Life Support

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
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110 found
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1 — 50 / 110
  1. added 2020-03-10
    Withdrawal of Nutrition and Hydration, and Withdrawal of Ventilation - What Does Tradition Say?Michal Pruski - 2020 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 70 (1):16-19.
    With recent guidance from the BMA and RCP on the withdrawal of nutrition from patients, and how the cause of death is being recorded (1), and the case of Vincent Lambert (2), the debate surrounding withdrawal of care and treatment has been rekindled in Catholic circles. In this article, I wish to highlight some of traditional principles that form the basis of such decision-making. I discuss these within the context of the withdrawal of nutrition and hydration (NaH), as well as (...)
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  2. added 2019-10-31
    Are the Irreversibly Comatose Still Here? The Destruction of Brains and the Persistence of Persons.Lukas J. Meier - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (2):99-103.
    When an individual is comatose while parts of her brain remain functional, the question arises as to whether any mental characteristics are still associated with this brain, that is, whether the person still exists. Settling this uncertainty requires that one becomes clear about two issues: the type of functional loss that is associated with the respective profile of brain damage and the persistence conditions of persons. Medical case studies can answer the former question, but they are not concerned with the (...)
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  3. added 2019-10-26
    Reasonable Parental and Medical Obligations in Pediatric Extraordinary Therapy.Michal Pruski & Nathan K. Gamble - 2019 - The Linacre Quarterly 86 (2-3):198-206.
    The English cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans involved a conflict between the desires of their parents to preserve their children’s lives and judgments of their medical teams in pursuit of clinically appropriate therapy. The treatment the children required was clearly extraordinary, including a wide array of advanced life-sustaining technological support. The cases exemplify a clash of worldviews rooted in different philosophies of life and medical care. The article highlights the differing perspectives on parental authority in medical care in (...)
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  4. added 2019-10-21
    Should Aggregate Patient Preference Data Be Used to Make Decisions on Behalf of Unrepresented Patients?Nathaniel Sharadin - 2019 - AMA Journal of Ethics 21 (7):566-574.
    Patient preference predictors aim to solve the moral problem of making treatment decisions on behalf of incapacitated patients. This commentary on a case of an unrepresented patient at the end of life considers 3 related problems of such predictors: the problem of restricting the scope of inputs to the models (the “scope” problem), the problem of weighing inputs against one another (the “weight” problem), and the problem of multiple reasonable solutions to the scope and weight problems (the “multiple reasonable models” (...)
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  5. added 2019-09-09
    What It Is To Die.Cody Gilmore - forthcoming - In Michael Cholbi & Travis Timmerman (eds.), Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying. New York: Routledge.
    A defense of the view that (i) to be alive is to be actively undergoing (not merely capable of undergoing) certain vital processes, that (ii) to die is cease to be capable of undergoing those processes (not to cease undergoing them), and that (iii) organisms in cryptobiosis (suspended animation) are not undergoing those processes but are capable of doing so, and are neither alive nor dead.
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  6. added 2019-06-20
    Review of Daniel Callahan, The Troubled Dream of Life. [REVIEW]Donna Dickenson - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21:188-191.
    Review of Daniel Callahan's book The Troubled Dream of Life.
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  7. added 2019-06-19
    Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.Donna Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effect. A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on "Death and Dying" was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on "Decisions near the End of Life". Practitioners accept the relevance of concepts widely disparaged (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-18
    Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.D. L. Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    Objectives—To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effectDesign, subjects and setting–A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on “Death and Dying” was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on “Decisions near the End of Life”.Results–Practitioners accept the relevance of concepts widely (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-14
    If Food and Water Are Proportionate Means, Why Not Oxygen?John Skalko - 2013 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (3):453-468.
    Providing food and water, even by tube, is in principle an ordinary and proportionate means of preserving life. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made that clear in its August 1, 2007 statement on the matter. However, a pressing question remains: What about oxygen? Food and water are necessary for life. Is not oxygen equally necessary? So why did the CDF not also declare the use of a mechanical ventilator to be in principle an ordinary and proportionate means (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Response: A Defence of a New Perspective on Euthanasia.David Shaw - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):123-125.
    In two recent papers, Hugh McLachlan, Jacob Busch and Raffaele Rodogno have criticised my new perspective on euthanasia. Each paper analyses my argument and suggests two flaws. McLachlan identifies what he sees as important points regarding the justification of legal distinctions in the absence of corresponding moral differences and the professional role of the doctor. Busch and Rodogno target my criterion of brain life, arguing that it is a necessary but not sufficient condition and that it is not generalisable. In (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Paper: The Right to Die in the Minimally Conscious State.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):175-178.
