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  1. added 2018-12-31
    Schulzowska (anty)filozofia, czyli otwierający nienaukowy dopisek.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2014 - In Joanna Michalik & Przemysław Bursztyka (eds.), Schulz: między mitem a filozofią. Gdańsk: Wydawnictwo Słowo/Obraz Terytoria. pp. 353-357.
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  2. added 2018-12-31
    "Szczeliny w nieskończoność..." Brunona Schulza metafizyka śladu.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2014 - In Joanna Michalik & Przemysław Bursztyka (eds.), Schulz: między mitem a filozofią. Gdańsk: Wydawnictwo Słowo/Obraz Terytoria. pp. 123-153.
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  3. added 2018-12-31
    Schulz: między mitem a filozofią.Joanna Michalik & Przemysław Bursztyka (eds.) - 2014 - Gdańsk: Wydawnictwo Słowo/Obraz Terytoria.
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  4. added 2018-12-30
    Schulzowska (anty)filozofia, czyli otwierający nienaukowy dopisek.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2014 - In Joanna Michalik & Przemysław Bursztyka (eds.), Schulz: między mitem a filozofią. Gdańsk: Wydawnictwo Słowo/Obraz Terytoria. pp. 353-357.
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  5. added 2018-11-23
    Oscar Wilde on the Theory of the Author.Andrea Selleri - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):49-66.
    That Oscar Wilde was a central figure for aestheticism needs no arguing; that he should be taken seriously as an aesthetician is perhaps a less obvious matter. While much of his work concerns itself with the traditional purview of aesthetics as a philosophical discipline, commentators have rarely granted his writings that attention to ideas qua ideas that marks off a philosophical interest in a writer's oeuvre from other types of analysis. A number of attempts to tackle Wilde's pronouncements in a (...)
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  6. added 2018-09-08
    Resemblance and Identity in Wallace Stevens' Conception of Metaphor.Richmond Kwesi - forthcoming - In Jakub Mácha & Kacper Bartczak (eds.), Wallace Stevens: Poetry, Philosophy, and Figurative Language. Berlin, Germany: pp. 113-138.
    Aristotle and the classical rhetoricians conceived of metaphor as a figure of speech in which one thing is given a name or an attribute of another thing on the basis of some resemblance that exists between the two things. Wallace Stevens conceived of metaphor not as the production of pre-existing resemblances observed in nature but the “creation of resemblance by the imagination” (NA: 72). Resemblance, and not identity, according to Stevens, is the fundamental relation between the two terms of metaphor. (...)
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  7. added 2018-06-23
    A Theater of Ideas: Performance and Performativity in Kierkegaard’s Repetition.Martijn Boven - 2018 - In Eric Jozef Ziolkowski (ed.), Kierkegaard, Literature, and the Arts. Evanston, IL, USA: pp. 115-130.
    In this essay, I argue that Søren Kierkegaard’s oeuvre can be seen as a theater of ideas. This argument is developed in three steps. First, I will briefly introduce a theoretical framework for addressing the theatrical dimension of Kierkegaard’s works. This framework is based on a distinction between“performative writing strategies” and “categories of performativity.” As a second step, I will focus on Repetition: A Venture in Experimenting Psychology, by Constantin Constantius, one of the best examples of Kierkegaard’s innovative way of (...)
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  8. added 2018-06-23
    Metaphor and Metamorphosis: Paul Ricoeur and Gilles Deleuze on the Emergence of Novelty.Martijn Boven - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Groningen
    This dissertation focuses on the problem of novelty as seen from the perspective of two French philosophers: Paul Ricoeur and Gilles Deleuze. As such, a new interpretation of the works of these two philosophers is developed. I argue that two models can be derived from their works: a model that strives to make tensions productive (based on Ricoeur) and a model that aims to organize encounters between bodies (taken from Deleuze). These models are developed on their own terms without superimposing (...)
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  9. added 2018-06-05
    Mental Imagery in the Experience of Literary Narrative: Views From Embodied Cognition.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2013 - Dissertation, Stockholm University
    Defined as vicarious sensorimotor experiencing, mental imagery is a powerful source of aesthetic enjoyment in everyday life and, reportedly, one of the commonest things readers remember about literary narratives in the long term. Furthermore, it is positively correlated with other dimensions of reader response, most notably with emotion. Until recent decades, however, the phenomenon of mental imagery has been largely overlooked by modern literary scholarship. As an attempt to strengthen the status of mental imagery within the literary and, more generally, (...)
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  10. added 2018-05-15
    The Role of Philosophy in a Multicultural Society: Between Reason and Imagination.Tatiana Cárová - 2011 - Human Affairs 21 (2):213-219.
