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Summary Within the Anglophone philosophical world, Leibniz is recognized chiefly as a metaphysician, logician, and mathematician. However, he made wide-ranging contributions to the natural sciences of his day, participating in a number of discussions and controversies in fields as diverse as physics--in which he developed a science of force or "dynamics"--the sciences of life, medicine, optics, and geology. In scientific investigation, Leibniz relied on theoretical principles such as continuity, non-contradiction, and sufficient reason to constrain proposed hypotheses, and he maintained the compatibility of efficient and final causal explanation. As an inventor and a designer, he developed an early mechanical calculator, and, famously, failed in an attempt to harness wind-power to extract water from flooded mines in the Harz mountains. This theoretical and practical work was coupled by a life-long interest in furthering the growth of natural knowledge, including his project of a general science and encyclopedia aimed at organizing existing knowledge and aiding discovery. Leibniz also promoted the development of scientific societies, and was the founder and first president of what is now the Berlin-Brandenburgische Academy of Sciences and Humanities.  
Key works The following primary texts, listed chronologically and in English translation, have been selected to provide the reader with an overview of Leibniz's approach both to particular sciences including physics, cosmology, and geology, as well as to general topics of scientific discovery and methodology such as hypothesis, causal explanation, and the organization of knowledge in encyclopedic form. They also exhibit Leibniz's views regarding the utility of scientific knowledge for human life and highlight the interconnection of Leibniz's natural philosophy and metaphysics. Leibniz 1678-79? is an outline of an unrealized book on physics composed in the late 1670s, and is followed by a useful appendix on scientific methodology. In a text known as the Project of a New Encyclopedia to be Written Following the Method of Invention (Leibniz 1679), we find one of Leibniz's many sketches for an Encyclopedia that would organize, catolog, and promote the growth of knowledge. In the Brief Demonstration (Leibniz 1686), Leibniz provides an important critique of Cartesian physics focusing on the correct formulation of conservation laws. The Protogaea (Leibniz et al 2008) is Leibniz's speculative geological treatise on the origins of the Earth that was intended (in Leibniz's typically ambitious, incisive, yet diffuse intellectual manner) to serve as the opening of his never completed history of the House of Hannover. The Specimen Dynacum (Leibniz 1989) presents Leibniz's new science of force, or dynamics. In the Tentamen Anagogicum (Leibniz 1696), Leibniz defends the use of final causes in physics and features an early version of the principle of least action. Leibniz argues in De Ipsa Natura (Leibniz 1698) that a coherent philosophy of nature requires the postulation of an inherent force within natural substances. The New Essays on Human Understanding (Leibniz 1981) represents Leibniz's point by point critique of Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and covers a number of topics related to the philosophy of science. The Leibniz-Clarke correspondence (Leibniz et al 2000) is Leibniz's well-known debate with the Newtonian Samuel Clarke, highlighting the differences between the Leibnizian and Newtonian accounts of nature.
Introductions For a general overview of Leibniz's scientific methodology, see Duchesneau 1993. Smith 2011 focuses on Leibniz's involvement with the life sciences of his day, and reveals the tight connection between Leibniz's metaphysics and his attempts to explain living, organic bodies..
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  1. Kant's Critique Of Leibnizian Theory Of Organisms: An Unnoticed Cornerstone For Criticism?Philippe Huneman - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 4.
  2. A LEIBNIZIAN, PLURALIST CONCEPTION OF BOTH BIOLOGICAL LIFE AND THEOLOGY. AntoninoDrago - forthcoming - In Proceedings of conference in Rome Tor Vergata sept. 2015 (in Italian).
  3. The Space Between and the Space Within: On the Definition, Conception, and Function of Space in Leibniz's Late Metaphysics.Julia Bursten - forthcoming - Think.
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  4. Force, Motion, and Leibniz’s Argument From Successiveness.Peter Myrdal - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This essay proposes a new interpretation of a central, and yet overlooked, argument Leibniz offers against Descartes’s power-free ontology of the corporeal world. Appealing to considerations about the successiveness of motion, Leibniz attempts to show that the reality of motion requires force. It is often assumed that the argument is driven by concerns inspired by Zeno. Against such a reading, this essay contends that Leibniz’s argument is instead best understood against the background of an Aristotelian view of the priority of (...)
