This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

410 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 410
  1. Darwinism and Meaning.Lonnie W. Aarssen - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):296-311.
    Darwinism presents a paradox. It discredits the notion that one’s life has any intrinsic meaning, yet it predicts that we are designed by Darwinian natural selection to generally insist that it must—and so necessarily designed to misunderstand and doubt Darwinism. The implications of this paradox are explored here, including the question of where then does the Darwinist find meaning in life? The main source, it is proposed, is from cognitive domains for meaning inherited from sentient ancestors—domains that reveal our evolved (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Biology as History: Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan. Vol. 1: Systematic Biology as an Historical Science. Giovanni Pinna, Michael T. GhiselinBiology as History: Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan. Vol. 2: New Perspectives on the History of Life: Essays on Systematic Biology as Historical Narrative. Michael T. Ghiselin, Giovanni Pinna. [REVIEW]Kraig Adler - 1998 - Isis 89 (3):584-585.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. The Wholeness of the Living Organism.W. E. Agar - 1948 - Philosophy of Science 15 (3):179-191.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. A Contribution to the Theory of the Living Organism.Wilfred Eade Agar - 1943 - Melbourne, Melbourne University Press in Association with Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  5. On Manufactured Life and the Biology of the Impossible.Arantza Etxeberria Agiriano & Marila Lázaro Olaizola - 2008 - Ludus Vitalis 16 (29):105-126.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Vitalism and System.Rolf Ahlers - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (1):83-113.
    This paper thematizes the crucial agreement and point of departure between Jacobi and Fichte at the height of the “atheism controversy.” The argument on the proper relationship between philosophy and existence or speculation and life had far-reaching consequences in the history of thought after Jacobi and Fichte in German Idealism on the one hand, primarly advocated by Schelling and Hegel, and on the other hand by existentialism and vitalism. The essay focuses first on Jacobi’s philosophy of life, which centrally influenced (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Towards a Hierarchical Definition of Life, the Organism, and Death.Gerard A. J. M. Jagers op Akkerhuis - 2010 - Foundations of Science 15 (3):245-262.
    Despite hundreds of definitions, no consensus exists on a definition of life or on the closely related and problematic definitions of the organism and death. These problems retard practical and theoretical development in, for example, exobiology, artificial life, biology and evolution. This paper suggests improving this situation by basing definitions on a theory of a generalized particle hierarchy. This theory uses the common denominator of the “operator” for a unified ranking of both particles and organisms, from elementary particles to animals (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8. Extrapolating a Hierarchy of Building Block Systems Towards Future Neural Network Organisms.Gerard Jagers op Akkerhuis - 2001 - Acta Biotheoretica 49 (3):171-189.
    It is possible to predict future life forms? In this paper it is argued that the answer to this question may well be positive. As a basis for predictions a rationale is used that is derived from historical data, e.g. from a hierarchical classification that ranks all building block systems, that have evolved so far. This classification is based on specific emergent properties that allow stepwise transitions, from low level building blocks to higher level ones. This paper shows how this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Life as Vision : Bergson and the Future of Seeing Differently.Alia Al-Saji - 2010 - In Michael R. Kelly (ed.), Bergson and Phenomenology. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  10. [The Phenomenon of Life].Christopher Alexander & Center for Environmental Structure - 2002
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Natural Selection and the Origin of Life.Gordon Allen - 1970 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 14 (1):109-126.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Metabolism in a-Life: Reply to Boden.Mark Alliksaar - 2001 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):131-135.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Prégnances du devenir. Simondon et les images.Emmanuel Alloa - 2015 - Critique 816:356-371.
    Problématisation, individuation, (dés)adaptation L’inventivité du vivant : la « disparation » Mouvements à vide. La spontanéité selon Simondon La prégnance des images Ontogenèse, phylogenèse, eikogenèse. L’image comme médiation .
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Homeostatic Organization, Emergence, and Reduction in Biological Phenomena.Robert Arp - 2007 - Philosophia Naturalis 44 (2):238-270.
