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  1. Traditional Literary Interpretation Versus Subversive Interpretation.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I present some objections to traditional literary interpretation and consider subversive interpretation as a solution to these problems. Subversive interpretation may seem more scientific and more democratic than traditional interpretation, but it is open to doubt that it is more democratic.
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  2. Banishing The Poets.: Yun Lee Too, The Idea of Ancient Literary Criticism. [REVIEW]Charles Martindale - unknown - Arion 8 (3).
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  3. Fictional Truth: In Defence of the Reality Principle.Nils Franzén - forthcoming - In Emar Maier & Andreas Stokke (eds.), The Language of Fiction. Oxford University Press.
    A well-known theory about under which circumstances a statement is true in a fiction is The Reality Principle, which originate in the work of David Lewis: (RP) Where p1... pn are the primary fictional truths of a fiction F , it is true in F that q iff the following holds: were p1 ... pn the case, q would have been the case (Walton 1990: 44). RP has been subjected to a number of counterexamples, up to a point where, in (...)
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  4. Wittgenstein's Enigmatic Remarks on Shakespeare.Wolfgang Andreas Huemer - forthcoming - In Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Shakespeare and Philosophy. London, New York: Routledge.
  5. The Logic of Exemplarity.Jakub Mácha - forthcoming - Law and Literature (online first):1-15.
    The topic of exemplarity has attracted considerable interest in philosophy, legal theory, literary studies and art recently. There is broad consensus that exemplary cases mediate between singular instances and general concepts or norms. The aim of this article is to provide an additional perspective on the logic of exemplarity. First, inspired by Jacques Derrida’s discussion of exemplarity, I shall argue that there is a kind of différance between (singular) examples and (general) exemplars. What an example exemplifies, the exemplarity of the (...)
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  6. Narrative, Emotion, and Insight.John Gibson Noel Carroll (ed.) - forthcoming - PSUP.
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  7. Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  8. Exploding Stories and the Limits of Fiction.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (3):675-692.
    It is widely agreed that fiction is necessarily incomplete, but some recent work postulates the existence of universal fictions—stories according to which everything is true. Building such a story is supposedly straightforward: authors can either assert that everything is true in their story, define a complement function that does the assertoric work for them, or, most compellingly, write a story combining a contradiction with the principle of explosion. The case for universal fictions thus turns on the intuitive priority we assign (...)
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  9. A Philosophical Approach to Satire and Humour in Social Context.Daniel Abrahams - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Glasgow
    The topic of my dissertation is satire. This seems to excite many people, and over the past four years I have heard many variations of a similar refrain: “Oh, wow. You’re studying satire? That’s very topical. You must have a lot of material to work with.” There is a way in which this is true, though I suspect in a way that diverges from the way that most of my interlocutors believed. I suspect that the material they imagined me to (...)
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  10. A sereia e o desavisado: Ideologia Francesa, crítica dialética e a “matéria brasileira”.Raphael F. Alvarenga - 2020 - Sinal de Menos 14:228-62.
    Since the 1980s, there have been many attempts to bring together Critical Theory of Frankfurtian strain and French theories generally referred to as poststructuralist. The present text seeks to readdress the problem of their tricky articulation by taking a look at some vicissitudes those two currents of thought underwent in Brazil. In addition to the risk – embedded in the Parisian passion for dissolution – of positivizing atrocious aspects of Brazilian society related to the country’s multi-secular informality and backwardness, what (...)
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  11. André Breton and Three Surrealist Poets.Willard Bohn - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):310-322.
  12. Arguments From Aesthetic Merit to Fictional Content.Adrian Bruhns, Tobias Klauk & Tilmann Köppe - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (2):209-218.
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  13. Naming the Lyric: Literature Versus Philosophy in Plato's Symposium.Katherine Elkins - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):402-417.
  14. Reason as the Death of Fathers: Plato's Sophist and the Ghost's Command in Hamlet.Erich Freiberger - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):272-297.
