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Key works Lloyd Strickland's Leibniz on God and Religion: A Reader (2016) is a useful place to begin reading Leibniz's own work in the philosophy of religion.  This volume includes many short works and selections on topics ranging from the existence of God to the Bible and non-Christian religions. 
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  1. added 2020-05-22
    Leibniz Leitor de Anselmo: Um Caso Exemplar de Deslize Filosófico.Eliakim Ferreira Oliveira - 2019 - Cadernos Espinosanos 41:339-369.
    O artigo procura apresentar as modificações do clássico argumento da existência de Deus feitas por Leibniz nos textos _Novos ensaios sobre o entendimento humano _e _Meditações sobre o Conhecimento, a Verdade e as Ideias_. Defende-se que já há em Leibniz uma leitura "ontologizante" de Anselmo, cuja razão bem pode ser a apropriação cartesiana do argumento. O plano de fundo dessa discussão é a maneira como os filósofos, quando leem outros, na medida em que possuem suas próprias agendas filosóficas, cometem, intencionalmente (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-22
    Creación, nada y participación en Leibniz.Agustín Echevarría - 2013 - Pensamiento 69 (261):897-918.
    El presente artículo analiza el concepto leibniziano de «creación de la nada» desde una doble perspectiva. Por un lado, se expone el modelo esencialista de la creación, entendida como traslado de esencias desde el plano de la mera posibilidad al plano de la existencia, y las dificultades que este planteamiento supone, al devaluar la causalidad divina. Por otro, se expone el modelo «participacionista», según el cual toda la perfección de la criatura se encuentra en actual y radical dependencia de las (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-22
    La Question du mal chez Leibniz.Mogens Lærke - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:77-91.
    In this article, I discuss how Leibniz’s first correspondence with Malebranche from early 1676 can shed new light on the notorious “all-things-are-one”-passage found in the Quod ens perfectissimum sit possibile from late 1676—a passage that has been taken as an expression of monism or Spinozism in the young Leibniz. The correspondence with Malebranche provides a deeper understanding of Leibniz’s use of the notions of “real distinction” and “separability” in the ATOP. This forms the background for a discussion of Leibniz’s commitment (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-22
    Infinite Accumulations and Pantheistic Implications: Leibniz and the Anima Mundi.Laurence Carlin - 1997 - The Leibniz Review 7:1-24.
    Throughout his early writings, Leibniz was concerned with developing an acceptable account of God's relationship to the created world. In some of these early writings, he endorsed the idea that this relationship was similar to the human soul's relationship to the body. Though he eventually came to reject this idea, theanima mundi thesis remained the topic of several essays and correspondences during his career, culminating in the correspondence with Clarke. At first glance,Leibniz's discussions of this thesis may seem less important (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-13
    Création continuelle, concours divin et théodicée dans le débat Bayle-Jaquelot-Leibniz.Jean-Luc Solere - 2015 - In Chr. Leduc, P. Rateau and J.-L. Solère, eds., Leibniz et Bayle: Confrontation et Dialogue. Hanover, Germany: pp. 395-424.
  6. added 2020-05-13
    Theodicy Strategies in Leibniz, Hegel, Jonas.Vittorio Hösle - 2005 - Philotheos 5:68-86.
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  7. added 2020-05-13
    Christia Mercer on the Early Leibniz: A Review Essay on Leibniz’s Metaphysics.Michael J. Murray - 2005 - Philosophia Christi 7 (1):189-198.
  8. added 2020-04-27
    False Enemies: Malebranche, Leibniz, and the Best of All Possible Worlds.Emanuela Scribano - 2004 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 1. New-York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 165-182.
    Leibniz's polemical aim against those who claim that God could have created a better world is not Malebranche but Suarez. In fact, Leibniz and Malebranche are united in traveling the road of the commensurability of the finite world with God, in opposition to the Thomist theology.
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  9. added 2020-03-13
    Not So Innocent - An Akratic Reading of Leibnizian “Judgment”.Oda Storbråten Davanger - 2013 - Stance 6:79-86.
