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  1. added 2020-05-31
    "Soffro dunque sono": Primo Levi lettore dei moderni.Simone Ghelli - 2020 - In Gianluca Cinelli & Robert S. C. Gordon (eds.), Innesti: Primo Levi e i libri altrui. Oxford: Peter Lang. pp. 161-177.
    (Dall'introduzione del volume) Nel terzo capitolo Simone Ghelli si lancia nell’impresa di ipotizzare un percorso di lettura leviano di cui non è dato trovare riscontri filologici precisi, ma che è tuttavia percepibile “nell’aria” e nelle opere del torinese. Si tratta di una risonanza con il pensiero filosofico di Pierre Bayle e della sua riflessione sulla sofferenza nell’orizzonte speculativo di Levi, il quale tornò sovente a meditare sul problema del male e sulla spinosa questione dell’assenza di Dio e dell’impossibilità di fornire (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-01
    Wittgenstein's Enigmatic Remarks on Shakespeare.Wolfgang Andreas Huemer - forthcoming - In Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Shakespeare and Philosophy. London, New York: Routledge.
  3. added 2020-05-01
    Dionysus in the Mirror: Hamlet as Nietzsche's Dionysian Man.Pyles Timothy - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):128-141.
    The play's the thing,"1 Hamlet says in act 2, scene 2 of Shakespeare's finest tragedy. Hamlet is referring here to the forthcoming performance of The Mousetrap, the play that he has asked the newly arrived players to perform that evening in the presence of his mother and uncle. "The play's the thing," Hamlet says, "Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King". But it is not confirmation of his uncle's guilt as the murderer of his father that Hamlet really needs (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-01
    What George Eliot of Middlemarch Could Have Taught Spinoza.Brian Fay - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):119-135.
    That George Eliot was deeply interested in Spinoza is well known. She translated part of Benedict de Spinoza's Tractatus Theologico-Politicus as early as 1842, and completed a full translation of the Ethics by 1856. This might lead one to think that in her novels, Eliot applied the insights of Spinoza by showing them at work in the lives of her characters. Indeed, a number of commentators have made this assumption in depicting the relationship between Eliot and Spinoza.1 Other commentators have (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-01
    Hushed Resolve, Reticence, and Rape In J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace.LeBlanc Mary - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):158-168.
    The most disturbing gift that Disgrace presents to its readers is the hushed resolve with which Lucy Lurie emerges from her rape to reaffirm her way of life. To consider that way of life, the reader is first invited to align oneself with David Lurie's initial normative reading of his daughter's rape; but then, in a second important step, to join in the change of mind by which David overcomes this initial blindness. Imagine what accepting the invitation to take both (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-01
    Levels of Literary Meaning.Søren Harnow Klausen - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):70-90.
    Intentionalism, it has been remarked, just won't go away.1 The idea that the meaning of a literary work is determined by the intentions of its author remains appealing and deeply entrenched in most people's thinking,2 in spite of ever-new waves of resistance. I do not wish to resume the discussion of the overall plausibility of intentionalism. Nor will I take a stand in the discussion of its different varieties, like actual versus hypothetical intentionalism.3 My interest lies in exploring the different (...)
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  7. added 2020-05-01
    Nothingness in Donne's "A Valediction: Of Weeping" and Shakespeare's Cymbeline.L. Estrin Barbara - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):60-75.
    "Nothingness lies coiled in the heart of being like a worm."The John Donne of "A Valediction: Of Weeping" prefers the picture to the real. For Donne and for Jean-Paul Sartre, with whom he is aligned in this essay, the preference principally involves issues of control. As Sartre writes, "It's not enough that a certain picture which I have in mind should exist; it is necessary as well that it exist through me."1 While the more conventional predilection for the virtual over (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-01
    Rethinking Shakespeare.E. Cain William - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):40-59.
    I am not certain that I know what I am trying to describe or how to identify it. It is something that happens or perhaps does not happen in Shakespeare's characters, something about how they think, in particular how they think or do not think at a critical moment of decision or change. I am referring to Shakespeare's policy and practice of conspicuous omission, calculated evasion, silent avoidance—to something that Shakespeare does not give us, a reticence or restraint about the (...)
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  9. added 2020-05-01
    Uses of Hamartia, Flaw, and Irony in Oedipus Tyrannus and King Lear.Roy Glassberg - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):201-206.
    Jules Brody argues that Aristotle's usage of hamartia in The Poetics is best understood in terms of its literal meaning, "missing the mark," rather than in the broader, familiar sense of "tragic flaw." Hamartia is a morally neutral non-normative term, derived from the verb hamartano, meaning "to miss the mark," "to fall short of an objective." And by extension: to reach one destination rather than the intended one; to make a mistake, not in the sense of a moral failure, but (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-01
    Engaging the World: Writing, Imagination, and Enactivism.Ian Ravenscroft - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):45-54.