    The right to die has for decades been recognised for persons in a vegetative state, but there remains controversy about ending life-sustaining medical treatment for persons in the minimally conscious state. The controversy is rooted in assumptions about the moral significance of consciousness, and the value of life for patients who are conscious and not terminally ill. This paper evaluates these assumptions in light of evidence that generates concerns about quality of life in the MCS. It is argued that surrogates (...)
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  12. added 2019-06-05
    Termination of Prehospital Resuscitative Efforts: A Study of Documentation on Ethical Considerations at the Scene.Søren Mikkelsen, Caroline Schaffalitzky, Lars Grassmé Binderup, Hans Morten Lossius, Palle Toft & Annmarie Touborg Lassen - 2017 - Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine 35 (25).
    Background Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical records (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-05
    At Law: Schiavo: A Hard Case Makes Questionable Law.Rebecca Dresser - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):8.
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  14. added 2019-04-11
    Epistemic Burdens and the Incentives of Surrogate Decision-Makers.Parker Crutchfield & Scott Scheall - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):613-621.
    We aim to establish the following claim: other factors held constant, the relative weights of the epistemic burdens of competing treatment options serve to determine the options that patient surrogates pursue. Simply put, surrogates confront an incentive, ceteris paribus, to pursue treatment options with respect to which their knowledge is most adequate to the requirements of the case. Regardless of what the patient would choose, options that require more knowledge than the surrogate possesses (or is likely to learn) will either (...)
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  15. added 2019-04-09
    Withdrawal Aversion as a Useful Heuristic for Critical Care Decisions.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):36-38.
    While agreeing with the main conclusion of Dominic Wilkinson and colleagues (Wilkinson, Butcherine, and Savulescu 2019), namely, that there is no moral difference between treatment withholding and withdrawal as such, we wish to criticize their approach on the basis that it treats the widespread acceptance of withdrawal aversion (WA) as a cognitive bias. Wilkinson and colleagues understand WA as “a nonrational preference for withholding (WH) treatment over withdrawal (WD) of treatment” (22). They treat WA as a manifestation of loss aversion (...)
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  16. added 2019-01-11
    In Defense of Brain Death: Replies to Don Marquis, Michael Nair-Collins, Doyen Nguyen, and Laura Specker Sullivan.John P. Lizza - 2018 - Diametros 55:68-90.
    In this paper, I defend brain death as a criterion for determining death against objections raised by Don Marquis, Michael Nair-Collins, Doyen Nguyen, and Laura Specker Sullivan. I argue that any definition of death for beings like us relies on some sortal concept by which we are individuated and identified and that the choice of that concept in a practical context is not determined by strictly biological considerations but involves metaphysical, moral, social, and cultural considerations. This view supports acceptance of (...)
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  17. added 2019-01-09
    Śmierć mózgowa – zmiana w rozumieniu człowieka?Jacek Meller - 2018 - Diametros 56:151-156.
    Review of the book: Człowiek na granicy istnienia. Dyskusje o śmierci mózgowej i innych aspektach umierania, Grzegorz Hołub, Piotr Duchliński, Akademia Ignatianum w Krakowie, Wydawnictwo WAM, Kraków 2017.
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  18. added 2018-12-21
    Solidarity in Healthcare – the Challenge of Dementia.Aleksandra Małgorzata Głos - 2016 - Diametros 49:1-26.
    Dementia will soon be ranked as the world’s largest economy. At present, it ranges from the 16th to 18th place, with countries such as Indonesia, the Netherlands, and Turkey. Dementia is not only a financial challenge, but also a philosophical one. It provokes a paradigm shift in the traditional view of healthcare and expands the classic concepts of human personhood and autonomy. A promising response to these challenges is the idea of cooperative solidarity. Cooperative solidarity, contrary to its ‘humanitarian’ version, (...)
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  19. added 2018-12-21
    Polemical Note: Can It Be Unethical to Provide Nutrition and Hydration to Patients with Advanced Dementia?Rachel Haliburton - 2016 - Diametros 50:152-160.
    Patients suffering from advanced dementia present ethicists and caregivers with a difficult issue: we do not know how they feel or how they want to be treated, and they have no way of telling us. We do not know, therefore, whether we ought to prolong their lives by providing them with nutrition and hydration, or whether we should not provide them with food and water and let them die. Since providing food and water to patients is considered to be basic (...)