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  5. G.W. Leibniz: Sign and the Problem of Expression.Dimitri A. Bayuk & Olga B. Fedorova - 2020 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 57 (1):146-165.
    The disciplinary differentiation of sciences attracted Leibniz’s attention for a long period of time. From nowadays prospects it looks very well grounded as soon as in Leibniz’s manuscripts a modern scholar finds clue ideas of any research field which would tempt him to consider Leibniz as one of the founders of this particular discipline. We argue that this is possible only in retrospection and would significantly distort the essence of Leibniz’s epistemology. Our approach implies, in contrary, the investigation of the (...)
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  6. Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by Richard Arthur. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2020 - Mind 129 (514):664-673.
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by ArthurRichard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. ix + 329.
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  7. Newton and Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2020 - Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    It is easy to get the impression that Newton and Leibniz do not see eye to eye on anything. Yet, as is so often the case, a closer look reveals that matters are much more complicated. Despite their disagreements, the two are frequently on the same side of central scientific and philosophical debates. This entry discusses some of the main agreements and disagreements between Newton and Leibniz, starting with their methodologies and then turning to their views on space, motion, and (...)
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  8. Continuity, Containment, and Coincidence: Leibniz in the History of the Exact Sciences: Vincenzo De Risi (Ed.): Leibniz and the Structure of Sciences: Modern Perspectives on the History of Logic, Mathematics, and Epistemology. Dordrecht: Springer, 2019, 298pp, 103.99€ HB.Christopher P. Noble - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):523-526.
  9. Between Laws and Norms. Genesis of the Concept of Organism in Leibniz and in the Early Modern Western Philosophy.Antonio M. Nunziante - 2020 - In Andrea Altobrando & Pierfrancesco Biasetti (eds.), Natural Born Monads: On the Metaphysics of Organisms and Human Individuals. De Gruyter. pp. 11-32.
    The word “organism” represents an original keyword of the early-modern philosophical world. As it was first developed by Leibniz, it seems to blend together two different conceptual paradigms: the Cartesian model of the “machines” and the Aristotelian legacy of the “individual natures”. According to the first, nature represents itself the prototype of any good mechanical functioning, but at the same time its inner development is explained by the occurrence of a normative dimension that rules the world of primitive forces in (...)
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  10. Universal Gravitation and the (Un)Intelligibility of Natural Philosophy.Matias Slavov - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (1):129-157.
    This article centers on Hume’s position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. To that end, the controversy surrounding universal gravitation shall be scrutinized. It is very well-known that Hume sides with the Newtonian experimentalist approach rather than with the Leibnizian demand for intelligibility. However, what is not clear is Hume’s overall position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. It shall be argued that Hume declines Leibniz’s principle of intelligibility. However, Hume does not eschew intelligibility altogether; his concept of causation itself (...)
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  11. Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter - 2020 - In Dana Jalobeanu & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) profoundly shaped early eighteenth-century European philosophy with an a priori demonstration of the existence of God and influential defenses of substance dualism and human freedom. Throughout his works, he defended absolute space, the passivity of matter, and constant divine activity in the world, which jointly provided a metaphysical basis for the quickly popularizing Newtonian thought.
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  12. Cause and Effect in Leibniz’s Brevis Demonstratio.Laurynas Adomaitis - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (1):120-134.
    Leibniz’s argument against Descartes’s conservation principle in the Brevis demonstratio (1686) has traditionally been read as passing from the premise that motive force must be conserved to the conclusion that motive force is not identical to quantity of motion and, finally, that quantity of motion is not conserved. In a lesser-known draft of the same year, Christiaan Huygens claimed that Descartes had in fact never held the view that Leibniz was attacking. Huygens is right as far as the traditional reading (...)
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  13. Equivalence of Hypotheses and Galilean Censure in Leibniz: A Conspiracy or a Way to Moderate Censure?Laurynas Adomaitis - 2019 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 72 (1):63-85.
    Spending six months in Rome in 1689 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) occupied himself with the question of Copernican and Galilean censure. An established reading of the Rome papers suggests that Leibniz’s attempt to have the Copernican censure lifted was derived solely from the equivalence of hypotheses stemming from the relativity of motion; and involved Leibniz’s compromising his belief in the truth of the Copernican hypothesis by arguing that it should only be interpreted instrumentally; and that Leibniz believed in the unrestricted (...)