    Leibniz seeks to establish the tenability of faith and reason in his moral philosophy through a tripod of thought, consisting of 1) fundamental human goodness; 2) human error in judgment; and 3) that God is just. A difficulty arises concerning how God can justly punish human beings if they always will what is Good. By considering akrasia, which occurs when error is committed despite its clear nonconformity with the Good, and examining the Leibnizian concept of “judgment,” Leibniz’s tripod can be (...)
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  10. added 2020-03-09
    Leibniz and Spinozist Necessitarianism.Ari Maunu - 2018 - Studia Leibnitiana 48 (2):261-267.
    It is sometimes argued that Leibniz’s metaphysical commitments lead to Spinozist Necessitarianism, i.e., the view, in Spinoza’s words, that “Things could not have been produced by God in any way or in any order other than that in which they have been produced”. Leibniz comments on this passage as follows: “This proposition may be true or false, depending on how it is explained”. I suggest in this paper that what Leibniz means by this comment can be fleshed out by making (...)
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  11. added 2020-01-03
    Reasoning of the Highest Leibniz and the Moral Quality of Reason.Ryan Quandt - 2019 - Dissertation, University of South Florida
    Loving God is our highest perfection for Leibniz. It secures our belief and trust in the Creator, which is integral to the sciences as well as faith. Those who love God have justification for reasoning, that is, they can rationally expect to arrive at truth. This is because love is a receptivity to the perfection all of things; loving God, then, is a disposition and tendency toward the most perfect being, the ens perfectissimum. Individuals who perceive the divine nature “do (...)
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  12. added 2019-12-03
    Leibniz's Worlds. The Connection Between the Best Possible World and the Monadic Realm.Jan Levin Propach - forthcoming - Synthesis Philosophica.
    In this paper I claim that in Leibniz’s metaphysics we can use the term ‘world’ in a twofold sense. On the one hand to refer to highly complex divine thoughts, i.e. the ideal realm, and on the other hand to refer to a network of living substances with their perceptions and appetitions, i.e. the substantial realm. First of all, I will clarify the ideal realm in Leibniz's metaphysics, which consists of three combinatorial levels about the fundamental entities, namely the simple (...)
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  13. added 2019-12-03
    How to Distinguish Secondary From Primary Creations? A Leibnizian Elucidation of a Distinction by J.R.R. Tolkien.Jan Levin Propach - 2020 - Hither Shore 14 (1):34-45.
    Tolkien uses the terms “primary creation” and “secondary creation” in his works with reference to divine and human creation respectively. In the first part of this paper, I argue that one criterion to distinguish the former from the latter is their completeness or incompleteness. The primary creation is complete because it is thought of and created by God. The secondary creations like human fictions are incomplete since the human intellect is finite and does not have the capacity to grasp the (...)
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  14. added 2019-12-03
    Ideen bei Leibniz. Das Verhältnis zwischen den Ideen im göttlichen Intellekt und den Ideen des menschlichen Geistes.Jan Levin Propach - 2019 - In Manfred Negele & Jan Levin Propach (eds.), Geist-Erfahrung. Ein Beitrag zu einem Erfahrungsbegriff für die Geisteswissenschaften. Würzburg, Deutschland: pp. 153-176.
    Leibniz di fferenziert zwischen den Ideen des göttlichen Intellekts und den Ideen im menschlichen Geist, bestimmt ihr Verhältnis aber als Ähnlichkeit. Der Grund dafür, dass es sich bei der Beziehung zwischen Ideen des göttlichen Geistes und den Ideen der mens nicht um Identität oder Teilhabe, sondern um Ähnlichkeit handelt, liegt unter anderem in der Schulphilosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts geläufi gen theologischen Imago-Dei-Lehre begründet. Der menschliche Geist ist demnach dem göttlichen Intellekt wegen der biblisch begründeten Gottebenbildlichkeit, trotz des Sündenfalls und der (...)
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  15. added 2019-12-03
    Leibniz’ Metaphysik der Modalität.Sebastian Bender - 2016 - Berlin & Boston: De Gruyter.