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  11. added 2018-05-15
    Representation and the Imagination Beckett, Kafka, Nabokov, and Schoenberg /Daniel Albright. --. --.Daniel Albright - 1981 - University of Chicago Press, 1981.
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  12. added 2018-05-15
    XII—Poetic Imagination.J. M. Cameron - 1962 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 62 (1):219-240.
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  13. added 2018-03-08
    The Dethroning of Ideocracy.Bence Nanay - 2014 - The Monist 97 (1):3-11.
  14. added 2018-01-10
    Paul Gauguin y Mario Vargas Llosa, entre el arte y la literatura. Manao Tupapau-El espíritu del muerto la recuerda, 1892.Carlos Vanegas - 2015 - Poliantea:227-251.
    Entre el arte y la literatura se han generado múltiples reflexiones que han sido estudiadas por la historia del arte, la teoría literaria y la estética, entre otros. Igualmente, podemos considerar una larga tradición de artistas y escritores que se han empeñado, por medio de ensayos, críticas y manifiestos, en considerar los ámbitos y lugares de competencia de cada forma artística, así como sus lugares de similitud y diferencia en una larga tradición de préstamos interartísticos entre la palabra y la (...)
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  15. added 2018-01-10
    Del Ser Nacional y Otras Ficciones. A Propósito de Efrén Giraldo, Negroides, Simuladores, Melancólicos. El Ser Nacional En El Ensayo Literario Colombiano Del Siglo XX. [REVIEW]Carlos Vanegas - 2013 - Co-herencia:257-261.
    Autores como Lukács o Adorno, por solo mencionar algunos nombres del siglo XX, han visto en el ensayo uno de los géneros literarios fundamentales para la expresión y exposición de ideas, con el bemol de que el ensayo siempre está en conflicto con otras plataformas de conocimiento, como las del orden establecido por la institución y la academia. Desde una postura compartida, el ensayista y crítico Efrén Giraldo se ha preocupado por la reinvindicación del ensayo literario, como una fuente de (...)
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  16. added 2017-11-03
    Imaginative Transportation.Samuel Kampa - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (4):683-696.
    Actors, undercover investigators, and readers of fiction sometimes report “losing themselves” in the characters they imitate or read about. They speak of “taking on” or “assuming” the beliefs, thoughts, and feelings of someone else. I offer an account of this strange but familiar phenomenon—what I call imaginative transportation.
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  17. added 2017-03-13
    Narrative Engagement with Atonement and The Blind Assasin.James Harold - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):130-145.
    Two recent novels, Ian McEwan’s Atonement and Margaret Atwood’s The Blind Assassin, are philosophically instructive. These books are interesting, I argue, because they reveal something about understanding and appreciating narrative. They show us that audience’s participation in narrative is much more subtle and complex than philosophers generally acknowledge. An analysis of these books reveals that narrative imagining is not static or unified, but dynamic and multipolar. I argue that once the complexity of narrative engagement is better understood, some prominent philosophical (...)
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  18. added 2016-09-19
    HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW]David Egan - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  19. added 2016-09-19
    Literature and Thought Experiments.David Egan - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):139-150.
    Like works of literature, thought experiments present fictional narratives that prompt reflection in their readers. Because of these and other similarities, a number of philosophers have argued for a strong analogy between works of literary fiction and thought experiments, some going so far as to say that works of literary fiction are a species of thought experiment. These arguments are often used in defending a cognitivist position with regard to literature: thought experiments produce knowledge, so works of literary fiction can (...)
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  20. added 2016-08-26
    Is Ethics Nonsense?: The Imagination, and the Spirit Against the Limit.Melvin Chen - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):172-187.
    The letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.In the exegetical tradition of Wittgenstein, there have existed three types of readings: the positivist reading, the ineffability reading, and the resolute reading. In this essay, I will be adhering to the resolute reading, whose roots may be traced to James Conant and Cora Diamond. However, the positivist reading of Wittgenstein having been historically prior and still in currency, it bears first examining the features of this approach.2Two readings may be regarded as paradigmatic (...)
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  21. added 2016-03-21
    Morality by Words: Murdoch, Nussbaum, Rorty.Tracy Llanera - 2014 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 18 (1):1-17.
    Despite the initial strangeness of grouping Iris Murdoch (a Platonist), Martha Nussbaum (an Aristotelian), and Richard Rorty (a pragmatist) together, this paper will argue that these thinkers share a strong commitment to the moral purport of literature. I will also show that their shared idea of moral engagement through literature interlocks the individual’s sense of self and the world of others. After considering their accounts, I will conclude by raising the question of literature’s moral limits.