    In this paper, I argue that starting with the organelles that constitute a cell - and continuing up the hierarchy of components in processes and subsystems of an organism - there exist clear instances of emergent biological phenomena that can be considered,,living" entities. These components and their attending processes are living emergent phenomena because of the way in which the components are organized to maintain homeostasis of the organism at the various levels in the hierarchy. I call this view the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. My Philosophy of Life.John Ashbery - 2009 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Problem of Life. An Essay in the Origins of Biological Thought.M. B. B. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):535-536.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Phenomenology as the Original Science of Life in Heidegger’s Early Freiburg Lectures.Lee Michael Badger - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (1):28-43.
    The aim of this essay is to introduce an original and radical phenomenology of life into Heidegger’s earliest lectures at Freiburg University. The motivation behind this aim lies in the exclusion of life from the existential analytic despite Heidegger’s preoccupation with the question of life during this very early period. Principally, the essay demonstrates how Husserl’s phenomenological insight into the intentionality of life has the potential to be transformed into a living aporia. Although this demonstration is set within the general (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Is Life Improbable?John C. Baez - 1989 - Foundations of Physics 19 (1):91-95.
    E. P. Wigner 's argument that the probability of the existence of self-reproducing units, e.g., organisms, is zero according to standard quantum theory is stated and analyzed. Theorems are presented which indicate that Wigner 's mathematical result in fact should not be interpreted as asserting the improbability of self-reproducing units.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Kinds of Life. On the Phenomenological Basis of the Distinction Between Higher and Lower Animals.Christiane Bailey - 2011 - Journal of Environmental Philosophy 8 (2):47-68.
    Drawing upon Husserl and Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological constitution of the Other through Einfülhung, I argue that the hierarchical distinction between higher and lower animals – which has been dismissed by Heidegger for being anthropocentric – must not be conceived as an objective distinction between “primitive” animals and “more evolved” ones, but rather corresponds to a phenomenological distinction between familiar and unfamiliar animals.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. The Genesis of Existentials in Animal Life: Heidegger's Appropriation of Aristotle's Ontology of Life.Christiane Bailey - 2011 - Heidegger Circle Proceedings 1 (1):199-212.
    Paper presented at the Heidegger Circle 2011. Although Aristotle’s influence on young Heidegger’s thought has been studied at length, such studies have almost exclusively focused on his interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics, physics and metaphysics. I will rather address Heidegger’s appropriation of Aristotle’s ontology of life. Focusing on recently published or recently translated courses of the mid 20’s (mainly SS 1924, WS 1925-26 and SS 1926), I hope to uncover an important aspect of young Heidegger’s thought left unconsidered: namely, that Dasein’s (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. On the Origin and Evolution of Life: An Introduction.H. Baltscheffsky, C. Blomberg, H. Liljenström & B. I. B. Lindahl - 1997 - Journal of Theoretical Biology 187 (4).
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Life, Movement, and Desire.Renaud Barbaras - 2008 - Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):3-17.
    In French, the verb "to live" designates both being alive and the experience of something. This ambiguity has a philosophical meaning. The task of a phenomenology of life is to describe an originary sense of living from which the very distinction between life in the intransitive sense and life in the transitive, or intentional, sense proceeds. Hans Jonas is one of those rare authors who has tried to give an account of the specificity of life instead of reducing life to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Life Is Semiosis.Marcello Barbieri - 2008 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):29-52.
    The idea that life is based on signs and codes, i.e., that “Life is semiosis”, has been strongly suggested by the discovery of the genetic code, but so far it has made little impact, and is largely regarded as philosophy rather than science. The main reason for this is that there are at least three basic concepts in modern biology that keep semiosis squarely out of organic life. The first is the classical model that describes the cell as a biological (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24. A Constant of Temporal Structure in the Human Hierarchy and Other Systems.Peter W. Barlow - 1992 - Acta Biotheoretica 40 (4):321-328.