    Im Alltag äußern wir nicht nur Aussagen darüber, wie die Welt tatsächlich beschaffen ist, sondern auch darüber, was notwendigerweise oder möglicherweise der Fall ist. Doch worin ist die Wahrheit solcher sogenannten Modalaussagen fundiert? Auf diese Frage gibt Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz bereits in der Frühen Neuzeit eine höchst interessante Antwort: Für ihn sind modale Wahrheiten im Intellekt Gottes fundiert. Diese Modalitätskonzeption analysiert Sebastian Bender in der vorliegenden Studie auf systematisch informierte Weise. Dabei kommt er zu folgenden Ergebnissen: Erstens vertritt Leibniz, anders (...)
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  16. added 2019-12-03
    On Worlds, Laws and Tiles: Leibniz and the Problem of Compossibility.Sebastian Bender - 2016 - In Gregory Brown & Yual Chiek (eds.), Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds. pp. 65-90.
    Leibniz defends two apparently inconsistent doctrines. On the one hand, he holds that substances are independent entities and that God can, at least in principle, create any possible substance whatsoever no matter what else he creates. On the other hand, Leibniz insists that some possible substances are incompossible with one another and thus cannot coexist. I first discuss three attempts of dealing with this tension in Leibniz’s work that have recently been made in the literature: the logical approach, the lawful (...)
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  17. added 2019-10-15
    Leibniz's Horrendous and Unthinkable World: A Critique of Leibniz's ‘Best Possible World' Theodicy.Nicholas Hadsell - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
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  18. added 2019-09-10
    Leibniz's Legacy and Impact.Julia Weckend & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume tells the story of the legacy and impact of the great German polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Leibniz made significant contributions to many areas, including philosophy, mathematics, political and social theory, theology, and various sciences. The essays in this volume explores the effects of Leibniz’s profound insights on subsequent generations of thinkers by tracing the ways in which his ideas have been defended and developed in the three centuries since his death. Each of the 11 essays is concerned (...)
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  19. added 2019-07-08
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by Richard Arthur. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2020 - Mind 129 (514):664-673.
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by ArthurRichard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. ix + 329.
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  20. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz on the Divine Preformation of Souls and Bodies.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):327-342.
  21. added 2019-07-08
    Virtual Union, the Seeds of Hatred, and the Fraternal Joining of Hands: Leibniz and Toleration.Mogens Laerke - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):6.
    In this paper, I am interested in the conception of toleration that can be gleaned from the political and theological texts of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. I argue that Leibniz did not defend a notion of toleration comparable to a standard modern conception. The modern conception is very often traced back to a constellation of writers contemporary with Leibniz including Locke, Bayle, and Spinoza. It involves an inclusive embrace of diversity, religious and otherwise, and an affirmation of toleration as a fundamental (...)
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  22. added 2019-07-08
    Quod Non Omnia Possibilia Ad Existentiam Perveniant.Mogens Lærke - 2007 - The Leibniz Review 17:1-30.
    In the Nouveaux Essais, Leibniz famously declared that he once had “begun to lean towards” Spinozist necessitarianism. In this article, I argue that this remark refers to his modal philosophy anterior to 1677. Leibniz’s mature refutation of Spinoza’s necessitarianism relies on the notion that pure possibility has some sort of reality in God’s mind, because only this allows for a strong notion of divine choice. But I believe that Leibniz only developed this ontology of possibility after 1677. Before this date, (...)
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  23. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz on Wachter’s Elucidarius Cabalisticus: A Critical Edition of the so-Called ‘Réfutation de Spinoza’.Philip Beeley - 2002 - The Leibniz Review 12:1-8.
    When the translator and editor of the German edition of Bayle’s Historical and Critical Dictionary, Johann Christoph Gottsched, sug gested to Johann Georg Wachter that he supply an explanation of his views on Spinoza for inclusion in the eponymous article, he gladly obliged. Wachter, a failed university professor in Duisburg who had since managed to find employment in the council library in Gottsched’s adopted home town of Leipzig, had good reasons for doing this. Not only had his Elucidarius cabalisticus been (...)
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  24. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz on Wachter’s Elucidarius Cabalisticus: A Critical Edition of the so-Called ‘Réfutation de Spinoza’.Philip Beeley - 2002 - The Leibniz Review 12:1-8.
