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1 — 50 / 107
  1. added 2020-08-09
    The Tragic Imagination: The Literary Agenda.Rowan Williams - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This short but thought-provoking volume asks the question 'What is it that tragedy makes us know?'. The focus is on tragedy as a mode of representing the experience of radical suffering, pain, or loss, a mode of narrative through which we come to know certain things about ourselves and our world--about its fragility and ours. Through a mixture of historical discussion and close reading of a number of dramatic texts--from Sophocles to Sarah Kane--the book addresses a wide range of debates: (...)
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  2. added 2020-08-09
    Restrained Excess: Where Sophistication Meets the Grotesque.Rune Graulund - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):338-355.
    Readily conjured images of “grotesque” behavior—such as, say, vomiting on one’s plate during dinner or fornicating in public—are hard to envisage as acts of “sophistication.” In fact it seems that the grotesque constitutes the exact opposite of sophistication. For whereas the grotesque is loud and insistent, “characteristically [evoking] a sudden shock,” sophistication is characterized by that which is subdued and refined.1 Unlike the grotesque, which is to some extent defined by spectacle, sophistication is at its finest when it remains unnoticed. (...)
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  3. added 2020-08-09
    Noble Savages and English Gardeners: Kulturkritik From Rousseau to Goethe.Franz R. Kempf - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):422-442.
    “The human being embodies a tension between a nature which has since been lost and an unreachable Divine Creator,” writes Rudolf Borchardt in his book The Passionate Gardener. And he continues: “The garden stands at precisely the center of this tension and displaces itself, in accord with its fluctuations in the epoch and the individual, toward one or the other: toward nature or creativity. This is the deepest reason for which the human being dreams that our origins lie in a (...)
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  4. added 2020-08-09
    Imagining Uncertainty: Charles Olson and Karl Popper.Mark Byers - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):443-458.
    In his preface to The Poverty of Historicism, Karl Popper graciously notified his readers of a major shortcoming in his study, first published in three parts in Economica in 1944 and 1945. Though he had “tried to show” in these papers that “historicism is a poor method,” they did not “actually refute historicism.”1 That is, though he had revealed historicism to be founded on “common misunderstandings of the methods of physics”, he had not logically refuted its two principal assumptions: that (...)
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  5. added 2020-08-09
    Imagine This ….Bruce Sheridan - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1A):A279-A292.
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  6. added 2020-08-09
    Interior Portraits in The Magic Mountain and Brain Imaging.Amihud Gilead - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):416-432.
  7. added 2020-08-04
    Review of Poetry and the Religious Imagination: The Power of the Word. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (7):571-2.
    This review shows how during COVID 19, poetry and theology both can soothe us. The collection of essays in this anthology is wide ranging engaging with Dante; right up to Wallace Stevens and Denise Levertov. The reviewer thanks the Ramakrishna Mission for providing him with a hard copy of this book. In passing; in the spirit of IndianLivesMatter, one notes that Prabuddha Bharata has never missed an issue from 1896 till date. In his long stint as reviewer for the Ramakrishna (...)
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  8. added 2020-08-04
    On Alan Goldman's Philosophy and the Novel.Richard Eldridge - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):564-571.
    It is worth at least a moment to note and praise Alan Goldman’s methodological stance in Philosophy and the Novel.1 Goldman reflects appreciatively on the achievements of specific novels in order to arrive at philosophically interesting results about interpretation and moral understanding. In his appreciative reflections, Goldman is aware of, but by no means bound by, recent work in experimental moral psychology and metaethics. The result is a powerful demonstration not only of the human, cognitive, and ethical interest of the (...)
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  9. added 2020-08-04
    Flaubert and Kafka: Studies in Psychopoetic StructureKafka's Narrators: A Study of His Stories and Sketches.Larysa Mykyta, Charles Bernheimer & Roy Pascal - 1987 - Substance 16 (1):90.
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  10. added 2020-08-04
    History, Fiction, and Legend in Nerval's Angelique.Phyllis Zuckerman - 1978 - Substance 6 (20):79.
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  11. added 2020-08-04
    Maurice Blanchot, romancierMaurice Blanchot: La Voix Narrative.Steven Ungar, Evelyne Londyn & Daniel Wilhem - 1977 - Substance 6 (17):167.
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  12. added 2020-08-04
    Rom in the Literature.Albert W. Vogel - 1976 - Educational Studies 7 (4):359-367.
  13. added 2020-08-04
    Siren-Language: Kafka and Blanchot.Walter A. Strauss - 1976 - Substance 5 (14):18.