    The levels that compose biological hierarchies each have their own energetic, spatial and temporal structure. Indeed, it is the discontinuity in energy relationships between levels, as well as the similarity of sub-systems that support them, that permits levels to be defined. In this paper, the temporal structure of living hierarchies, in particular that pertaining to Human society, is examined. Consideration is given to the period defining the lifespan of entities at each level and to a periodic event considered fundamental to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. An Answer to Schrödinger's What is Life?Gérard Battail - 2011 - Biosemiotics 4 (1):55-67.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26. Modern Science and the Nature of Life [by William S. Beck]. [REVIEW]William B. Bean - 1958 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 1 (4):457-458.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. A Functional Account of Degrees of Minimal Chemical Life.Mark A. Bedau - 2012 - Synthese 185 (1):73-88.
    This paper describes and defends the view that minimal chemical life essentially involves the chemical integration of three chemical functionalities: containment, metabolism, and program (Rasmussen et al. in Protocells: bridging nonliving and living matter, 2009a ). This view is illustrated and explained with the help of CMP and Rasmussen diagrams (Rasmussen et al. In: Rasmussen et al. (eds.) in Protocells: bridging nonliving and living matter, 71–100, 2009b ), both of which represent the key chemical functional dependencies among containment, metabolism, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. The Nature of Life: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives From Philosophy and Science.Mark Bedau & Carol Cleland (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Bringing together the latest scientific advances and some of the most enduring subtle philosophical puzzles and problems, this book collects original historical and contemporary sources to explore the wide range of issues surrounding the nature of life. Selections ranging from Aristotle and Descartes to Sagan and Dawkins are organised around four broad themes covering classical discussions of life, the origins and extent of natural life, contemporary artificial life creations and the definition and meaning of 'life' in its most general form. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Problemas Biologicos Ensayo de Interpretacion Dialectica Materialista. Prólogo de Marcel Prenant.Enrique Beltrán - 1945 - Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad de Nuevo León.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Nothing is Alive (We Only Say So).Jiri Benovsky - forthcoming - Think.
    Finding an adequate definition of "life" has proven to be a tricky affair. In this article, I discuss the idea that nothing is really alive: we only say so. I shall argue that 'being alive' is not a genuine property of things, and that it only reflects the way we think and talk about things. An eliminativist strategy will then allow us to free ourselves from the burden of having to find a definition of life, and will allow us to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. The Genetic Code and the Origin of Life.Josef Berger - 1976 - Acta Biotheoretica 25 (4):259-263.
    The problem of the origin of life understandably counts as one of the most exciting questions in the natural sciences, but in spite of almost endless speculation on this subject, it is still far from its final solution. The complexity of the functional correlation between recent nucleic acids and proteins can e.g. give rise to the assumption that the genetic code (and life) could not originate on the Earth. It was Portelli (1975) who published the hypothesis that the genetic code (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life: Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives.Constance M. Bertka (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Astrobiology in societal context Constance Bertka; Part I. Origin of Life: 2. Emergence and the experimental pursuit of the origin of life Robert Hazen; 3. From Aristotle to Darwin, to Freeman Dyson: changing definitions of life viewed in historical context James Strick; 4. Philosophical aspects of the origin-of-life problem: the emergence of life and the nature of science Iris Fry; 5. The origin of terrestrial life: a Christian perspective Ernan McMullin; 6. The alpha and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Is Defining Life Pointless? Operational Definitions at the Frontiers of Biology.Leonardo Bich & Sara Green - 2017 - Synthese:1-28.
    Despite numerous and increasing attempts to define what life is, there is no consensus on necessary and sufficient conditions for life. Accordingly, some scholars have questioned the value of definitions of life and encouraged scientists and philosophers alike to discard the project. As an alternative to this pessimistic conclusion, we argue that critically rethinking the nature and uses of definitions can provide new insights into the epistemic roles of definitions of life for different research practices. This paper examines the possible (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Life-Based Teleology and the Foundations of Ethics.Harry Binswanger - 1992 - The Monist 75 (1):84-103.