    When the translator and editor of the German edition of Bayle’s Historical and Critical Dictionary, Johann Christoph Gottsched, sug gested to Johann Georg Wachter that he supply an explanation of his views on Spinoza for inclusion in the eponymous article, he gladly obliged. Wachter, a failed university professor in Duisburg who had since managed to find employment in the council library in Gottsched’s adopted home town of Leipzig, had good reasons for doing this. Not only had his Elucidarius cabalisticus been (...)
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  25. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz on Wachter’s Elucidarius Cabalisticus: A Critical Edition of the so-Called ‘Réfutation de Spinoza’.Philip Beeley - 2002 - The Leibniz Review 12:1-8.
    When the translator and editor of the German edition of Bayle’s Historical and Critical Dictionary, Johann Christoph Gottsched, sug gested to Johann Georg Wachter that he supply an explanation of his views on Spinoza for inclusion in the eponymous article, he gladly obliged. Wachter, a failed university professor in Duisburg who had since managed to find employment in the council library in Gottsched’s adopted home town of Leipzig, had good reasons for doing this. Not only had his Elucidarius cabalisticus been (...)
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  26. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature. [REVIEW]Michael Losonsky - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):94-98.
    In this comprehensive study of Leibniz’s mature metaphysics, Donald Rutherford attempts to recover Leibniz’s theodicy as an essential part of his philosophy. Although Rutherford does not succeed in showing that the theodicy is essential to Leibniz’s metaphysics, he effectively uses the theodicy as an entry into Leibniz’s metaphysics and he highlights the many links between them. Of course, there are other significant ways of entering Leibniz’s philosophy—he wanted to “do justice to theology as to physics”—but Rutherford reminds us that Leibniz (...)
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  27. added 2019-07-08
    Optimalism and Axiological Metaphysics.Nicholas Rescher - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):807 - 835.
    What is perhaps the biggeist metaphysical question of them all was put on the agenda of philosophy by G. W. Leibniz: “Why is there anything at all?” This question is not only difficult to answer but poses difficulties in its very conception. After all, it is—or should be—-clear that such questions as “Why is there anything at all?” and “Why are things in general as they actually are?” and “Why are the laws of nature as they are?” cannot be answered (...)
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  28. added 2019-07-08
    Trinità e Incarnazione: Il rapporto tra filosofia a teologia rivelata nel pensiero di Leibniz.Robert Merrihew Adams - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:53-60.
    Christian theology is one of the most neglected areas of Leibniz’s thought. It is a subject that engaged his attention throughout his intellectual career. He seems to have been very well informed about the main currents of theological opinion in his own time, and to have had an extensive knowledge of historic doctrinal positions. He left behind a wealth of letters and unpublished papers discussing topics in revealed theology; but this resource for understanding both his own thought and the history (...)
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  29. added 2019-07-08
    The Proofs of the Existence of God: Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus as Precursors of Leibniz.Michael Latzer - 1997 - Modern Schoolman 74 (2):143-160.
  30. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist. [REVIEW]Susanna Goodin - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):143-143.
    Working under the structure of his three main topics of determinism, theism, and idealism, Adams has produced a work on Leibniz of outstanding significance. Adams deftly handles the massive historical resources now available to Leibniz scholars, producing a major philosophical work which is a joy to read. Discussions are rich with references to heretofore little known documents, correspondence, and revisions, and Adams uses these texts to full advantage. He argues for a Leibniz deeply engaged with his contemporaries, a Leibniz constantly (...)
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  31. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature. [REVIEW]Andrew K. Kelley - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):421-422.
    In this work, the author argues that Leibniz's philosophical project should be viewed as being guided by a "moral vision." Rutherford does not focus on one narrow problem in the Leibnizian corpus; rather he tries to show the unity of Leibniz's thought. In particular, he wants to show that the system of monads makes most sense when it is seen as the metaphysical structure that the world must have in order for it to be the best of all possible worlds.
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  32. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature.Nicholas Jolley - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:18-21.