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  14. added 2020-07-28
    Forgetful Remembrance: Social Forgetting and Vernacular Historiography of a Rebellion in Ulster. By Guy Beiner. Pp. Xviii, 670, London, Oxford University Press, 2018, £31.50. [REVIEW]James Hanvey - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):202-203.
  15. added 2020-07-28
    Text in a Box.Herman Rapaport, Renee & Judd - 1997 - Substance 26 (1):56.
  16. added 2020-07-28
    The Narrative Act: Point of View in Prose Fiction.Gary Lee Stonum & Susan Sniader Lanser - 1982 - Substance 11 (3):87.
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  17. added 2020-07-24
    How Literature Expands Your Imagination.Antonia Peacocke - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
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  18. added 2020-07-24
    Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, Pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011.A. E. Denham, A. E. Denham & A. Denham - 2020 - In Denham, A. (2020). Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011. Cambridge, UK: pp. 190-210.
    The nature and consequences of readers’ affective engagement with literature has, in recent years, captured the attention of experimental psychologists and philosophers alike. Psychological studies have focused principally on the causal mechanisms explaining our affective interactions with fictions, prescinding from questions concerning their rational justifiability. Transportation Theory, for instance, has sought to map out the mechanisms the reader tracks the narrative experientially, mirroring its descriptions through first-personal perceptual imaginings, affective and motor responses and even evaluative beliefs. Analytical philosophers, by contrast, (...)
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  19. added 2020-07-24
    Genocide, Memory, and the Difficulties of Forgiveness in Card’s Ender Saga and Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant.Elizabeth Burow-Flak - 2019 - Renascence 71 (4):247-267.
    Orson Scott Card’s Ender Saga and Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant explore the role of memory in aftermath of genocide; both authors employ fantasy and the metaphor of the buried giant to represent past slaughters. Although distinct in genre, the novels together demonstrate the tension between forgiving and forgetting in memory studies following the atrocities of the twentieth century. Forgiveness in the Ender saga falls short of the accountability embedded in “difficult forgiveness” as defined by Paul Ricoeur, as does the (...)
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  20. added 2020-07-13
    JK Rowling est-il plus diabolique que Me? (révisé en 2019).Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - In Bienvenue en Enfer sur Terre : Bébés, Changement climatique, Bitcoin, Cartels, Chine, Démocratie, Diversité, Dysgénique, Égalité, Pirates informatiques, Droits de l'homme, Islam, Libéralisme, Prospérité, Le Web, Chaos, Famine, Maladie, Violence, Intellige. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 247-250.
    Que diriez-vous d’une autre prise sur les riches et célèbres? Tout d’abord l’évidence - les romans de Harry Potter sont la superstition primitive qui encourage les enfants à croire en la fantaisie plutôt que d’assumer la responsabilité du monde - la norme bien sûr. JKR est tout aussi désemparé sur elle-même et le monde que la plupart des gens, mais environ200 fois plus destructeur que l’Américain moyen et environ 800 fois plus que le Chinois moyen. Elle a été responsable de (...)
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  21. added 2020-07-13
    Sobre una posible influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2020 - Ciudad de México, CDMX, México: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México / Itaca.
    A lo largo de este libro se ofrece una interpretación novedosa y sugerente del pensamiento de David Hume y del Quijote, leído y citado por aquél, siendo una obra muy influyente en la Inglaterra de su tiempo. El autor pretende mostrar que la influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume es posible, probable y plausible, para lo cual ofrece diversos argumentos. Desarrolla su interpretación mostrando que un fragmento extraído del Quijote es indispensable para la postulación del criterio del gusto (...)
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  22. added 2020-07-08
    Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary.Stuart Kendall & Leslie Hill - 2000 - Substance 29 (3):134.
  23. added 2020-07-08
    Blanchot: Extreme Contemporary.Steven Jaron & Leslie Hill - 1999 - Substance 28 (1):120.
  24. added 2020-07-02
    Leavis on Tragedy.Paul Dean - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):189-205.
    Returning from the Great War to Cambridge in 1919, F. R. Leavis switched from studying history to studying English. It’s not hard to see why. The academic study of history must have seemed monstrously unreal to him after what he had been through, and the fledgling English School offered, as he later said, “a creative response to change—change in society and civilization that had been made unignorable by the war,”1 in contrast to the Oxford course, which reflected “the habit instilled (...)
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  25. added 2020-07-02
    The Myth of Narcissus as a Surreptitious Allegory About Creativity.Greg Stone - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):273-284.
