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  1. Indexical and Symbolic Referencing: What Role Do They Play in Children's Success on Theory of Mind Tasks?Ahmad Abu-Akel & Alison L. Bailey - 2001 - Cognition 80 (3):263-281.
  2. The Innate Endowment for Language.Mark C. Baker - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 156--174.
    This chapter examines two different views of universal grammar. Most linguists assume that universal grammar is underspecified — providing us with an incomplete grammar to be elaborated by learning. But the alternative is that it is overspecified — providing us with a full range of possible grammars from which we select one on the basis of environmental input. Underspecification is now the dominant view in the developmental sciences, and is often treated as the null hypothesis on grounds of greater possibility, (...)
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  3. Language and Character.Robin Barrow - 2004 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 3 (3):267-279.
    Recent empirical research into the brain, while reinforcing the view that we are extensively ‘programmed’, does not refute the idea of a distinctive human mind. The human mind is primarily a product of the human capacity for a distinctive kind of language. Human language is thus what gives us our consciousness, reasoning capacity and autonomy. To study and understand the human, however, is ultimately a task beyond empirical disciplines such as psychology. Literature is the repository of wisdom relating to humanity (...)
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  4. Poverty of the Stimulus' Revisited: Recent Challenges Reconsidered.Robert Berwick & Noam Chomsky - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 383.
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  5. Understanding Language: A Luddite Approach.Martin Andrew Brown - 1993 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    According to Chomsky, the ability to speak and understand a language rests in part on knowledge of complex and abstract grammatical rules. This knowledge is used, when a person speaks or understands a sentence, to generate structural descriptions, analogous to those devised by linguists, at an unconscious level of the speaker's or hearer's mind. Speaking and understanding thus involve complex, mental activity akin to translation. Chomsky holds that this activity should be thought of as processes in the brain. ;I argue (...)
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  6. Why Grammar Cannot Be Innate.Robert W. Burch - 1976 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):37-44.
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  7. Distinctively Human Thinking.Peter Carruthers - 1998 - In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 69.
    This chapter takes up, and sketches an answer to, the main challenge facing massively modular theories of the architecture of the human mind. This is to account for the distinctively flexible, non-domain-specific, character of much human thinking. I shall show how the appearance of a modular language faculty within an evolving modular architecture might have led to these distinctive features of human thinking with only minor further additions and non-domain-specific adaptations.
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  8. Language and Cognition.Noam Chomsky - 1997 - In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press. pp. 15--31.
  9. Linguistics and Cognitive Science: Problems and Mysteries.Noam Chomsky - 1991 - In Aka Kasher (ed.), The Chomskyan Turn. Blackwell. pp. 26--53.
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  10. Rules and Representations.Noam A. Chomsky - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (127):1-61.
    The book from which these sections are excerpted is concerned with the prospects for assimilating the study of human intelligence and its products to the natural sciences through the investigation of cognitive structures, understood as systems of rules and representations that can be regarded as These mental structui′es serve as the vehicles for the exercise of various capacities. They develop in the mind on the basis of an innate endowment that permits the growth of rich and highly articulated structures along (...)
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  11. Reflections On Language.Noam A. Chomsky - 1976 - Temple Smith.
  12. Philosophy of Linguistics.John Collins, Robert J. Matthews, Barry C. Smith & Brian Epstein - 2008 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22).
  13. What's Within?: Nativism Reconsidered.Fiona Cowie - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This powerfully iconoclastic book reconsiders the influential nativist position toward the mind. Nativists assert that some concepts, beliefs, or capacities are innate or inborn: "native" to the mind rather than acquired. Fiona Cowie argues that this view is mistaken, demonstrating that nativism is an unstable amalgam of two quite different--and probably inconsistent--theses about the mind. Unlike empiricists, who postulate domain-neutral learning strategies, nativists insist that some learning tasks require special kinds of skills, and that these skills are hard-wired into our (...)
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  14. Innate Ideas.Fiona Cowie - 1994 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    Recent years have seen a renewal of the perennial debate concerning innate ideas: Noam Chomsky has argued that much of our knowledge of natural languages is innate; Jerry Fodor has defended the innateness of most concepts. ;Part One concerns the historical controversy over nativism. On the interpretation there developed, nativists have defended two distinct theses. One, based on arguments from the poverty of the stimulus, is a psychological theory postulating special-purpose learning mechanisms. The other, deriving from arguments entailing that learning (...)