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  20. added 2018-01-15
    Two Ways to Kill a Patient.Ben Bronner - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):44-63.
    According to the Standard View, a doctor who withdraws life-sustaining treatment does not kill the patient but rather allows the patient to die—an important distinction, according to some. I argue that killing can be understood in either of two ways, and given the relevant understanding, the Standard View is insulated from typical criticisms. I conclude by noting several problems for the Standard View that remain to be fully addressed.
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  21. added 2017-09-04
    Advance Directives and the Descendant Argument.Jukka Varelius - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (1):1-11.
    By issuing an advance treatment directive, an autonomous person can formally express what kinds of treatment she wishes and does not wish to receive in case she becomes ill or injured and unable to autonomously decide about her treatment. While many jurisdictions and medical associations endorse them, advance treatment directives have also been criticized. According to an important criticism, when a person irreversibly loses her autonomy what she formerly autonomously desired ceases to be of importance in deciding about her treatment. (...)
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  22. added 2017-07-17
    You Should Not Have Let Your Baby Die.Gary Comstock - 2017 July 12 - New York Times.
    Sam, your newborn son, has been suffocating in your arms for the past 15 minutes. You’re as certain as you can be that he is going to die in the next 15.
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  23. added 2017-02-14
    Late Lessons From Auschwitz–is There Anything More to Learn for the 21st Century?J. Norelle Lickiss - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):137-137.
    SIRA conference of philosophy of medicine in Crakow, August 2000, offered the opportunity to visit Auschwitz—an offer reluctantly accepted by the author who had two decades ago, spent some months in Israel, cried at Dachau, treated many holocaust survivors, and counts among close friends and colleagues persons profoundly affected by Auschwitz and associated activities. Surely, the visit would be simply a mark of respect, and an episode of further personal grieving maybe, but not enlightenment. This was not the case.The lasting (...)
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  24. added 2017-02-13
    Reasons Behind Providing Futile Medical Treatments in Iran.Maryam Aghabarary & Nahid Dehghan Nayeri - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):33-45.
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  25. added 2017-02-13
    A Feminist Utilitarian Perspective on Euthanasia: From Nancy Crick to Terri Schiavo.Gail Tulloch - 2005 - Nursing Inquiry 12 (2):155-160.
  26. added 2017-02-08
    Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death.J. P. Bishop - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. (Foucault, 1984, 85)In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern government, the state became exceedingly (...)
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  27. added 2017-02-07
    The Terri Schiavo Case : Biopolitics, Biopower, and Privacy as Singularity.John Protevi - 2009 - In Rosi Braidotti, Claire Colebrook & Patrick Hanafin (eds.), Deleuze and Law: Forensic Futures. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  28. added 2017-02-07
    The Challenge of Terri Schiavo: Lessons for Bioethics.T. Koch - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):376-378.
    This essay reviews a range of issues arising from the complex case of Terri Schiavo and the lessons the case raises for bioethicists. It argues that embedded in the case is a broader controversy than is immediately evident, one involving the definitions by which bioethics judge cases of extreme physical and psychological limits, in its principled form of address. Further, it argues that bioethicists who assume the issues involved in the case are settled miss the point of the emotional responses (...)
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  29. added 2017-02-07
    Late Lessons From Auschwitz-is There Anything More to Learn for the 21st Century?P. J. N. Lickiss - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):137-137.
    SIRA conference of philosophy of medicine in Crakow, August 2000, offered the opportunity to visit Auschwitz—an offer reluctantly accepted by the author who had two decades ago, spent some months in Israel, cried at Dachau, treated many holocaust survivors, and counts among close friends and colleagues persons profoundly affected by Auschwitz and associated activities. Surely, the visit would be simply a mark of respect, and an episode of further personal grieving maybe, but not enlightenment. This was not the case.The lasting (...)
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  30. added 2017-01-28
    The Legacy of Terri Schiavo for the Nonreligious.Nat Hentoff - 2005 - Free Inquiry 25.
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  31. added 2017-01-27
    The Total Artificial Heart and the Dilemma of Deactivation.Ben Bronner - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (4):347-367.
    It is widely believed to be permissible for a physician to discontinue any treatment upon the request of a competent patient. Many also believe it is never permissible for a physician to intentionally kill a patient. I argue that the prospect of deactivating a patient’s artificial heart presents us with a dilemma: either the first belief just mentioned is false or the second one is. Whichever horn of the dilemma we choose has significant implications for contemporary medical ethics.
