Life Support

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
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94 found
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  1. Struggling with the Fragility of Life: A Relational-Narrative Approach to Ethics in Palliative Nursing.Tineke A. Abma - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):337-348.
    In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband’s narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. (...)
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  2. The Significance of a Wish.Felicia Ackerman - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (4):27-29.
  3. Reasons Behind Providing Futile Medical Treatments in Iran.Maryam Aghabarary & Nahid Dehghan Nayeri - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):33-45.
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  4. Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients.Sami Alsolamy - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
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  5. The Long Dying of Nancy Cruzan.George J. Annas - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 19 (1-2):52-59.
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  6. Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion.Joachim Asscher - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
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  7. A. Scola, Quale vita? La bioetica in questione. [REVIEW]R. Barcaro - 2000 - Epistemologia 23 (1):179-180.
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  8. Qui décide de la dignité de mourir? [Who decides the dignity of dying?].Rosangela Barcaro - 2015 - Arc En Ciel. La Revue de Nouveaux Droits de L’Homme (74):16-17.
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  9. Dignità della morte tra eutanasia e medicina palliativa.Rosangela Barcaro - 2007 - In P. Giustiniani & P. Becchi (eds.), La vita tra invenzione e senso. Per una teoresi della bioetica. Graf. pp. 185-199.
    This paper explores the issue of dying with dignity in relation with euthanasia and palliative medicine.
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  10. Stability Over Time in the Preferences of Older Persons for Life-Sustaining Treatment.Ines M. Barrio-Cantalejo, Pablo Simón-Lorda, Adoración Molina-Ruiz, Fátima Herrera-Ramos, Encarnación Martínez-Cruz, Rosa Maria Bailon-Gómez, Antonio López-Rico & Patricia Peinado Gorlat - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):103-114.
    Objective: To measure the stability of life-sustaining treatment preferences amongst older people and analyse the factors that influence stability. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Primary care centres, Granada (Spain). Eighty-five persons age 65 years or older. Participants filled out a questionnaire with six contexts of illness (LSPQ-e). They had to decide whether or not to receive treatment. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and 18 months later. Results: 86 percent of the patients did not change preferences. Sex, age, marital status, (...)
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  11. Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality.Michael K. Bartalos (ed.) - 2009 - Praeger.
    As the team in this volume shows through groundbreaking research, surveys, interviews, and vignettes, death awareness has grown strong, and has changed the way ...
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  12. When Death Enters Life.John Baum - 2003 - Floris.
  13. The Denial of Death.Ernest Becker - 1973 - New York: Free Press.
    Drawing from religion and the human sciences, particularly psychology after Freud, the author attempts to demonstrate that the fear of death is man's central ...
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  14. Stephen W. Smith: End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Care: Principles and Policies for Regulating the Dying Process. [REVIEW]Francis J. Beckwith - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):499-504.
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  15. The Dead Donor Rule: A Defense.Samuel C. M. Birch - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):426-440.
    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the “dead donor rule,” the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are (...)
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  16. Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death.J. P. Bishop - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. (Foucault, 1984, 85)In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern government, the state became exceedingly (...)
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  17. Terri Schiavo.Walter Block - 2010 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 22 (1):527-536.
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  18. Cruzan: Facing the Inevitable.James Bopp & Thomas J. Marzen - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 19 (1-2):37-51.
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  19. Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation.Joseph Boyle - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
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  20. Two Ways to Kill a Patient.Ben Bronner - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):44-63.
    According to the Standard View, a doctor who withdraws life-sustaining treatment does not kill the patient but rather allows the patient to die—an important distinction, according to some. I argue that killing can be understood in either of two ways, and given the relevant understanding, the Standard View is insulated from typical criticisms. I conclude by noting several problems for the Standard View that remain to be fully addressed.
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  21. The Total Artificial Heart and the Dilemma of Deactivation.Ben Bronner - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (4):347-367.
    It is widely believed to be permissible for a physician to discontinue any treatment upon the request of a competent patient. Many also believe it is never permissible for a physician to intentionally kill a patient. I argue that the prospect of deactivating a patient’s artificial heart presents us with a dilemma: either the first belief just mentioned is false or the second one is. Whichever horn of the dilemma we choose has significant implications for contemporary medical ethics.
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  22. A Misunderstanding Concerning Futility.Tommaso Bruni & Charles Weijer - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):59-60.
    It is a comment on Geppert about the concept of futility in cases of treatment-resistant anorexia nervosa.
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  23. The Medicalization of Dying.Michael M. Burgess - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):269-279.
    Physician assisted suicide or active euthanasia is analyzed as a medicalization of the needs of persons who are suffering interminably. As with other medicalized responses to personal needs, the availability of active euthanasia will likely divert attention and resources from difficult social and personal aspects of the needs of dying and suffering persons, continuing the pattern of privatization of the costs of caregiving for persons who are candidates for active euthanasia, limiting the ability of caregivers to assist suffering persons to (...)
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  24. Twenty-Five Years After Quinlan: A Review of the Jurisprudence of Death and Dying. [REVIEW]Norman L. Cantor - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 29 (2):182-196.