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  15. Children's Command of Negation.Stephen Crain - manuscript
    Poverty -of-stimulus arguments have taken new ground recently, augmented by experimental findings from th e study of child language. In this paper, we briefly review two variants of the poverty-of-stimulus argument that have received empirical support from studies of child language; then we examine a third argument of this kind in more detail. The case under discussion involves the structural notion of c-command as it pertains to children’s interpretation of disjunction in the scope of negation.
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  16. Is Displacement Possible Without Language? Evidence From Preverbal Infants and Chimpanzees.Valentina Cuccio & Marco Carapezza - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (3):369-386.
    Is displacement possible without language? This question was addressed in a recent work by Liszkowski and colleagues . The authors carried out an experiment to demonstrate that 12-month-old prelinguistic infants can communicate about absent entities by using pointing gestures, while chimpanzees cannot. The main hypothesis of their study is that displacement does not depend on language but is, however, exclusively human and instead depends on species-specific social-cognitive human skills. Against this hypothesis, we will argue that a symbolic representation is needed (...)
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  17. Innate Knowledge and Linguistic Principles.Peter W. Culiover - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):615-616.
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  18. Reflections on Language and Mind.Daniel C. Dennett - 1998 - In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 284.
    A theme that emerged at the Sheffield Conference with particular force, to my way of thinking, was a new way of recognizing, and then avoiding, a seductive bad idea. One of its many guises is what I have called the Cartesian Theater, but it also appears in the roles of Central Processing, or Central Executive, or Norman and Shallice's SAS, or Fodor's non-modular central arena of belief fixation. What is wrong with this idea is not (just) that it (apparently) postulates (...)
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  19. Computational Approaches to Language Acquisition.Jeff Elman - 2006 - In Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. pp. 2--726.
  20. The Myth of Language Universals: Language Diversity and its Importance for Cognitive Science.Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):429-448.
    Talk of linguistic universals has given cognitive scientists the impression that languages are all built to a common pattern. In fact, there are vanishingly few universals of language in the direct sense that all languages exhibit them. Instead, diversity can be found at almost every level of linguistic organization. This fundamentally changes the object of enquiry from a cognitive science perspective. This target article summarizes decades of cross-linguistic work by typologists and descriptive linguists, showing just how few and unprofound the (...)
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  21. Linguistic Theory and Language Acquisition: A Note on Structure-Dependence.Robert Freidin - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):618-619.
  22. Psychological Models Often Assume That Young Children Learn Words and Concepts Bymeansof Associative Learning Mechanisms, Without the Need to Posit Any Innate Predispositions. For Example, Smith, Jones, and Landau (1996) Propose That Children Learn Concepts by Hearing Specific Linguistic Frames While Viewing Specific Object Properties. The Environment Provides All the Information That Children Need; the Conjunction of Sights and Sounds is Proposed to Be Sufficient to Enable Children. [REVIEW]Susan A. Gelman - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--198.
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  23. Stephen Crain & Rosalind Thornton, Investigations in Universal Gram-Mar: A Guide to Experiments on the Acquisition of Syntax and Semantics. [REVIEW]Bart Geurts - 2000 - Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (5):523-532.
  24. Solving the Language Origins Puzzle: Collecting and Assembling All Pertinent Pieces.Kathleen R. Gibson - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):189-190.
    Wilkins & Wakefield fall short of solving the language origin puzzle because they underestimate the cognitive and linguistic capacities of great apes. A focus on ape capacities leads to the recognition of varied levels of cognition and language and to a gradualistic model of language emergence in which early hominid language skills exceed those of the apes but fall far short of those of modern humans or later fossil hominid groups.
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  25. Aspects of Human Language: Where Motherese?Emmanuel Gilissen - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):514-514.
    Human language is a peculiar primate communication tool because of its large neocortical substrate, comparable to the structural substrates of cognitive systems. Although monkey calls and human language rely on different structures, neural substrate for human language emotional coding, prosody, and intonation is already part of nonhuman primate vocalization circuitry. Motherese could be an aspect of language at the crossing or at the origin of communicative and cognitive content.