    I have rewritten—often several times—every word I have ever published. My pencils outlast their erasers.A pen is a machine to think with.The writer engages the world not only by living in and reflecting it but also by two dynamic processes, one sensory/motor, the other social. The former involves cycles of writing, reading what has been written, responding to it, and writing again; the latter involves writing, reading to an audience, responding to their reactions, and writing again. Dynamic processes involving brain (...)
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  11. added 2020-05-01
    Tyranny and Blood: Rethinking Creon.Nancy J. Holland - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):1-11.
    This is certainly true for every translation, because every translation must necessarily accomplish the transition of the spirit of one language into that of another.We all know who and what Creon was. He was a tyrant—a proto-Nazi, according to French playwright Jean Anouilh. He was not even the same person in Sophocles's three Theban plays, according to translator H. D. F. Kitto.2 He was Antigone's uncle, her mother's brother. He was a symbol of the transition from a "rule of tradition" (...)
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  12. added 2020-05-01
    Love as Communication: A Short, Redacted Argument From the Phaedrus.Zhu Rui - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):230-231.
    οὕτω τὸ τοῦ κάλλους ῥεῦμα πάλιν εἰς τὸν καλὸν διὰ τῶν ὀμμάτων...
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  13. added 2020-05-01
    SWIRSKI, PETER. American Crime Fiction: A Cultural History of Nobrow Literature as Art. Palgrave MacMillan, 2016, Xiii + 222 Pp., 12 B&W Illus., $99.99 Cloth. [REVIEW]Iris Vidmar - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):318-321.
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  14. added 2020-05-01
    Gods and Children: Shakespeare Reads The Prince.Nowak Piotr - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):109-127.
    It is necessary for a prince to understand how to avail himself of the beast and the man.Having taken the Romagna in 1502, Cesare Borgia, the Italian nobleman and model for Machiavelli's political treatise The Prince, soon learned how unruly the newly acquired province was. Armed robbery, theft, impudent nepotism, imprecise law, and the racket made by the rebellious common people—all of this demanded the introduction of some kind of order. Messer Ramiro d'Orco, a thirtysomething, dynamic, decisive, resolute, and morally (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-01
    The Long Revenge of Zobel Blake.Glage A. Joachim - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):215-229.
    Pessimism distilled: Happiness is possible, but evil; unhappiness is likely, but futile.Very little is known of the bastard called Zobel Blake. We know he is the only person of record, bastard or otherwise, ever to be called by that name, and that his primary claim to historical significance lies in the fact that he was the very last man to languish to his death in an American debtors' prison. That such a distinction should befall an otherwise obscure man is not (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-01
    The Fire-Walking Antigone.W. Allen Timothy - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):12-23.
    Students in the humanities have found Antigone intriguing ever since she was cast as the focal character in Sophocles's much contemplated tragedy. Antigone is enigmatic, to be sure; until comparatively recently, most interpretations of her focused on her role in the context of the tragic series of events unfolding in the play. These accounts relied heavily on her portrayal by Hegel, as representing the prepolitical ties of kinship coming into conflict with the ascending authority of the state.Richer life was breathed (...)
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  17. added 2020-05-01
    The Postmodern Split: Poetry, Theory, and the Metaphysics That Would Not Die.Bruce Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):558-568.
    Postmodernism, in spite of its exaggerations and myopias, has left us with many gifts, including two strains of the critical tradition that struggle to reconcile with each other. Those strains grow from two undeniable truths: that the self can never occupy the space of the other, nor can the self extricate the other from its nature. Given the conflict between these truths, the postmodern resistance to metaphysics can never be quite as rigorous as it imagines, since the self, as inextricable (...)
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  18. added 2020-05-01
    Two-Part Invention: Voices From Augustine's The Teacher and Samuel Beckett's Endgame.Kidd Erika - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):480-494.
    We see our fathers naked, we men.Among the more poignant moments of Stanley Cavell’s 2010 autobiography Little Did I Know are those in which young Cavell works to find words to break the silence that hung between himself and his father. In one exchange, seven-year-old Cavell’s aimless remark about speckled chocolate wafers was met with a savage retort and marked the moment when Cavell became certain his father wanted him dead—or rather, not to exist at all. Cavell was tormented both (...)
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  19. added 2020-05-01
    Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach by Philip Kitcher.Iris Vidmar - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):320-324.