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  25. Beyond Schiavo.Arthur L. Caplan & Edward J. Bergman - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):340.
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  26. Medical Decision-Making and the Right to Die After Cruzan.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 19 (1-2):5-8.
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  27. Interactive Capacity, Decisional Capacity, and a Dilemma for Surrogates.Vanessa Carbonell - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (4):36-37.
    In “Conscientious of the Conscious: Interactive Capacity as a Threshold Marker for Consciousness” (2013), Fischer and Truog argue that recent studies showing that some patients diagnosed as being in a vegetative state are in fact in a minimally conscious state raise various ethical questions for clinicians and family members. I argue that these findings raise a further ethical dilemma about how and whether to seek the involvement of the minimally conscious person herself in decisions about her care. There may be (...)
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  28. The Schiavo Case:.Eric J. Cassell - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):22-23.
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  29. A Review Of: “Mary and Robert Schindler, Suzanne Schindler Vitadamo, and Bobby Schindler. A Life That Matters: The Legacy of Terri Schiavo–A Lesson For Us All”. [REVIEW]Kathy Cerminara - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):57-59.
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  30. The Schiavo Maelstrom's Potential Impact on the Law of End-of-Life Decision Making.Kathy L. Cerminara - 2010 - In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
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  31. Saying Goodbye: The Terri Schiavo Case.M. Christopher - 2002 - Bioethics Forum 19 (1-2):37-40.
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  32. On Dying and Dying Well.Donald Coggan - 1977 - Royal Society of Medicine.
    The idea of a happy death is one that startles and disgusts modern man. However, although that phrase is not often used today, that is what the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Donald Coggan, is to some extent considering in his Edwin Stevens lecture given to the Royal Society of Medicine. We are publishing extracts from that lecture by kind permission of the President of the Royal Society of Medicine. We have chosen those passages in the lecture which discuss the limits (...)
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  33. Required Reconsideration of "Do-Not-Resuscitate" Orders in the Operating Room and Certain Other Treatment Settings.Cynthia B. Cohen & Peter J. Cohen - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 20 (4):354-363.
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  34. The Ethics of End-of-Life Care for Prison Inmates.Felicia Cohn - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 27 (3):252-259.
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  35. You Should Not Have Let Your Baby Die.Gary Comstock - 2017 July 12 - New York Times.
    Sam, your newborn son, has been suffocating in your arms for the past 15 minutes. You’re as certain as you can be that he is going to die in the next 15.
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  36. A Common Uniqueness : Medical Facts in the Schiavo Case.Ronald E. Cranford - 2010 - In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
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  37. Withdrawing Artificial Nutrition and Patients' Interests.Ezio Di Nucci - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):555-556.
    I argue that the arguments brought by Counsel for M to the English Court of Protection are morally problematic in prioritising subjective interests that are the result of ‘consistent autonomous thought’ over subjective interests that are the result of a more limited cognitive perspective.
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  38. Language, Metaphysics, and Death.John Donnelly (ed.) - 1994 - Fordham University Press.
    This standard work in thanatology is updated with ten essays new to the second edition, and features a new introduction by Donnelly. The collection addresses certain basic issues inherent in a philosophy of death.
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  39. Schiavo and Contemporary Myths About Dying.Rebecca Dresser - manuscript
    When the Schiavo case burst onto the national scene, most of us assumed that everyone would see the case as we did. But instead, Schiavo showed that U.S. pluralism was alive and well in decisions about life-sustaining treatment. Schiavo demonstrated, too, that at least some of this pluralism reflects misguided myths about human life and death. In this essay, I examine the myths that Schiavo exposed. One such myth is that death with dignity is easily attainable in modern America, as (...)
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  40. Schiavo's Legacy:.Rebecca Dresser - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):20-22.
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  41. Schiavo's Legacy: The Need for an Objective Standard.Rebecca Dresser - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):20-22.
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  42. Schiavo: A Hard Case Makes Questionable Law.Rebecca Dresser - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):8-9.
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  43. ""Commentary on" Beyond Schiavo": Beyond Theory.Nancy Neveloff Dubler - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):346.
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  44. Pt. IV. The End of Life. The Definition of Death / Stuart Youngner ; The Aging Society and the Expansion of Senility: Biotechnological and Treatment Goals / Stephen Post ; Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents / Felicia Nimue Ackerman ; Precedent Autonomy, Advance Directives, and End-of-Life Care / John K. Davis ; Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. [REVIEW]Gerald Dworkin - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
  45. The Continuing Assault on Personal Autonomy in the Wake of the Schiavo Case.Jon B. Eisenberg - 2010 - In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
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  46. The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo.J. Finnis & Nd Schiff - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4).
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  47. The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo.Joseph Fins & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):8-8.
  48. Terri Schiavo and the Culture Wars : Ethics Vs. Politics.Kenneth W. Goodman - 2010 - In The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
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  49. After Schiavo.Jacqulyn Kay Hall - 2005 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 7 (3):94-98.
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  50. The Legacy of Terri Schiavo for the Nonreligious.Nat Hentoff - 2005 - Free Inquiry 25.
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1 — 50 / 94