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  26. The Cognitive Value of Language.Stavroula N. Glezakos - 2003 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    The central question that I address in this dissertation is: how should we explain our connection with the language that we use? I show that the way that one answers the question depends upon the characterization that one gives of the nature of language. ;I argue that philosophers of language who theorize about words as in-the-world entities with a history have largely failed to explain how we use such words. To fill in this gap, I offer a positive account of (...)
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  27. But Do We Need Universal Grammar? Comment on Lidz Et Al.Adele E. Goldberg - 2004 - Cognition 94 (1):77-84.
  28. Genetic Language Impairment: Unruly Grammars.Myrna Gopnik, Jenny Dalalakis, S. E. Fukuda, Suzy Fukuda & E. Kehayia - 1996 - Proceedings of the British Academy 88:223-249.
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  29. The Effect of First Written Language on the Acquisition of English Literacy.Alison Holm & Barbara Dodd - 1996 - Cognition 59 (2):119-147.
    The relationship between first and second language literacy was examined by identifying the skills and processes developed in the first language that were transferred to the second language. The performance of 40 university students from The People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, Vietnam and Australia were compared on a series of tasks that assessed phonological awareness and reading and spelling skills in English. The results indicated that the Hong Kong students (with non-alphabetic first language literacy) had limited phonological awareness compared (...)
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  30. Lexicalisation and the Origin of the Human Mind.Thomas J. Hughes & J. T. M. Miller - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (1):11-27.
    This paper will discuss the origin of the human mind, and the qualitative discontinuity between human and animal cognition. We locate the source of this discontinuity within the language faculty, and thus take the origin of the mind to depend on the origin of the language faculty. We will look at one such proposal put forward by Hauser et al. (Science 298:1569-1579, 2002), which takes the evolution of a Merge trait (recursion) to solely explain the differences between human and animal (...)
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  31. Cognitive Schemes and Their Possible Relativons to Language Acquisition.B. Inhelder - 1980 - In Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini (ed.), Language and Learning: The Debate Between Jean Piaget and Noam Chomsky. Harvard University Press.
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  32. Patterns in the Mind: Language And.R. Jackendoff - forthcoming - Human Nature.
  33. Biological Notions of Innateness and Explanation of Language Acquisition.Mika Kiikeri & Tomi Kokkonen - 2007 - In Johannes Persson & Petri Ylikoski (eds.), Rethinking Explanation. Springer. pp. 177--192.
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  34. The Foundation Walls That Are Carried by the House: A Critique of the Poverty of Stimulus Thesis and a Wittgensteinian—Dennettian Alternative.Wendy Lee - 1998 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 19 (2):177-194.
    A bedrock assumption made by cognitivist philosophers such as Noam Chomsky, and, more recently, Jerry Fodor and Steven Pinker is that the contexts within which children acquire a language inevitably exhibit a irremediable poverty of whatever stimuli are necessary to condition such acquisition and development. They argue that given this poverty, the basic rudiments of language must be innate; the task of the cognitivist is to theorize universal grammars, languages of thought, or language instincts to account for it. My argument, (...)
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  35. Negative Evidence in Language Acquisition.Gary F. Marcus - 1993 - Cognition 46 (1):53-85.
  36. Genetics of Language.Ningombam Bupenda Meitei - 2013 - viXra.Org:7.
    The paper intends to zoom in and find a uniqueness in human language by narrowing down the range of cognitive domains to human computational mind having a property of recursion which is exclusively unique to human and not in any other species in animalia kingdom.This notion of recursion is the centrality of the paper. There has been an opposition to the notion of recursion being only unique to human and the paper makes an attempt to reply to such arguments using (...)
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  37. Universal Moral Grammar: Theory, Evidence, and the Future.John Mikhail - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):143 –152.
    Scientists from various disciplines have begun to focus attention on the psychology and biology of human morality. One research program that has recently gained attention is universal moral grammar (UMG). UMG seeks to describe the nature and origin of moral knowledge by using concepts and models similar to those used in Chomsky's program in linguistics. This approach is thought to provide a fruitful perspective from which to investigate moral competence from computational, ontogenetic, behavioral, physiological and phylogenetic perspectives. In this article, (...)
