: The Graeco-Roman Foundations of Iustitia Caritas Sapientis.Patrick Riley - 2011 - Studia Leibnitiana 43 (1):5-23.
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  30. Patrick Riley’s Leibniz.David Lay Williams - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:1-8.
    This essay clarifies Patrick Riley’s account of G. W. Leibniz by placing Leibniz’s moral and political doctrines in historical perspective. By understanding Leibniz’s practical philosophy as a solution to the same problems confronted by Thomas Hobbes, one can appreciate the originality and appeal of Riley’s Leibniz — with its emphasis on benevolence and Platonic ideas. By drawing attention to Leibniz’s practical works, Riley has resurrected an important voice in the history of political thought that had been long neglected. The essay (...)
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  31. Leibniz and the Science of Happiness.Roger Caldwell - 2010 - Philosophy Now 78:25-27.
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  32. Leibniz's Critique of Pufendorf A Dispute in the Eve of the Enlightenment.Detlef Doring - 2010 - In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), The Practice of Reason: Leibniz and His Controversies. John Benjamins. pp. 7--245.
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  33. The Golden Rule: Aspects of Leibniz's Method for Religious Controversy.Mogens Laerke - 2010 - In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), The Practice of Reason: Leibniz and His Controversies. John Benjamins. pp. 7--297.
  34. Leibniz ja Eythyfronin dilemma.Markku Roinila - 2010 - In Kristian Klockars, Ilkka Niiniluoto & Kristina Rolin (eds.), Oikeus. University of Helsinki.
    Julkaisematta jääneessä muistiossaan Mietteitä oikeuden yleiskäsitteestä (1702-1703?) G. W. Leibniz muotoilee uudelleen Platonin Euthyfron-dialogissa esitetyn kuuluisan kysymyksen. Hän kirjoittaa: ”Myönnetään, että kaikki mitä Jumala tahtoo, on hyvää ja oikein. Sen sijaan kysytään, onko se hyvää ja oikein siksi että Jumala niin tahtoo, vai tahtooko Jumala sitä koska se on hyvää ja oikein. Eli kysytään, onko hyvyys tai oikeus jotakin mielivaltaista, vai koostuvatko ne asioiden luonnetta koskevista välttämättömistä ja ikuisista totuuksista, kuten luvut ja suhteet.” Universaaleja, ikuisia totuuksia puolustava filosofi ei voi (...)
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  35. Leibniz Über Toleranz Und Wahrheit.Ursula Goldenbaum - 2009 - In Erich Barke, Rolf Wernstedt & Herbert Breger (eds.), Leibniz Neu Denken. F. Steiner.
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  36. The Grounds of Right and Obligation in Leibniz and Hobbes.Christopher Johns - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (3):551-574.
    This paper maintains that Hobbes grounds right and obligation in self-interest, and opposes a recent argument that for Hobbes obligation is grounded in the agent’s practical deliberation. In addition, it maintains that for Leibniz right and obligation are grounded in the moral-rational capacity of persons, but not in self-interest. It proceeds by distinguishing among the various senses of jus or “right,” and contrasting Hobbes’s and Leibniz’s understanding of the term—though both see it as a kind of freedom they differ fundamentally (...)
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  37. Leibniz on Self-Punishment and Avenging Justice.G. Mormino - 2009 - In Mark Kulstad, Mogens Laerke & David Snyder (eds.), The Philosophy of the Young Leibniz. Steiner. pp. 129--138.
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  38. Leibnizin rationaalisen päätöksenteon mallit.Markku Roinila - 2009 - Ajatus 66:39-60.
    Artikkelissaan ”The Balance of Reason” Marcelo Dascal on osoittanut, että metafora syiden punnitsemisesta järjen vaa’assa on yleinen Leibnizin kirjoituksissa ja sitä on pidettävä hänen yleisenä järkeilyn metodinaan tilanteissa, joissa ei voida suorittaa täydellistä loogista analyysiä. Keskustelen tässä esitelmässä tuosta metaforasta ja ehdotan Jaakko Hintikan ja Simo Knuuttilan aiempien esityksien pohjalle rakentaen, että käsityksissään ihmisen praktisesta rationaalisuudesta Leibniz sovelsi myös toista melko tuntemattomaksi jäänyttä heuristista päätöksentekomallia, joka liittyy hänen työhönsä luonnonfilosofiassa ja mielenfilosofiassa, ja jota hän sovelsi tapauksissa joissa päätökseen vaikuttavat arvot (...)