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  32. added 2017-01-26
    Science, Ethics, and Politics: The Case of Avastin.Franklin G. Miller & Steven Joffe - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5):5-5.
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  33. added 2017-01-26
    The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo.J. Finnis & Nd Schiff - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4).
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  34. added 2017-01-26
    Terri Schiavo and the Catholic Connection.Rita L. Marker - 2004 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 4 (3):555-569.
  35. added 2017-01-26
    Saying Goodbye: The Terri Schiavo Case.M. Christopher - 2002 - Bioethics Forum 19 (1-2):37-40.
  36. added 2017-01-25
    On 25 February 1990, Terri Schiavo, 26 Years of Age, Collapsed in the Hall of Her Apartment and Experienced Severe Hypoxia for Several Minutes. She Had Not Executed a Living Will or a Durable Power of Attorney. Four Months After Her. [REVIEW]Joshua E. Perry, Larry R. Churchill & Howard S. Kirshner - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  37. added 2017-01-25
    Terri Schiavo.Walter Block - 2010 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 22 (1):527-536.
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  38. added 2017-01-25
    What Can Anthropology Contribute to the Terri Schiavo Debate?Barbara Koenig - 2006 - Bioethics Examiner 9.
  39. added 2017-01-21
    Nothing's Settled.Sandra H. Johnson - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (1):50-51.
    Lois Shepherd's book If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions after Terri Schiavo demonstrates a great appreciation for the unresolved conflicts over end-of-life care revealed by the Schiavo case. Through detailed analysis, this book debunks the claim that the controversy defied an established consensus concerning the appropriateness of withdrawing medically administered nutrition and hydration. Arguments that settled legal standards provided a stalwart framework for that consensus failed to appreciate the variations and limitations of those norms. Shepherd (...)
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  40. added 2017-01-21
    If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo.James L. Werth - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (5):402-404.
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  41. added 2017-01-21
    How the Public Responded to the Schiavo Controversy: Evidence From Letters to Editors.E. Racine, M. Karczewska, M. Seidler, R. Amaram & J. Illes - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):571-573.
    The history and genesis of major public clinical ethics controversies is intimately related to the publication of opinions and responses in media coverage. To provide a sample of public response in the media, this paper reports the results of a content analysis of letters to editors published in the four most prolific American newspapers for the Schiavo controversy. Opinions expressed in the letters sampled strongly supported the use of living wills and strongly condemned public attention to the case as well (...)
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  42. added 2017-01-21
    What I Learned From Schiavo.Gerald S. Witherspoon - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (6):17-20.
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  43. added 2017-01-21
    A Review Of: “Mary and Robert Schindler, Suzanne Schindler Vitadamo, and Bobby Schindler. A Life That Matters: The Legacy of Terri Schiavo–A Lesson For Us All”: New York, NY: Warner Books, 2006. 272 Pp. $23.95, Hardcover Michael Schiavo and Michael Hirsh. Terri: The Truth. New York, NY: Dutton, 2006. 384 Pp. $24.95, Hardcover. [REVIEW]Kathy L. Cerminara - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):57-59.
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  44. added 2017-01-21
    Terri Schiavo: Rest in Peace.Charles Weijer - unknown
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  45. added 2017-01-21
    A Death in the Family: Reflections on the Terri Schiavo Case.Charles Weijer - unknown
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  46. added 2017-01-19
    The Schiavo Case: Jurisprudence, Biopower, and Privacy as Singularity.John Protevi - manuscript
    The Terri Schiavo case, the latest high-profile “right-to-die” case in the United States, whose denouement saturated the US mediasphere at the end of March 2005, is a particularly complex problem in the Deleuzean sense. Its solution, which took more than 15 years, actualized lines from legal, medical, biological, political … multiplicities. The ellipses indicate the impossibility of completely delimiting the forces at work in any case (the virtual as endless differentiation) just as it indicates the necessity of cutting through them (...)
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  47. added 2017-01-18
    A Clean Well Lighted Place: In Search of Food Ethics in the 21st Century Grocery Store.Glenn McGee - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):1 – 2.
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  48. added 2017-01-18
    Schiavo's Legacy:.Rebecca Dresser - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):20-22.
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  49. added 2017-01-18
    The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo.Joseph Fins & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):8-8.
  50. added 2017-01-18
    The Schiavo Case:.Eric J. Cassell - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):22-23.
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