    Leibniz is best known for maintaining two remarkable and seemingly implausible theses: the actual world is the best of all possible worlds, and reality ultimately consists of monads or soul-like entities. Scholars have subjected both these doctrines to searching examination, but on the whole they have not shown much interest in possible connections between them; Leibniz’s theodicy and his metaphysics have tended to be regarded as distinct projects which could be safely compartmentalized. In this deeply-researched, fluently-written and often penetrating study, (...)
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  33. added 2019-07-08
    Reply to Jolley’s Review of Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature.Donald Rutherford - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:22-26.
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature is intended to offer a broad panorama on Leibniz’s philosophy. Although necessarily selective in its focus, it aspires to a comprehensive understanding of how the different parts of Leibniz’s philosophy — theodicy, ethics, metaphysics, natural philosophy — fit together in a coherent and compelling fashion. In the book, I indicate some of the places where tensions threaten the unity of this scheme. My primary goal, however, is to reconstruct a system that would be (...)
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  34. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and Adam.Brandon Look - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:29-32.
    The book under review contains a selection of the papers presented at the conference “Leibniz and Adam,” held in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem from December 29, 1991 to January 2, 1992. The object of the conference and the book was to consider the role of Adam, the first man, in Leibniz’s thought and, in doing so, “to provide an unusual view of the interrelations between his metaphysics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of language, theory of knowledge, logic, attidude vis-à-vis mysticism, philosophy (...)
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  35. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature.Nicholas Jolley - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:18-21.
    Leibniz is best known for maintaining two remarkable and seemingly implausible theses: the actual world is the best of all possible worlds, and reality ultimately consists of monads or soul-like entities. Scholars have subjected both these doctrines to searching examination, but on the whole they have not shown much interest in possible connections between them; Leibniz’s theodicy and his metaphysics have tended to be regarded as distinct projects which could be safely compartmentalized. In this deeply-researched, fluently-written and often penetrating study, (...)
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  36. added 2019-07-08
    Reply to Jolley’s Review of Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature.Donald Rutherford - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:22-26.
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature is intended to offer a broad panorama on Leibniz’s philosophy. Although necessarily selective in its focus, it aspires to a comprehensive understanding of how the different parts of Leibniz’s philosophy — theodicy, ethics, metaphysics, natural philosophy — fit together in a coherent and compelling fashion. In the book, I indicate some of the places where tensions threaten the unity of this scheme. My primary goal, however, is to reconstruct a system that would be (...)
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  37. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and Adam. [REVIEW]Brandon Look - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:29-32.
    The book under review contains a selection of the papers presented at the conference “Leibniz and Adam,” held in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem from December 29, 1991 to January 2, 1992. The object of the conference and the book was to consider the role of Adam, the first man, in Leibniz’s thought and, in doing so, “to provide an unusual view of the interrelations between his metaphysics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of language, theory of knowledge, logic, attidude vis-à-vis mysticism, philosophy (...)
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  38. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature. [REVIEW]Nicholas Jolley - 1995 - The Leibniz Review 5:18-21.
    Leibniz is best known for maintaining two remarkable and seemingly implausible theses: the actual world is the best of all possible worlds, and reality ultimately consists of monads or soul-like entities. Scholars have subjected both these doctrines to searching examination, but on the whole they have not shown much interest in possible connections between them; Leibniz’s theodicy and his metaphysics have tended to be regarded as distinct projects which could be safely compartmentalized. In this deeply-researched, fluently-written and often penetrating study, (...)
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  39. added 2019-07-08
    De Summa Rerum. Metaphysical Papers, 1675-1676.Hubertus Busche - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):146-148.
    This welcome edition, the first volume of The Yale Leibniz, contains synoptically the original Latin text and an English translation of the very important philosophical papers written by Leibniz during his Paris period: on the one hand the series of the Elementa philosophiae arcanae de summa rerum from December 1675 to April 1676, and on the other hand a selection of the most important metaphysical texts and notes from March to December 1676. The printed text follows the Academy Edition, Series (...)
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  40. added 2019-07-08
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    In this paper I claim that there are three primary dimensions to the issue of freedom in Leibniz’s work. The first, and most widely discussed, is the logical dimension. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is concerned primarily about the relationship between freedom and modality: what does it mean for choice to be contingent? The second dimension is the theological one. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is interested in considering such issues as the relationships between divine knowledge or providence and human (...)