  15. Primo Levi e Pierre Bayle. "Soffro dunque sono": una lettura dei moderni.Simone Ghelli - 2020 - In Gianluca Cinelli & Robert S. C. Gordon (eds.), Innesti: Primo Levi e i libri altrui. Oxford: Peter Lang. pp. 161-177.
    (Dall'introduzione del volume) Nel terzo capitolo Simone Ghelli si lancia nell’impresa di ipotizzare un percorso di lettura leviano di cui non è dato trovare riscontri filologici precisi, ma che è tuttavia percepibile “nell’aria” e nelle opere del torinese. Si tratta di una risonanza con il pensiero filosofico di Pierre Bayle e della sua riflessione sulla sofferenza nell’orizzonte speculativo di Levi, il quale tornò sovente a meditare sul problema del male e sulla spinosa questione dell’assenza di Dio e dell’impossibilità di fornire (...)
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  16. The Causes of Action in Oedipus Tyrannus.Roy Glassberg - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):184-187.
    Why do things happen as they do in the universe of Oedipus Tyrannus, consisting of the play itself coupled with the myth that surrounds and informs it? Why is Oedipus fated to kill his father and marry his mother? What part does Oedipus play in his own destruction? What role do divinities play? And what of human free will? In what follows I consider the power of curses, prophecy, prayer, fate, the gods, and human self-determination as they serve to effect (...)
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  17. On Theory-Centrism: The "Literary Theory" Void of Literature.Zhang Jiang - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):88-104.
    From the end of the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century, the development of Western literary theory witnessed three important stages: from "author oriented," to "text oriented," and then to "reader oriented." Each of these three historical stages generated several important theories and schools, each with its own advantages, with infiltration and cross-thematic debates from time to time. However, we can now form the judgment that, after one hundred years of development and evolution, the overall pattern of Western literary (...)
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  18. Estrangement, Epochē, and Performance: Bertolt Brecht’s Verfremdungseffek T and a Phenomenology of Spectatorship.Molly Kelly - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (4):419-431.
    During his period of exile in Scandinavia, Bertolt Brecht wrote “I don’t think the traditional form of theatre means anything any longer. Its significance is purely historic; it can illuminate the way in which earlier ages regarded human relationships […] [but] a modern spectator can’t learn anything from them”. To create a modern theatre fit for a modern audience, Brecht holds that not only would the content of plays have to change, but the experience of theatrical spectatorship itself. To fully (...)
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  19. In Praise of Depth: Or, How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Hidden.Joshua Landy - 2020 - New Literary History 1 (51):145-76.
    In recent years, some prominent scholars have been making a surprising claim: examining literary texts for hidden depths is overblown, misguided, or indeed downright dangerous. Such examination, they’ve warned us, may lead to the loss of world Heidegger warned of (Gumbrecht), to the world-denying metaphysics Nietzsche warned of (Nehamas), or to the suspicious form of hermeneutics Ricoeur warned of (Best, Marcus, Moi). This paper seeks to suggest that, though the concerns are understandable, there’s ultimately nothing to worry about. The fact (...)
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  20. Temporal Succession in Samson Agonistes.Ayelet C. Langer - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):298-309.
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  21. Jane Austen’s ‘Religious Principle’: Reflections on Re‐Reading Her Novel, Mansfield Park.Gordon Leah - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):459-470.
  22. Odysseás Elytis's Conversation with Heraclitus: "Of Ephesus".J. H. Lesher - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):226-236.
  23. Sartre's Nausea as Liar Paradox.Richard McDonough - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):461-475.
  24. Tzachi Zamir, "Just Literature: Philosophical Criticism and Justice.".Rafe McGregor - 2020 - Philosophy in Review 40 (4):179-181.
  25. Poetics of Resistance: Rankine's Don't Let Me Be Lonely as Phenomenological Lyric.Claire McQuerry - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):418-434.