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  14. Organisme et corps organique de Leibniz à Kant, by F. Duchesneau.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:107-119.
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  15. Leibniz and the Structure of Sciences: Modern Perspectives on the History of Logic, Mathematics, Epistemology.Vincenzo De Risi (ed.) - 2019 - Springer.
  16. A Reply to M. F. Camposampiero.François Duchesneau - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:121-128.
  17. Machines of Nature and Machines of Art: Christian Wolff's Reception of Leibniz.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2019 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 3:431-452.
  18. Teleology and Realism in Leibniz's Philosophy of Science.Nabeel Hamid - 2019 - In Vincenzo De Risi (ed.), Leibniz and the Structure of Sciences. Berlin: Springer. pp. 271-298.
    This paper argues for an interpretation of Leibniz’s claim that physics requires both mechanical and teleological principles as a view regarding the interpretation of physical theories. Granting that Leibniz’s fundamental ontology remains non-physical, or mentalistic, it argues that teleological principles nevertheless ground a realist commitment about mechanical descriptions of phenomena. The empirical results of the new sciences, according to Leibniz, have genuine truth conditions: there is a fact of the matter about the regularities observed in experience. Taking this stance, however, (...)
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  19. Leibniz on the Divine Preformation of Souls and Bodies.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):327-342.
  20. Locke and Leibniz on Matter and Solidity.Idan Shimony - 2019 - In Adriano Fabris & Giovanni Scarafile (eds.), Controversies in the Contemporary World. Amsterdam/ Philadelphia: pp. 49-67.
    In this paper I analyze the virtual debate between Locke and Leibniz on solidity as proposed in Leibniz’s chapter on solidity in his New Essays on Human Understanding. I first track the oddities of the dialogue presented in the New Essays’ chapter on solidity. In this virtual dialogue, Leibniz’s representative often digresses and sometimes overlooks or misrepresents some of Locke’s most important insights. I then argue that these oddities reflect Leibniz’s sentiment that a productive controversy on this issue cannot be (...)
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  21. Leibnizian Conservation in D’Alembert’s Traité de Dynamique.Tzuchien Tho - 2019 - In Lloyd Strickland & Julia Weckend (eds.), Leibniz’s Legacy and Impact. New York and Oxford: Routledge. pp. 129-164.
  22. The Immanent Contingency of Physical Laws in Leibniz’s Dynamics.Tzuchien Tho - 2019 - In Rodolfo Garau & Pietro Omodeo (eds.), Contingency and Natural Order in Early Modern Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 289-316.
    This paper focuses on Leibniz’s conception of modality and its application to the issue of natural laws. The core of Leibniz’s investigation of the modality of natural laws lays in the distinction between necessary, geometrical laws on the one hand, and contingent, physical laws of nature on the other. For Leibniz, the contingency of physical laws entailed the assumption of the existence of an additional form of causality beyond mechanical or efficient ones. While geometrical truths, being necessary, do not require (...)
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  23. Leibniz's Legacy and Impact.Julia Weckend & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume tells the story of the legacy and impact of the great German polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Leibniz made significant contributions to many areas, including philosophy, mathematics, political and social theory, theology, and various sciences. The essays in this volume explores the effects of Leibniz’s profound insights on subsequent generations of thinkers by tracing the ways in which his ideas have been defended and developed in the three centuries since his death. Each of the 11 essays is concerned (...)
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  24. How to Connect Physics with Metaphysics: Leibniz on the Conservation Law, Force, and Substance.Shohei Edamura - 2018 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 74 (2-3):787-810.
    Leibniz once argued that scholastic substantial forms do not exist, but he later emphasized that bodies have substantial forms. This implies that he assumed that bodies have intrinsic powers to act by themselves. In order to understand the change of his metaphysics, we need to identify the resources of his motivation to introduce a new view. On the basis of Leibniz’s early works in the 1670s and 80s, this paper explores how his discovery of the law that the quantity of (...)
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  25. Space and Time as Relations: The Theoretical Approach of Leibniz.Basil Evangelidis - 2018 - Philosophies 3 (2):9-0.
    The epistemological rupture of Copernicus, the laws of planetary motions of Kepler, the comprehensive physical observations of Galileo and Huygens, the conception of relativity, and the physical theory of Newton were components of an extremely fertile and influential cognitive environment that prompted the restless Leibniz to shape an innovative theory of space and time. This theory expressed some of the concerns and intuitions of the scientific community of the seventeenth century, in particular the scientific group of the Academy of Sciences (...)