  35. Biology and the Riddle of Life.Charles Birch - 1999
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. The Liberation of Life: From the Cell to the Community.Charles Birch - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the liberation of the concept of life from the bondage fashioned by the interpreters of life ever since biology began, and about the liberation of the life of humans and non-humans alike from the bondage of social structures and behaviour, which now threatens the fullness of life's possibilities if not survival itself. It falls into a tradition of writings about human problems from a perspective informed by biology. It rejects the mechanistic model of life dominant in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  37. Life, Inwardness and Struggle. The Definition of Life in the Thought of H. Plessner and H. Jonas.Carlos Blanco - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (151):129-141.
    El objetivo de este artículo es examinar la definición de "vida" en el pensamiento de Helmut Plessner y de Hans Jonas, para, con base en las evidencias biológicas y las reflexiones de estos autores, plantear la pregunta por las categorías fundamentales que diferencian lo vital de lo inerte, que son, a nuestro juicio, tres: la célula como unidad estructural y funcional, la transmisión de información genética, y la evolución por selección natural. The objective of the article is to explore the (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Theories on the Nature of Life.Giovanni Blandino - 1969 - New York: Philosophical Library.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Problems of Life Research: Physiological Analyses and Phenomenological Interpretations.Wilhelm Blasius - 1976 - Springer Verlag.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Is Metabolism Necessary?MA Boden - 1999 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):231-248.
    Metabolism is a criterion of life. Three senses are distinguished. The weakest allows strong A-Life: virtual creatures having physical existence in computer electronics, but not bodies, are classes as 'alive'. The second excludes strong A-Life but allows that some non-biochemical A-Life robots could be classed as alive. The third, which stresses the body's self-production by energy budgeting and self-equilibrating energy exchanges of some (necessary) complexity, excludes both strong A-Life and living non-biochemical robots.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  41. Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge.Niels Bohr - 1958 - New York: Wiley.
    These articles and speeches by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist date from 1934 to 1958. Rather than expositions on quantum physics, the papers are philosophical in nature, exploring the relevance of atomic physics to many areas of human endeavor. Includes an essay in which Bohr and Einstein discuss quantum and_wave equation theories. 1961 edition.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   104 citations  
  42. Where Are They?Nick Bostrom - manuscript
    When water was discovered on Mars, people got very excited. Where there is water, there may be life. Scientists are planning new missions to study the planet up close. NASA’s next Mars rover is scheduled to arrive in 2010. In the decade following, a Mars Sample Return mission might be launched, which would use robotic systems to collect samples of Martian rocks, soils, and atmosphere, and return them to Earth. We could then analyze the sample to see if it contains (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43. Symbiosis, Lateral Function Transfer and the (Many) Saplings of Life.Frédéric Bouchard - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):623-641.
    One of intuitions driving the acceptance of a neat structured tree of life is the assumption that organisms and the lineages they form have somewhat stable spatial and temporal boundaries. The phenomenon of symbiosis shows us that such ‘fixist’ assumptions does not correspond to how the natural world actually works. The implications of lateral gene transfer (LGT) have been discussed elsewhere; I wish to stress a related point. I will focus on lateral function transfer (LFT) and will argue, using examples (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  44. Life's Splendid Drama: Evolutionary Biology and the Reconstruction of Life's Ancestry, 1860-1940.Peter J. Bowler - 1997 - Journal of the History of Biology 30 (2):303-306.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  45. Origin and Early Evolution of Life, Tom Fenchel and Life Evolving, Christian de Duve.A. Brack - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (11):1139-1140.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Book Reviews: Origin and Early Evolution of Life & Life Evolving.André Brack - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (11):1139-1140.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Kant on Biology and the Experience of Life.Angela Breitenbach - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 19-30.
  48. Taking the Name of Science in Vain.Horace James Bridges - 1928 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
    TAKING THE NAME OF SCIENCE IN VAIN CHAPTER I THE MEANING OF LIFE AND ITS VALUES 1. THE ROOT CAUSE OF THE PRESENT DISCONTENTS He in whose honor these ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Ancient Biomolecules: Their Origins, Fossilization, and Role in Revealing the History of Life.Derek E. G. Briggs & Roger E. Summons - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (5):482-490.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Life, Death and Sonic Hedgehog.Joanne M. Britto, David Tannahill & Roger J. Keynes - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (6):499-502.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 410