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  26. Weird Fiction: A Catalyst for Wonder.Jan B. W. Pedersen - 2020 - Wonder, Education and Human Flourishing: Theoretical, Emperical and Practical Perspectives.
    One of the vexed questions in the philosophy of wonder and indeed education is how to ensure that the next generation harbours a sense of wonder. Wonder is important, we think, because it encour- ages inquiry and keeps us as Albert Einstein would argue from ‘being as good as dead’ or ‘snuffed-out candles’ (Einstein 1949, 5). But how is an educator to install, bring to life, or otherwise encourage a sense of wonder in his or her stu- dents? Biologist Rachel (...)
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  27. The Rules and Politics of Storyworlds: Fictionalizing the Everyday in E. F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia Novels.James Phillips - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):52-65.
    Astory is an instruction manual of sorts, containing rules for the manufacture of fictional objects. Consider the opening sentence from E. F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia: "Though it was nearly a year since her husband's death, Emmeline Lucas still wore the deepest and most uncompromising mourning."1 As the sentence does not describe someone who exists, it does not press a truth claim that could be substantiated by observing the person in question. Instead, it is an invitation to construction: the reader (...)
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  28. Literary Appreciation in the Framework of Positivism.Vincenz Pieper - 2020 - Journal of Literary Theory 1 (14):76-93.
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  29. Aesthetic Ineffability and the Rebirth of the Reader.Venkat Ramanan - 2020 - Aesthetics Research Lab 1.
    The ineffable experience in literature may be a product of both the author and the reader. There is similarly a need for a confluence between the artist and viewer in other art forms too for ineffability to arise.
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  30. Time and the Observer in Jorge Luis Borges.Venkat Ramanan - 2020 - Literature & Aesthetics 30 (1):209-227.
    Jorge Luis Borges displays an ambivalence in his writings towards the reality of time’s flow. On the one hand, he seems to accept arguments from various thinkers refuting the reality of time. “And yet, and yet…” Borges appears unable to feel completely reconciled to such a view of time. I argue that this is because a view that refutes time denies the observer too along with it. I conclude with demonstrating how Borges, by trying to identify a reconciliation between a (...)
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  31. Vasily Grossman, Graham Greene and the Nature of Doubt.Venkat Ramanan - 2020 - The Punch Magazine.
    What’s more important: having faith or being human? This essay examines this question by juxtaposing the work of the Russian writer Vasily Grossman against that of the English novelist Graham Greene.
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  32. The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy by Yi-Ping Ong.Corina Stan - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):199-206.
    Yi-Ping Ong's The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy is a highly innovative book. It teases out from essays by Søren Kierkegaard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir an existentialist poetics of the novel, which then inspires thoughtful readings of freedom and self-consciousness, situated worldhood, and unfinished works of art in nineteenth-century novels. At every step, Ong carefully articulates the insights that set her study apart from established ways of understanding the novel as form, the legacy (...)
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  33. Jeeves Resumes Charge.S. Subramanian - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):495-500.
    The following is a sequel to the narrative "Jeeves Takes Charge," first published in the Saturday Evening Post of November 1916, in which Lady Florence Craye is reported to have plans for getting Bertie Wooster to read Nietzsche. The threat, in the present account, is executed. While it is not clear if the provenance of this sequel can actually be traced back to P. G. Wodehouse, the submitter has expressed the strong belief that the piece stands an excellent chance of (...)
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  34. Sobre una posible influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2020 - Ciudad de México, CDMX, México: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México / Itaca.
    A lo largo de este libro se ofrece una interpretación novedosa y sugerente del pensamiento de David Hume y del Quijote, leído y citado por aquél, siendo una obra muy influyente en la Inglaterra de su tiempo. El autor pretende mostrar que la influencia del Quijote en el pensamiento de Hume es posible, probable y plausible, para lo cual ofrece diversos argumentos. Desarrolla su interpretación mostrando que un fragmento extraído del Quijote es indispensable para la postulación del criterio del gusto (...)