    From philosophy of science, epistemology, and ethics to political philosophy and philosophy of mathematics, Philip Kitcher has made outstanding contributions to every philosophical discipline. With Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach, he continues his journey into philosophy of literature he undertook back in 2007 with his book Joyce’s Kaleidoscope. Written in his clear, precise, and occasionally almost poetic style, Deaths in Venice is not only an inspiring new interpretation of Thomas Mann’s famous novel Death in Venice but (...)
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  20. added 2020-05-01
    Joseph Conrad and the Epistemology of Space.John G. Peters - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):98-123.
    Under the sumptuous immensity of the sky, the snow covered the endless forests, the frozen rivers, the plains of an immense country, obliterating the landmarks, the accidents of the ground, levelling everything under its uniform whiteness, like a monstrous blank page awaiting the record of an inconceivable history.Increased interest in the experience of space in literature in recent decades has resulted in numerous commentaries on such topics as colonial space, geographical space, gendered space, liminal space, psychic space, and signifying space. (...)
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  21. added 2020-05-01
    Lines to Time: A Poem by V. Penelope Pelizzon.M. W. Rowe - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):1-33.
    This essay explores a modern American poem—its verse form, imagery, diction, and rhythm, and, in particular, its cultural echoes, resonances, and overtones. I examine the poem’s explicit invocation of Apelles and crow mythology, but I also show that the implicit context from which it arises, and the one that allows it to speak with the great- est fullness and power, is work that Shakespeare wrote or published between 1606 and 1609. This context allows us to see that, at the heart (...)
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  22. added 2020-05-01
    The Cognitive Value of Philosophical Fiction by Jukka Mikkonen.László Kajtár - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):317-319.
    Many of us read works of fiction passionately not only because of their entertainment value or for their aesthetic inventiveness but also because we feel that they enrich our understanding of ourselves and the world. This is where there seems to be an important resemblance to philosophy. A number of fictional works can be legitimately called “philosophical” because they are thought provoking about issues that works of philosophy explicitly deal with. However, as the hot debate concerning truth through literature or (...)
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  23. added 2020-05-01
    Leavis, Tolstoy, Lawrence, and "Ultimate Questions".Edward Greenwood - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):157-170.
    Leavis’s turn from a preoccupation with poetry to a preoccupation with the novel in the second part of his career has long been recognized. There is a consensus that he had a wonderful feeling for the textual particularity of poetry, the way that a poem is not just its paraphrasable content, in that the meaning is carried by the movement, rhythm, tone, and tempo of the speaking voice. Poetry intended for the eye and print reading only passed him by. It (...)
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  24. added 2020-05-01
    Irony as a Way of Life: Svevo, Kierkegaard, and Psychoanalysis.Emma Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):431-445.
    “To create fiction is, in fact, a way to abolish reality.”1The main title of this article departs from a statement made by Andrew Cross in the chapter he wrote for The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard, “Neither Either nor Or: the Perils of Reflexive Irony,” which must surely suggest a tantalizing read for anyone familiar with the writings of Italo Svevo. In his chapter, Cross posits Søren Kierkegaard’s theorizing of irony as “not just a verbal strategy, but a way of life.”2 (...)
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  25. added 2020-05-01
    The Crisis of Subjectivity: The Significance of Darstellung and Freedom in E. T. A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman".Elizabeth Purcell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):44-58.
    In the latter part of the eigthteenth century, philosophers faced a problem with respect to moral freedom. They were concerned not only with an account of how one could be free in the Newtonian system of nature but also with how it might be possible to represent that freedom. The imagination provided an answer. The imagination, thought to have limitless potential through aesthetic experiences and judgments, provided the bridge between our abstract, intellectual understanding of the world and the conditions of (...)
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  26. added 2020-05-01
    Wittgenstein's Remarks on William Shakespeare.Derek McDougall - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):297-308.
    Wittgenstein as Shakespearean critic. Because Wittgenstein’s commentators agree that Shakespeare is the world’s greatest ever playwright, they have to account for those few remarks of his that may suggest a negative evaluation of Shakespeare as a poet. But these remarks can also be used to reveal that Shakespeare is a poet of a kind uniquely different to the majority of those whom Wittgenstein admired. This view is central to John Middleton Murry’s interpretation of Shakespeare and Keats. In a more positive (...)
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  27. added 2020-05-01
    Wittgenstein and Leavis: Literature and the Enactment of the Ethical.Danièle Moyal-Sharrock - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):240-264.
    Shakespeare displays the dance of human passions, one might say. … But he displays it to us in a dance, not naturalistically.In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein says that ethics cannot be put into words. This does not mean he thought ethics could not be made manifest; and indeed I will suggest that Wittgenstein took the best manifestation of ethics to be in aesthetics, and more specifically literature. Literature uses words in such a way as to allow ethics to show itself. It (...)