    Perhaps no myth is more misunderstood than the story of Narcissus, who is erroneously thought to be self-absorbed, egotistical, and vain. Adding to the confusion, a growth industry on narcissism has emerged in academic circles. case in point: Professor Daniel Ames of columbia business School devised a brief personality test with sixteen binary choices such as “I am going to be a great person” or “I hope I am going to be successful.”1 One student did so “well” that he boasted (...)
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  26. added 2020-07-01
    Sculpting Ideas: Can Philosophy Be an Art Form?St Hope Earl McKenzie - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):34-43.
    The question of the possibility of philosophy being an art form concludes Robert Nozick’s Philosophical Explanations.1 He seems to be of the view that an affirmative answer would augur well for further inquiry into the kinds of core philosophical questions, those that “make us tremble,” he writes, which he has just examined: the identity of the self; why is there something rather than nothing; knowledge and skepticism; free will; the foundation of ethics; and the meaning of life.2 These explorations aim (...)
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  27. added 2020-07-01
    The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and Philosophy.Anthony J. Cascardi - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Literature and philosophy have long shared an interest in questions of truth, value, and form. And yet, from ancient times to the present, they have often sharply diverged, both in their approach to these questions and in their relationship to one another. Moreover, the vast differences among individual writers, historical periods, and languages pose challenges for anyone wishing to understand the relationship between them. This Introduction provides a synthetic and original guide to this vast terrain. It uncovers the deep interests (...)
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  28. added 2020-07-01
    Chivalric Fiction and the History of the NovelCaroline A. Jewers.Sarah Kay - 2003 - Speculum 78 (3):911-912.
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  29. added 2020-06-24
    “The Inwardness of the Modern Mind”.Elif Çirakman - 2010 - Cultura 7 (1):70-85.
    The aim of this article is to investigate the ways in which memory and imagination operate in and through the development of consciousness in literary texts. Itsguiding theme shall be the double consciousness in modern life which sets the plot for one of the masterpieces of Henry James, The Ambassadors. Thus The Ambassadors artfully crafts the “inwardness of the modern mind” by plotting it as a process of maturity and of becoming mindful through the powers of imagination, recollection and memory. (...)
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  30. added 2020-05-19
    Narrative Variation and the Mood of Freedom in Fear and Trembling.Alexander Jech - forthcoming - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook.
    One of the most distinctive features of Fear and Trembling is Kierkegaard’s use of narrative variations in order to isolate, develop, and highlight the relevant features of his principal theme, the story of Abraham and Isaac, especially Abraham’s final test of faith. The book begins with a preface and ends with an epilogue; immediately within these, Kierkegaard has his pseudonym, Johannes de Silentio, provide such variations in the “Attunement” or Stemning, just following the Preface, and in Problema III, just before (...)
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  31. added 2020-05-05
    Empathy in Literature.Eileen John - 2017 - In Heidi L. Maibom (ed.), Routledge Handbook to Philosophy of Empathy. London: Routledge. pp. 306-16.
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  32. added 2020-04-27
    Virtue Ethics and Literary Imagination.Jay R. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):244-256.
    Did Plato see something that Aristotle missed? According to a familiar narrative, Plato regarded literature as dangerous to the aims of philosophy, and he accordingly exiled the poets from his ideal republic. By contrast, Aristotle is supposed to have reconciled literature and philosophy, not only through his appreciative account of epic and tragedy in the Poetics but also through his invocations of literary examples at crucial junctures elsewhere in his corpus, for example his use of the Trojan legend of Priam (...)
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  33. added 2020-04-27
    Imagining Death: The Ways of Milton.Arnold Stein - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 30 (2):77.
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  34. added 2020-03-14
    The Poetic Apriori: Philosophical Imagination in a Meaningful Universe.Raymond Barfield - 2020 - Stuttgart, Germany: ibidem/Columbia University Press.
    Theories about the nature and function of philosophical imagination depend on our understanding of what kind of universe we inhabit. Some theories are compelling if the universe is meaningful as a whole, but they make no sense if it is not. Raymond C. Barfield discusses conditions that would be necessary if the universe is meaningful as a whole, and then develops a theory of philosophical imagination in light of that starting place. The theory moves toward the conclusion that if the (...)
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  35. added 2020-02-07
    Fictive Utterance And Imagining II.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an adequate criterion (...)
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  36. added 2020-01-20
    What Does Philosophy Contribute to the Study of the Mind?Susanna Siegel - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 88:52-63.
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  37. added 2020-01-13
    Tales of Dread.Mark Windsor - 2019 - Estetika 56 (1):65-86.
    ‘Tales of dread’ is a genre that has received scant attention in aesthetics. In this paper, I aim to elaborate an account of tales of dread which effectively distinguishes these from horror stories, and helps explain the close affinity between the two, accommodating borderline cases. I briefly consider two existing accounts of the genre – namely, those of Noël Carroll and of Cynthia Freeland – and show why they are inadequate for my purposes. I then develop my own account of (...)