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  35. Freud on the Uncanny: A Tale of Two Theories.Mark Windsor - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):35-51.
    Since its publication nearly a century ago, Freud's essay on the uncanny has attracted much attention in the humanities, and has become a key point of reference for many discussions of literature and art.1 In spite of this, Freud's essay is often poorly understood. Freud's theory of the uncanny is typically referred to in the literature as the "return of the repressed." Indeed, at one point in the essay, Freud does define the uncanny as "something which is secretly familiar … (...)
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  36. The Incognito of a Thief: Johannes Climacus and the Poetics of Self-Incrimination.Martijn Boven - 2019 - In Adam Buben, Eleanor Helms & Patrick Stokes (eds.), The Kierkegaardian Mind. London, UK: pp. 409-420.
    In this essay, I advance a reading of Philosophical Crumbs or a Crumb of Philosophy, published by Søren Kierkegaard under the pseudonym Johannes Climacus. I argue that this book is animated by a poetics of self-incrimination. Climacus keeps accusing himself of having stolen his words from someone else. In this way, he deliberately adopts the identity of a thief as an incognito. To understand this poetics of self-incrimination, I analyze the hypothetical thought-project that Climacus develops in an attempt to show (...)
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  37. Wordsworth: Second Nature and Democracy.Mark S. Cladis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):89-106.
    What is the relation between democracy and second nature? What, that is, is the relation between a form of government that places a premium on a people shaping their shared destiny and a people who have been shaped by their past inheritance—an assortment of traditions, customs, perspectives, and practices? Does democracy fundamentally seek to escape custom and practice—the oppressive yoke of tradition—or does it, in fact, depend on a cultural inheritance, a second nature?In many standard accounts, Romanticism frees itself from (...)
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  38. "Chequer Works of Providence": Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe's Fiction.Bridget C. Donnelly - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):107-120.
    I mention this story also as the best method I can advise any person to take in such a case, especially if he be one that makes conscience of his duty, and would be directed what to do in it, namely, that he should keep his eye upon the particular providences which occur at that time, and look upon them complexly, as they regard one another, and as all together regard the question before him: and then, I think, he may (...)
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  39. Heidegger, Sartre, and Irresolute Dasein in Philip Roth’s The Dying Animal, Everyman, and “Novotny’s Pain”.James Duban - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):441-465.
    In an interview concerning his novel The Anatomy Lesson, Philip Roth remarked that narrator Nathan Zuckerman “has to be in a state of vivid transformation or radical displacement. ‘I am not what I am—I am, if anything, what I am not!’”1 The utterance has been traced to Jean-Paul Sartre’s encounter, in Being and Nothingness, with ecstatic relations. Sartre, anticipating Roth’s description of Zuckerman, similarly defines the ecstatic dimensions of consciousness that constitute Dasein. According to Sartre, consciousness must fulfill three requirements: (...)
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  40. Das Drama vom Menschen, der nicht Mensch sein durfte. Tätige Aufklärung in Lessings »Emilia Galotti«.Björn Freter - 2019 - Mitteilungen der Sokratischen Gesellschaft 58:68-78.
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  41. The Individual ‘We’ Narrator.Mattia Gallotti & Raphael Lyne - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):ayy051.
    The prevailing assumption in literary studies tends to be that a ‘we’ narrative voice is either that of an individual purporting to speak for a group, or that of a collective of people whose perspectives have coalesced into a unified one. Recent work on social agency across the cognitive humanities suggests another way of understanding what might be conveyed by such a ‘we’. Social cognition research shows that individuals can have their capacities changed and enhanced when they interact with others, (...)
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  42. Responding to E. R. Dodds.Roy Glassberg - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):248-252.
    At the beginning of his essay "On Misunderstanding the Oedipus Rex," E. R. Dodds tells us what prompted him to write it. As Regius Professor of Greek at the University of Oxford, he served as an examiner in the annual undergraduate honors trials, and as such posed the following question: "In what sense, if in any, does the Oedipus Rex attempt to justify the ways of God to man?"1 He divided the responses into three categories. The first of these, the (...)