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  26. Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence, Brain in a Vat, Five-Minute Hypothesis, McTaggart’s Paradox, Etc. Are Clarified in Quantum Language [Revised Version].Shiro Ishikawa - 2018 - Open Journal of Philosophy 8 (5):466-480.
    Recently we proposed "quantum language" (or, the linguistic Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics"), which was not only characterized as the metaphysical and linguistic turn of quantum mechanics but also the linguistic turn of Descartes=Kant epistemology. We believe that quantum language is the language to describe science, which is the final goal of dualistic idealism. Hence there is a reason to want to clarify, from the quantum linguistic point of view, the following problems: "brain in a vat argument", "the Cogito proposition", (...)
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  27. Theoretical Construction in Physics – The Role of Leibniz for Weyl's ‘Philosophie der Mathematik Und Naturwissenschaft’.Norman Sieroka - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 61:6-17.
  28. Substantivalism and Relationism as Bad Cartography: Why Spatial Ontology Needs a Better Map.Edward Slowik - 2018 - In S. Wuppuluri & F. A. Doria (eds.), The Map and the Territory: Exploring the Foundations of Science, Thought and Reality. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 185-198.
    While there are numerous difficulties with the standard spacetime ontological dichotomy, namely, substantivalism versus relationism, this investigation will focus on two specific issues as a means of examining and developing alternative ontological conceptions of space that go beyond the limitations imposed by the standard dichotomy. First, while Newton and Leibniz are often upheld as the progenitors of, respectively, substantivalism and relationism, their own work in the natural philosophy of space often contradicts the central tenets of that dichotomy. Second, while the (...)
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  29. Potentia, Actio, Vis: The Quantity Mv2 and its Causal Role.Tzuchien Tho - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (4):411-443.
    This article aims to interpret Leibniz’s dynamics project through a theory of the causation of corporeal motion. It presents an interpretation of the dynamics that characterizes physical causation as the structural organization of phenomena. The measure of living force by mv2 must then be understood as an organizational property of motion conceptually distinct from the geometrical or otherwise quantitative magnitudes exchanged in mechanical phenomena. To defend this view, we examine one of the most important theoretical discrepancies of Leibniz’s dynamics with (...)
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  30. Leibniz, the Microscope and the Concept of Preformation.Alessandro Becchi - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (1):4.
    In recent years a certain emphasis has been put by some scholars on Leibniz’s concern about empirical sciences and the relations between such concern and the development of his mature metaphysical system. In this paper I focus on Leibniz’s interest for the microscope and the astonishing discoveries that such instrument made possible in the field of the life sciences during the last part of the Seventeenth century. The observation of physical bodies carried out by the “magnifying glasses” revealed a matter (...)
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  31. The Wedge and the Vis Viva Controversy: How Concepts of Force Influenced the Practice of Early Eighteenth-Century Mechanics.Jip Besouw - 2017 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 71 (2):109-156.
    This article discusses the quest for the mechanical advantage of the wedge in the eighteenth century. As a case study, the wedge enlightens our understanding of eighteenth-century mechanics in general and the controversy over “force” or vis viva in particular. In this article, I show that the two different approaches to mechanics, the one that favoured force in terms of velocities and the one that primarily used displacements—known as the ‘Newtonian’ and ‘Leibnizian’ methods, respectively—were not at all on par in (...)
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  32. Does Leibniz Have Any Place in a History of Racism?John Harfouch - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):737-755.
    I claim that a genealogy of the philological racism known as ‘orientalism’ should include Leibniz as a founding figure. This argument is framed and motivated by recent publications that seek to exclude Leibniz from the history of race and racism by arguing that he insists on a linguistic, rather than ‘racial,’ schematic of human diversity. A survey of nineteenth-century race theory reveals that this distinction is not only specious, but these recent defenses only further implicate Leibniz in the linguistic tradition (...)
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  33. Leibniz’s Scientific Collaboration with Adam Kochański, S.J.Bogdan Lisiak - 2017 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 65 (2):205-222.