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  22. added 2016-02-28
    On the Sociological Imagination.Danielle Allen - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (2):340-341.
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  23. added 2016-01-04
    Cognition and Literary Ethical Criticism.Gilbert Plumer - 2011 - In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & Community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation. pp. 1-9.
    “Ethical criticism” is an approach to literary studies that holds that reading certain carefully selected novels can make us ethically better people, e.g., by stimulating our sympathetic imagination (Nussbaum). I try to show that this nonargumentative approach cheapens the persuasive force of novels and that its inherent bias and censorship undercuts what is perhaps the principal value and defense of the novel—that reading novels can be critical to one’s learning how to think.
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  24. added 2015-11-18
    The Words and Worlds of Literary Narrative: The Trade-Off Between Verbal Presence and Direct Presence in the Activity of Reading.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2013 - In Lars Bernaerts, Dirk De Geest, Luc Herman & Bart Vervaeck (eds.), Stories and Minds: Cognitive Approaches to Literary Narrative. University of Nebraska Press. pp. 191-231.
    This paper disputes the notion, endorsed by much of narrative theory, that the reading of literary narrative is functionally analogous to an act of communication, where communication stands for the transfer of thought and conceptual information. The paper offers a basic typology of the sensorimotor effects of reading, which fall outside such a narrowly communication-based model of literary narrative. A main typological distinction is drawn between those sensorimotor effects pertaining to the narrative qua verbal utterance (verbal presence) and those sensorimotor (...)
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  25. added 2015-08-25
    Immanent Transcendence in Rilke and Stevens.Jennifer Gosetti-Ferencei - 2010 - The German Quarterly 83 (3):275-296.
    The present study of the philosophical orientation within the poetics of Rilke and Stevens aims to show that in the context of modern poetry, transcendence, or “crossing beyond,” must be understood in two distinct senses, as vertical and horizontal projections. The usurpation of one by the other or the transfer between them distinguishes the poetry of Rilke and Stevens and makes a comparative reading particularly illuminating. The fact that Rilke and Stevens are two of the most widely invoked poets in (...)
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  26. added 2015-08-25
    Poetiche E Genealogie Claudel, Val'ery, Nietzsche.Filippo Fimiani (ed.) - 2000 - Liguori.
    What is at stake in this counterintuitive reappraisal of such different authors as Claudel, Valéry and Nietzsche is not a poietics of artistic techniques and processes but their style of sensorial and sensitive subjectivation as such. The aim is not a comparative philosophy of art but a genealogy of aesthetic experience. The three authors here considered differ widely in terms of their worldviews and cultural backgrounds. However, they share a similar radical critical view of the Modern and its idols—the cartesian (...)
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  27. added 2015-07-27
    Re-Imagining US Literature and the Left.Daniel Aaron’S. - 2003 - Historical Materialism 11 (4):395-404.
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  28. added 2015-07-27
    Literature, Philosophy, and the Imagination. [REVIEW]B. A. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):583-583.
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  29. added 2015-04-25
    The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance.Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. pp. 233-246.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. Our (...)
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  30. added 2015-04-13
    Sartre.Robert Hopkins - forthcoming - In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge. pp. 82-93.
    In The Imaginary Sartre offers a systematic, insightful and heterodox account of imagining in many forms. Beginning with four ‘characteristics’ he takes to capture the phenomenology of imagining, he draws on considerations both philosophical and psychological to describe the deeper nature of the state that has those features. The result is a view that remains the most potent challenge to the Humean orthodoxy that to this day dominates both philosophical and psychological thinking on the topic.
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  31. added 2015-03-25
    Isabelle Eberhardt.Raymond Aaron Younis - 1995 - In Scott Murray (ed.), Australian film 1978-1994. Oxford University Press.
  32. added 2015-03-20
    Written Among the Living.Raymond Aaron Younis - 1997 - Westerly 42 (3):101-112.
  33. added 2015-02-26
    Nationhood and Decolonization (The English Patient).Raymond Aaron Younis - 1998 - Literature/Film Quarterly 26 (1).
  34. added 2015-02-26
    Apropos the Last 'Post-'.Raymond Aaron Younis - 1996 - Literature and Theology 10 (3):280-291.
  35. added 2015-02-26
    Religion Literature and the Arts.Raymond Aaron Younis, Michael Griffith, James Tulip, Ross Keating & Elaine Lindsay (eds.) - 1996 - Sydney: RLA.
  36. added 2015-01-28
    Kierkegaard's Concepts: Psychological Experiment.Martijn Boven - 2015 - In Jon Stewart, Steven M. Emmanuel & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome V. Kierkegaard's Concepts: Objectivity to Sacrifice. Ashgate. pp. 159-165.