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  43. EURIPIDES’ INFLUENCE ON RACINE - Alonge Racine et Euripide. La révolution trahie. Pp. 414. Geneva: Librairie Droz, 2017. Paper, €65.40. ISBN: 978-2-600-05797-4. [REVIEW]Richard E. Goodkin - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):37-39.
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  44. Despairing Macbeth: A Speech Out of Place.William Irwin - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):1-10.
    The prevailing tendency in interpreting Macbeth is to presume that if something seems not to fit the play, then our job as readers or audience members is to figure out how it actually does fit. By contrast, in this paper I take a less-deferential approach to interpretation, arguing that the famous speech in Macbeth, act 5, scene 5, was not written for the play in which it appears.2 Like the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's film Psycho, the "tomorrow" speech in (...)
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  45. Literary Intentionalism.Robbie Kubala - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (4):503-515.
    In the philosophical debate about literary interpretation, the actual intentionalist claims, and the anti-intentionalist denies, that an acceptable interpretation of fictional literature must be constrained by the author’s intentions. I argue that a close examination of the two most influential recent strands in this debate reveals a surprising convergence. Insofar as both sides (a) focus on literary works as they are, where work identity is determined in part by certain (successfully realized) categorial intentions concerning, e.g., title, genre, and large-scale instances (...)
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  46. Self-Forgiveness and the Moral Perspective of Humility: Ian McEwan's Atonement.John Lippitt - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):121-138.
    Is it possible to forgive oneself? If so, should the person who has done so, for a serious wrongdoing, be fully at peace with herself? Some philosophers, perhaps most famously Hannah Arendt, have denied the coherence of the very idea of self-forgiveness.1 Others, such as Charles Griswold, have recognized it as both coherent and important: a distinct phenomenon from accepting the forgiveness of others, and vital in circumstances where seeking such forgiveness is morally problematic. Yet Griswold still holds self-forgiveness to (...)
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  47. Politics, Religion, and Love'S Transgression: The Political Philosophy of Romeo and Juliet.Zdravko Planinc - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):11-37.
    In Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare examines the relationship of the political realm to the things that are outside or beyond politics: family, society, religion, friendship, and love. The play is thus a work of political philosophy, and no less so because it is a work of art in which these things are portrayed concretely through the relationships of the play's characters. The difficulties of interpreting the play are due in part to its aesthetic particularity, but more to the familiarity (...)
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  48. The Exile of Pessoa & Camus.Venkat Ramanan - 2019 - The Punch Magazine 1.
    Poet and philosopher Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935) described himself as someone who is an “exile from the country of which he had always considered himself a citizen…” Is it apposite to associate exile with someone who — apart from spending nine years in South Africa during his youth — essentially never stirred out of his native Portugal? This essay examines this question by comparing Pessoa to another famous exile, Albert Camus.
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  49. "Shining Lights, Even in Death": What Metal Gear Can Teach Us About Morality (Master's Thesis).Ryan Wasser - 2019 - Dissertation, West Chester University
    Morality has always been a pressing issue in video game scholarship, but became more contentious after “realistic” violence in games became possible. However, few studies concern themselves with how players experience moral dilemmas in games, choosing instead to focus on the way games affect postplay behavior. In my thesis I discuss the moral choices players encounter in the Metal Gear series of games; then, I analyze and compare the responses of players with and without martial career experiences. My argument is (...)
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  50. Who Do We Think We Are?Andrea C. Westlund - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):173-191.
    Our moral lives are replete with acts of autobiographical story-telling. The stories we tell are intended to help others understand what we do by helping them understand “who we are” in a practical or normative sense. The act of addressing one’s stories to an audience, however, is as likely to destabilize as it is to confirm one’s understanding of “who one is”. Drawing on themes in Wally Lamb’s novel I Know This Much is True, I offer a dialogical account of (...)
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