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  41. added 2019-07-08
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    In this paper I claim that there are three primary dimensions to the issue of freedom in Leibniz’s work. The first, and most widely discussed, is the logical dimension. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is concerned primarily about the relationship between freedom and modality: what does it mean for choice to be contingent? The second dimension is the theological one. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is interested in considering such issues as the relationships between divine knowledge or providence and human (...)
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  42. added 2019-07-08
    Possible Gods.Margaret D. Wilson - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (4):717-733.
    At least some of these commentators have then, rather naturally, taken a step which it will be the business of this essay to criticize. They have suggested that Leibniz’s "counter-part theory" can be understood as providing an interpretation of counter-factuals and certain forms of modal discourse within his system. For example, Mondadori writes.
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  43. added 2019-07-08
    Discourse on the Natural Theology of the Chinese. [REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):364-364.
    The fourth publication of the monograph series of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, this lengthy letter of Leibniz on Chinese philosophy is an important contribution to East-West philosophical dialogue, for it depicts a sympathetic yet critical assessment of Chinese philosophy on the basis of translations and secondary sources available to Leibniz. Leibniz’s interest, as the translators point out, was not merely ecumenical, but an expression of high regard for the intrinsic contributions of Chinese thought. In spite of mistakes (...)
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  44. added 2019-07-08
    Leibniz and the Modal Argument for God’s Existence.Loren E. Lomasky - 1970 - The Monist 54 (2):250-269.
    In this paper I shall concern myself with the ontological argument as found in Leibniz. In recent years several authors, notable among them Charles Hartshorne and Norman Malcolm, have contended that to speak of the ontological argument or the Anselmian argument is ambiguous, as in Anselm are to be found two logically independent ontological arguments. The more well-known version is from Proslogion II, and it takes existence as a perfection. This is the form of the argument rejected by Gaunilo, Aquinas, (...)
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    Theodicy. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):148-148.
    It is good to have Huggard's translation of the Theodicy back in print. This book can find excellent use in philosophy of religion courses which attempt to follow the history of the theodical and predestination problems. Since the Theodicy is not otherwise available, however, the fact that this edition is a fifty percent abridgment is very disappointing. Repetitions and digressions could have been bracketed rather than deleted, and the appendices ought to have been retained since some of Leibniz' most concise (...)
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  46. added 2019-07-08
    The God of Leibniz.William E. May - 1962 - New Scholasticism 36 (4):506-528.
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Paul Rateau , Lectures Et Interprétations des Essais de Théodicée de G. W. Leibniz. [REVIEW]Marine Picon - 2012 - The Leibniz Review 22:161-165.
  48. added 2019-06-06
    Liebniz's Examination of the Christian Religion.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1994 - Faith and Philosophy 11 (4):517-546.
  49. added 2019-06-06
    Natural Theology and the Concept of Perfection in Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz: MARK O. WEBB.Mark O. Webb - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (4):459-475.
    One of the hallmarks of the early modern rationalists was their confidence that a great deal of metaphysics could be done by purely a priori reasoning. They thought so at least partly because they inherited via Descartes Anselm's confidence that the existence of God could be established by purely a priori reasoning in an ontological argument. They also inherited a Thomistic and scholastic confidence that the concept of God as supremely perfect being, if subjected to serious and deep analysis, would (...)
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  50. added 2019-05-06
    La Tesis Leibniziana Del Mejor de Los Mundos Posibles: Significado y Consideraciones.Paul Rateau - 2017 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 43 (2):183-205.
    ¿Qué es lo que hace, según Leibniz, que se pueda decir que nuestro mundo es el mejor posible? Varias interpretaciones, no siempre posibles de conciliar, se han propuesto. Sería el mejor porque en ese mundo las criaturas razonables obtendrían la mayor felicidad, o por cuanto realizaría la mayor cantidad de ser y realidad a nivel total, o incluso porque sería el que asocia las leyes más simples con los fenómenos más ricos y variados. El objetivo de este artículo es mostrar (...)
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