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  38. The Philosophical Dimensions of the Theory of the Innateness of Language.M. Moradiyan - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 26.
    This paper presents a study of the philosophical dimensions of the innateness of language. In this regard, reference has been made to the ideas of Chomsky, De Saussaure, Descartes, Kant, Russell, Plato, and Aristotle. The writers of this article have paid special attention to understanding the relationships between the structure of language and the structure of mind, or the relationships between syntax and logic, and believe that they are inseparable from each other.The article consists of two main parts. The first (...)
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  39. Categorial Grammar and Lexical-Functional Grammar.Reinhard Muskens - unknown
    This paper introduces λ-grammar, a form of categorial grammar that has much in common with LFG. Like other forms of categorial grammar, λ-grammars are multi-dimensional and their components are combined in a strictly parallel fashion. Grammatical representations are combined with the help of linear combinators, closed pure λ-terms in which each abstractor binds exactly one variable. Mathematically this is equivalent to employing linear logic, in use in LFG for semantic composition, but the method seems more practicable.
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  40. Although Linguistic Nativism has Received the Bulk of Attention in Contemporary.Shaun Nichols - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--353.
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  41. The Language Faculty.Paul Pietroski & Stephen Crain - unknown
  42. The Reality of a Universal Language Faculty.Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):465-466.
    While endorsing Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) call for rigorous documentation of variation, we defend the idea of Universal Grammar as a toolkit of language acquisition mechanisms. The authors exaggerate diversity by ignoring the space of conceivable but nonexistent languages, trivializing major design universals, conflating quantitative with qualitative variation, and assuming that the utility of a linguistic feature suffices to explain how children acquire it.
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  43. Empirical Assessment of Stimulus Poverty Arguments.Geoffrey K. Pullum - 2002 - Linguistic Review.
  44. The 'Innateness Hypothesis' and Explanatory Models in Linguistics.Hilary Putnam - 1967 - Synthese 17 (March):12-22.
  45. Connectionism and Three Levels of Nativism.William Ramsey & Stephen P. Stich - 1990 - Synthese 82 (2):177-205.
    Along with the increasing popularity of connectionist language models has come a number of provocative suggestions about the challenge these models present to Chomsky's arguments for nativism. The aim of this paper is to assess these claims. We begin by reconstructing Chomsky's argument from the poverty of the stimulus and arguing that it is best understood as three related arguments, with increasingly strong conclusions. Next, we provide a brief introduction to connectionism and give a quick survey of recent efforts to (...)
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  46. The Concrete Universal and Cognitive Science.Richard Shillcock - 2014 - Axiomathes 24 (1):63-80.
    Cognitive science depends on abstractions made from the complex reality of human behaviour. Cognitive scientists typically wish the abstractions in their theories to be universals, but seldom attend to the ontology of universals. Two sorts of universal, resulting from Galilean abstraction and materialist abstraction respectively, are available in the philosophical literature: the abstract universal—the one-over-many universal—is the universal conventionally employed by cognitive scientists; in contrast, a concrete universal is a material entity that can appear within the set of entities it (...)
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  47. Appreciating the Poverty of the Stimulus in Second Language Acquisition.Rex A. Sprouse - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):742-743.
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  48. The Phylogeny and Ontogeny of Adaptations.Thomas E. Dickins - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):283-284.
    Locke & Bogin (L&B) rightly point to the absence of ontogeny in theories of language evolution. However, they overly rely upon ontogenetic data to isolate components of the language faculty. Only an adaptationist analysis, of the sort seen in evolutionary psychology, can carve language at its joints and lead to testable predictions about how language works.
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  49. Grammatical Language Impairment and the Specificity of Cognitive Domains: Relations Between Auditory and Language Abilities.Heather K. J. Van der Lely, Stuart Rosen & Alan Adlard - 2004 - Cognition 94 (2):167-183.
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  50. Grammatical Language Impairment and the Specificity of Cognitive Domains: Relations Between Auditory and Language Abilities.H. Vanderlely, S. RoSen & A. AdlArd - 2004 - Cognition 94 (2):167-183.
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