    The exchange of thoughts between Adam Kochański and Leibniz presented in this paper points to a very large spectrum of scientific interests shared by both scientists. The scope of their research included, above all, mathematics, philosophy, linguistics, the construction of a calculating device, a perpetuum mobile, other mechanics, and alchemy. Both men became close to each other through their passion for mathematics in which they searched for a universal method of scientific investigation, a method that would be of use not (...)
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  34. On Analogies in Leibniz’s Philosophy: Scientific Discovery and the Case of the Spiritual Automaton.Christopher P. Noble - 2017 - Quaestiones Disputatae 7 (2):8-30.
    This paper analyzes Leibniz’s use of analogies in both natural philosophical and metaphysical contexts. Through an examination of Leibniz’s notes on scientific methodology, I show that Leibniz explicitly recognizes the utility of analogies as heuristic tools that aid us in conceiving unfamiliar theoretical domains. I further argue that Leibniz uses the notion of a self-moving machine or automaton to help capture the activities of the immaterial soul. My account helps resist the conventional image of Leibniz as an arch-rationalist unconcerned with (...)
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  35. Review of Vis Vim Vi: Declinations of Force in Leibniz’s Dynamics, by Tzuchien Tho. [REVIEW]Edward Slowik - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:169-172.
  36. Newton's Concepts of Force Among the Leibnizians.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Mordechai Feingold & Elizabethanne Boran (eds.), Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe. Leiden: Brill. pp. 244-289.
    I argue that the key dynamical concepts and laws of Newton's Principia never gained a solid foothold in Germany before Kant in the 1750s. I explain this absence as due to Leibniz. Thus I make a case for a robust Leibnizian legacy for Enlightenment science, and I solve what Jonathan Israel called “a meaningful historical problem on its own,” viz. the slow and hesitant reception of Newton in pre-Kantian Germany.
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  37. Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz.L. Strickland, E. Vynckier & J. Weckend - 2017 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book presents new research into key areas of the work of German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Reflecting various aspects of Leibniz's thought, this book offers a collection of original research arranged into four separate themes: Science, Metaphysics, Epistemology, and Religion and Theology. With in-depth articles by experts such as Maria Rosa Antognazza, Nicholas Jolley, Agustín Echavarría, Richard Arthur and Paul Lodge, this book is an invaluable resource not only for readers just beginning to discover Leibniz, but (...)
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  38. Vis Vim Vi: Declinations of Force in Leibniz’s Dynamics.Tzuchien Tho - 2017 - Basel: Springer International Publishing.
    This book presents a systematic reconstruction of Leibniz’s dynamics project (c. 1676-1700) that contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the concepts of physical causality in Leibniz’s work and 17th century physics. It argues that Leibniz’s theory of forces privileges the causal relationship between structural organization and physical phenomena instead of body-to-body mechanical causation. The mature conception of Leibnizian force is not the power of one body to cause motion in another, but a kind of structural causation related to the (...)
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  39. Philosophy and Science in Leibniz.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2016 - In L. Strickland, E. Vynckier & J. Weckend (eds.), Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 19-46.
    This paper explores the question of Leibniz’s contribution to the rise of modern ‘science’. To be sure, it is now generally agreed that the modern category of ‘science’ did not exist in the early modern period. At the same time, this period witnessed a very important stage in the process from which modern science eventually emerged. My discussion will be aimed at uncovering the new enterprise, and the new distinctions which were taking shape in the early modern period under the (...)
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  40. Rationality at Stake: Leibniz and the Beginnings of Newton’s Era.Michał Heller - 2016 - Philosophical Problems in Science 61:5-22.
    Our present knowledge in the field of dynamical systems, information theory, probability theory and other similar domains indicates that the human brain is a complex dynamical system working in a strong chaotic regime in which random processes play important roles. In this environment our mental life develops. To choose a logically ordered sequence from a random or almost random stream of thoughts is a difficult and energy consuming task. The only domain in which we are able to do this with (...)
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  41. Wyzwanie dla racjonalności: Leibniz i początek ery Newtona.Michał Heller - 2016 - Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 61:5-22.
    Our present knowledge in the field of dynamical systems, information theory, probability theory and other similar domains indicates that the human brain is a complex dynamical system working in a strong chaotic regime in which random processes play important roles. In this environment our mental life develops. To choose a logically ordered sequence from a random or almost random stream of thoughts is a difficult and energy consuming task. The only domain in which we are able to do this with (...)