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  39. The World is a Mirror of the Self.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - In Transformation of the Self in the thought of Schleiermacher. Oxford University Press.
    This is the fourth chapter of Transformation of the Self. In it I explore Schleiermacher's reception of Leibniz in the Monologen.
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  40. Innate Ideas as the Cornerstone of Rationalism: The Problem of Moral Principles in Leibniz's Nouveaux Essais.Hans Poser - 2008 - In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Leibniz: What Kind of Rationalist? Springer. pp. 479--493.
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  41. Socio-Political Ideals. Leibniz's Principles of a Just Social Policy.Kiyoshi Sakai - 2008 - Studia Leibnitiana 40 (2):153-167.
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  42. Sozialpolitische Leitbilder. Leibniz' Grundsätze einer gerechten Sozialpolitik.Kiyoshi Sakai - 2008 - Studia Leibnitiana 40 (2):153 - 167.
    The cause of (if not the solution for) the growing social gap and a certain impasse in today's society may be found in the increasingly globalised market economy as well as in the changes in traditional social systems that have hitherto been relatively stable. This free economy has its roots in a genealogy of "liberalism" that is typically represented by John Locke, who advocated the individual's unlimited economic activity in England and America of the 17th century. In contrast to this (...)
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  43. Contingent Propositions and Leibniz's Analysis of Juridical Dispositions.Evelyn Vargas - 2008 - In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Leibniz: What Kind of Rationalist? Springer. pp. 267--278.
  44. Leibniz's Ethics.Andrew Youpa - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  45. Selecting a Phenomenalism: Leibniz, Berkeley, and the Science of Happiness.Laurence Carlin - 2007 - Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (1):57-78.
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  46. Leibniz's Social Quasi-Contract.Jérémie Griard - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (3):513 – 533.
  47. Perfection, Power and the Passions in Spinoza and Leibniz.Brandon C. Look - 2007 - Revue Roumaine de la Philosophie 51 (1-2):21-38.
    In a short piece written most likely in the 1690s and given the title by Loemker of “On Wisdom,” Leibniz says the following: “...we see that happiness, pleasure, love, perfection, being, power, freedom, harmony, order, and beauty are all tied to each other, a truth which is rightly perceived by few.”1 Why is this? That is, why or how are these concepts tied to each other? And, why have so few understood this relation? Historians of philosophy are familiar with the (...)
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  48. Kuvittelukyky ja moraalinen valinta Leibnizilla.Markku Roinila - 2007 - Niin and Näin (2):27-31.
    Kuvittelukyky tai imaginaatio esiintyy varsin harvoin Leibnizin kirjoituksissa ja siksi siitä ei ole kovin laajalti keskusteltu Leibniz-kommentaareissa ennen kuin aivan viime aikoina. Näissäkin tapauksissa keskustelu on pitkälti rajoittunut kuvittelukyvyn rooliin tiedostuksessa. Yritän tässä esitelmässä vetää sillan kuvittelukyvyn ja moraalisen toiminnan välille, jota tietääkseni ei ole ennen varsinaisesti tehty.
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  49. Leibniz and the Presumption of Justice.Andreas Blank - 2006 - Studia Leibnitiana 38 (2):209 - 218.
    In den Elementa juris naturalis behauptet Leibniz, dass es rational ist zu präsumieren, dass eine gegebene Handlung gerecht ist. Diese Behauptung scheint in Widerspruch zu seiner Auffassung zu stehen, dass das, was präsumiert wird, einfacher ist als sein Gegenteil. Nach Leibniz ist einfacher, was weniger Voraussetzungen hat als etwas anderes, wobei er zwischen logischen und ontologischen Voraussetzungen unterscheidet. Dieser Diskussionsbeitrag versucht zu zeigen, dass Voraussetzungen auf der ontologischen Ebene eine oft übersehene Rolle für die Präsumption der Gerechtigkeit einer Handlung spielen (...)
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  50. Leibniz on Justice as a Common Concept.Andreas Blank - 2006 - The Leibniz Review 16:205-214.
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