    For Kierkegaard the ‘psychological experiment’ is a literary strategy. It enables him to dramatize an existential conflict in an experimental mode. Kierkegaard’s aim is to study the source of movement that animates the existing individual (this is the psychological part). However, he is not interested in the representation of historical individuals in actual situations, but in the construction of fictional characters that are placed in hypothetical situations; this allows him to set the categories in motion “in order to observe completely (...)
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  37. added 2014-12-22
    Lakonik und Suada in der Prosa Thomas Bernhards.Andreas Dorschel - 2007/08 - Thomas Bernhard Jahrbuch:215-233.
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  38. added 2014-06-01
    Kierkegaard's Concepts: Incognito.Martijn Boven - 2014 - In Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate. pp. 231-236.
    The Danish word 'incognito' means to appear in disguise, or to act under an unfamiliar, assumed name (or title) in order to avoid identification. As a concept, incognito occurs in several of Kierkegaard’s works, but only becomes a subject of reflection in two: the Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments by Johannes Climacus and Practice in Christianity by Anti-Climacus. Both pseudonyms develop the concept from their own perspective and must be understood on their own terms. Johannes Climacus treats incognito as (...)
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  39. added 2014-04-23
    The Imagination in the Travel Literature of Xavier de Maistre and its Philosophical Significance.Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2014 - In Garth Lean, Russell Staif & Emma Waterton (eds.), Travel and Imagination. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 75-88.
    In this chapter, I present some philosophical reflections on the theme of the imagination. The main inspiration for these reflections comes from two writers, both of whom are mentioned in Alain de Botton’s (2003) The Art of Travel: Joris-Karl Huysmans and Xavier de Maistre. De Botton uses both of these writers in his book as ‘guides’, people whose work prompts his own ruminations, Huysmans in the first chapter and de Maistre in the last. Speculatively, I infer from this structure that (...)
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  40. added 2014-04-02
    Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance.Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
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  41. added 2014-04-02
    Literature, Imagination, and Human Rights.Willie van Peer - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):276-291.
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  42. added 2014-03-30
    The Imagination as Unifying Principle in the Works of Blake and Wordsworth.J. A. Lambo - 1993 - Diogenes 41 (164):59-72.
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  43. added 2014-03-28
    The Problem of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabó Gendler & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In John Gibson & Noël Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge. pp. 405-418.
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  44. added 2014-03-19
    Knowledge and Imagination in Fiction and Autobiography.Ole Martin Skilleas - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (2):259-276.
    Autobiographies are particularly interesting in the context of moral philosophy because they offer us rare and extended examples of how other people think, feel and reflect, which is of crucial importance in the development of phronesis (practical wisdom). In this article, Martha Nussbaum's use of fictional literature is shown to be of limited interest, and her arguments in Poetic Justice against the use of personal narratives in moral philosophy are shown to be unfounded. An analysis of Aristotle's concept of mimesis (...)
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  45. added 2014-03-17
    Part 3. The Narrative Imaginary. Double Trouble: Narrative Imagination as a Carnival Dragon.David Wood - 2007 - In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.
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  46. added 2014-01-19
    Outer Vs. Inner Reverberations: Verbal Auditory Imagery and Meaning-Making in Literary Narrative.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2013 - Journal of Literary Theory 7 (1-2):111-134.
    It is generally acknowledged that verbal auditory imagery, the reader's sense of hearing the words on a page, matters in the silent reading of poetry. Verbal auditory imagery (VAI) in the silent reading of narrative prose, on the other hand, is mostly neglected by literary and other theorists. This is a first attempt to provide a systematic theoretical account of the felt qualities and underlying cognitive mechanics of narrative VAI, drawing on convergent evidence from the experimental cognitive sciences, psycholinguistic theory, (...)
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  47. added 2013-12-20
    Fiction as a Genre.Stacie Friend - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179--209.
    Standard theories define fiction in terms of an invited response of imagining or make-believe. I argue that these theories are not only subject to numerous counterexamples, they also fail to explain why classification matters to our understanding and evaluation of works of fiction as well as non-fiction. I propose instead that we construe fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a cluster of nonessential criteria, and which play a role in the appreciation of particular works. I (...)
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  48. added 2013-12-20
    Fictive Utterance and Imagining II.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere (Friend 2008) that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an (...)
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  49. added 2013-12-20
    Imagining Fact and Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2008 - In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 150-169.
  50. added 2013-09-16
    The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination.Dominic Griffiths - 2015 - In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate. pp. 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
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