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  42. Leibniz and the Foundations of Physics: The Later Years.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (1):1-34.
    This essay offers an account of the relationship between extended Leibnizian bodies and unextended Leibnizian monads, an account that shows why Leibniz was right to see intimate, explanatory connections between his studies in physics and his mature metaphysics. The first section sets the stage by introducing a case study from Leibniz's technical work on the strength of extended, rigid beams. The second section draws on that case study to introduce a model for understanding Leibniz's views on the relationship between derivative (...)
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  43. A Historical Defence of Non-Spacetime Hypotheses: Non-Local Beables and Leibnizian Ubeity.Edward Slowik - 2016 - Philosophia Scientiae 20:149-166.
    Do theories of quantum mechanics and quantum gravity require spacetime to be a basic, ground level feature, or can spacetime be seen as an emergent element of these theories? While several commentators have raised serious doubts about the prospects of forgoing the standard spacetime backdrop, it will be argued that a defense of these emergent spacetime interpretations of quantum mechanics and quantum gravity hypotheses can be made, whether as an inference to the best explanation or using another strategy. Furthermore, the (...)
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  44. Situating Kant’s Pre-Critical Monadology: Leibnizian Ubeity, Monadic Activity, and Idealist Unity.Edward Slowik - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (4):332-349.
    This essay examines the relationship between monads and space in Kant’s early pre-critical work, with special attention devoted to the question of ubeity, a Scholastic doctrine that Leibniz describes as “ways of being somewhere”. By focusing attention on this concept, evidence will be put forward that supports the claim, held by various scholars, that the monad-space relationship in Kant is closer to Leibniz’ original conception than the hypotheses typically offered by the later Leibniz-Wolff school. In addition, Kant’s monadology, in conjunction (...)
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  45. A Historical Defence of Non-Spacetime Hypotheses: Non-Local Beables and Leibnizian Ubeity.Edward Slowik - 2016 - Philosophia Scientae 20:149-166.
    Les théories de la mécanique quantique et de la gravité quantique exigent-elles que l’espace-temps soit un trait fondamental de bas niveau, ou l’espace-temps peut-il être conçu comme un élément émergent de ces théories? Tandis que plusieurs commentateurs ont émis de sérieux doutes sur l’idée de se dispenser de l’arrière-plan d’un espace-temps standard, nous ferons valoir qu’une défense de ces interprétations de l’espace-temps émergeant des hypothèses de la mécanique et de la gravité quantiques peut être conduite soit par inférence à la (...)
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  46. Leibnizian Relationalism for General Relativistic Physics.Antonio Vassallo & Michael Esfeld - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics:101-107.
    An ontology of Leibnizian relationalism, consisting in distance relations among sparse matter points and their change only, is well recognized as a serious option in the context of classical mechanics. In this paper, we investigate how this ontology fares when it comes to general relativistic physics. Using a Humean strategy, we regard the gravitational field as a means to represent the overall change in the distance relations among point particles in a way that achieves the best combination of being simple (...)
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  47. Substantivalism Vs Relationalism About Space in Classical Physics.Shamik Dasgupta - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (9):601-624.
    Substantivalism is the view that space exists in addition to any material bodies situated within it. Relationalism is the opposing view that there is no such thing as space; there are just material bodies, spatially related to one another. This paper assesses this issue in the context of classical physics. It starts by describing the bucket argument for substantivalism. It then turns to anti-substantivalist arguments, including Leibniz's classic arguments and their contemporary reincarnation under the guise of ‘symmetry’. It argues that (...)
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  48. Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life.Boris Demarest - 2015 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 4 (1):128-132.
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  49. Leibniz on the Principle of Equipollence and Spinoza’s Causal Axiom.Mogens Lærke - 2015 - The Leibniz Review 25:123-130.
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  50. Leibniz's Principle of Continuity and the Concept of Homology in Biology.Alexandr Pozdnyakov - 2015 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 46 (4):193-212.
    This article discusses the problem of the influence of the Leibniz' continuity principle on the concept of structural plan and homology formation in biology. The concept of body plan was established for the justification of the thesis about the structural sameness of the all living objects at the organismal level. However, the continuity hypothes is testing which was made on the comparative anatomical material has showed the impossibility of reducing the animals structure explanation to the single plan. The idea of (...)
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