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  38. added 2020-01-13
    Consciousness: A Story.Robert Allan Richardson - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):394-402.
    Consciousness is known by the company it keeps. Story is its constant companion. This is the case even when it addresses itself to itself and says what it sees. It is like the pilot of a ship in one tale, but a thinking "I" in another. It is a theater where perceptions come and go, or an aviary where thoughts fly in and out like birds, or a stream. It is the manifestation of an immortal soul, or perhaps the first (...)
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  39. added 2020-01-12
    The Libertine Reader: Eroticism and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century France.Michel Feher (ed.) - 1997 - New York: Zone Books.
    Irresistibly charming or shamelessly deceitful, remarkably persuasive or uselessly verbose, everything one loves to hate — or hates to love — about “French lovers” and their self-styled reputation can be traced to eighteenth-century libertine novels. Obsessed with strategies of seduction, endlessly speculating about the motives and goals of lovers, the idle aristocrats who populate these novels are exclusively preoccupied with their erotic lives. Deprived of other battlefields in which to fulfill their thirst for glory, libertine noblemen seek to conquer the (...)
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  40. added 2020-01-07
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  41. added 2020-01-07
    Omnicide: Mania, Fatality, and Future-in-Delirium (Review). [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (4):3-6.
    Omnicide: Mania, Fatality and Future-in-Delirium (2019) finds Iranian-American philosopher and comparative literature theorist Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh carving the figure of the diffracted neo-Bedouin wanderer, whose mania we tail through the book’s haunted pages. The book’s namesake, “omnicide,” refers to the complete and total erasure of the Earth--the term has most recently been generally applied in ecological contexts, most markedly in regards to the Anthropocene and futurology. However, it is the explicitly poetic and literary intersection between mania and the grotesque that (...)
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  42. added 2019-09-14
    Mary Shelley’s ‘Romantic Spinozism’.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (8):1125-1142.
    ABSTRACT Mary Shelley (1797–1851) developed a ‘Romantic Spinozism’ from 1817 to 1848. This was a deterministic worldview that adopted an ethical attitude of love toward the world as it is, must be, and will be. Resisting the psychological despair and political inertia of fatalism, her ‘Romantic Spinozism’ affirmed the forward-looking responsibility of people to love their neighbors and sustain the world, including future generations, even in the face of seeming apocalypse. This history of Shelley’s reception of Spinoza begins with the (...)
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  43. added 2019-08-24
    Imagining in Response to Fiction: Unpacking the Infrastructure.Alon Chasid - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 23 (1):31-48.
    Works of fiction are alleged to differ from works of nonfiction in instructing their audience to imagine their content. Indeed, works of fiction have been defined in terms of this feature: they are works that mandate us to imagine their content. This paper examines this definition of works of fiction, focusing on the nature of the activity that ensues in response to reading or watching fiction. Investigating how imaginings function in other contexts, I show, first, that they presuppose a cognitive (...)
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  44. added 2019-08-06
    The Life of Imagination: Revealing and Making the World.Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    Imagination allows us to step out of the ordinary but also to transform it through our sense of wonder and play, artistic inspiration and innovation, or the eureka moment of a scientific breakthrough. In this book, Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei offers a groundbreaking new understanding of its place in everyday experience as well as the heights of creative achievement. -/- The Life of Imagination delivers a new conception of imagination that places it at the heart of our engagement with the world—thinking, (...)
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  45. added 2019-07-05
    Символіка образу пса у прозі Сергія Жадана.Snizhana Umanets - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:110-113.
  46. added 2019-06-06
    The Dethroning of Ideocracy: Robert Musil as a Philosopher.Bence Nanay - 2014 - The Monist 97 (1):3-11.
    Paper on Robert Musil's philosophical system.
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Ovid's Lovers. Desire, Difference, and the Poetic Imagination. [REVIEW]Sharon James - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):402-404.
  48. added 2019-06-06
    On the Sociological Imagination.Danielle Allen - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (2):340.
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  49. added 2019-06-06
    The Use of Imagination, Emotion, and the Will in a Medieval Classic.Lawrence F. Hundersmarck - 2003 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 6 (2):46-62.
  50. added 2019-05-09
    T. Breyfogle : Literary Imagination, Ancient and Modern. Essays in Honor of David Grene. Pp. 405, Maps. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1999. Paper, £13.50. ISBN: 0-226-07425-0. [REVIEW]Roland Mayer - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):676-676.
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