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  28. added 2020-05-01
    Genealogy of the Tragic: Greek Tragedy and German Philosophy.Joshua Billings - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
  29. added 2020-05-01
    Literature, Genre Fiction, and Standards of Criticism.James Harold - 2011 - Nonsite.Org 1 (4).
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  30. added 2020-05-01
    The Persistence of Allegory: Drama and Neoclassicism From Shakespeare to Wagner.Katie Terezakis - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):413-416.
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  31. added 2020-05-01
    Shakespeare's Philosophy: Discovering the Meaning Behind the Plays.Dale Jacquette - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):421-424.
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  32. added 2020-05-01
    The Mahābhārata. A Literary StudyThe Mahabharata. A Literary Study.Ludwik Sternbach & J. P. Sinha - 1981 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 101 (4):481.
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  33. added 2020-05-01
    The Unity of Existential Philosophy and Literature as Revealed by Shestov's Approach to Dostoevsky.David Patterson - 1979 - Studies in Soviet Thought 19 (3):219-231.
  34. added 2020-05-01
    Henry James and the Art of Literary Realism.D. D. Todd - 1976 - Philosophy and Literature 1 (1):79.
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  35. added 2020-04-27
    Is Clarissa Dalloway Special?R. Lanier Anderson - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):233-271.
    My title question has something of the feel of a book club discussion starter, but it has further-reaching implications for understanding Mrs. Dalloway than might first appear. Consider two more mainstream interpretive questions. First, Virginia Woolf's novel places extensive cognitive and aesthetic demands on its readers and thereby participates in the famous "difficulty" of much high-modernist literature. Any interpretation should explain why Woolf thought such a challenge to the capacities and expectations of the reader was necessary or conducive to her (...)
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  36. added 2020-04-27
    The Most Overrated Article of All Time?Joshua Landy - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):465-470.
    This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of an essay you have almost certainly read, if you took any class on literary theory in the intervening half-century. The essay in question is “The Death of the Author,” by a brilliant French thinker named Roland Barthes. Barthes had wonderfully illuminating things to say about the structure of narrative, realism, Proust, Racine, photography, and billboards. When he turned his thoughts to authorship, however, his touch temporarily deserted him, and the essay that resulted is (...)
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  37. added 2020-04-27
    Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):59-75.
    Herman Melville was so estranged from the religious beliefs of his time and place that his faith was doubted during his own lifetime. In the middle of the twentieth century some scholars even associated him with nihilism. To date, however, no one has offered a detailed account of Melville in relation to Nietzsche, who first made nihilism a topic of serious concern to the Western philosophical tradition. In this essay, I discuss some of the hitherto unexplored similarities between Melville’s ideas (...)
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  38. added 2020-04-27
    Rosalind Krauss, David Carrier, and Philosophical Art CriticismRosalind Krauss and American Philosophical Art Criticism: From Formalism to Beyond Postmodernism.Daniel A. Siedell & David Carrier - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (2):95.
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  39. added 2020-04-27
    The Spectator-Participant Distinction: An Impasse for Educational Literary Theory?R. A. Goodrich - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 29 (1):47.
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  40. added 2020-04-27
    Psychoanalysis and Literary ProcessGreat Expectations, Moby-DickThe Hieroglyphics of a New Speech, Cubism, Stieglitz, and the Early Poetry of William Carlos Williams.Van Meter Ames, Frederick Crews, James Joyce, Walter Pater & Bram Dijkstra - 1970 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (2):282.
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  41. added 2020-04-27
    A Study of Literature for Readers and CriticsSense and Sensibility in Modern Poetry.Richard Eberhart, David Daiches & William van O'Connor - 1950 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 8 (3):198.
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  42. added 2020-04-27
    Literary Criticism: Plato to DrydenLiterary Criticism: Pope to Croce.E. N. B., Allan H. Gilbert, Gay W. Allen & Harry H. Clark - 1942 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):75.
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  43. added 2020-04-24
    Exploding Stories and the Limits of Fiction.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-18.
    It is widely agreed that fiction is necessarily incomplete, but some recent work postulates the existence of universal fictions—stories according to which everything is true. Building such a story is supposedly straightforward: authors can either assert that everything is true in their story, define a complement function that does the assertoric work for them, or, most compellingly, write a story combining a contradiction with the principle of explosion. The case for universal fictions thus turns on the intuitive priority we assign (...)
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  44. added 2020-04-20
    In Praise of Depth: Or, How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Hidden.Joshua Landy - 2020 - New Literary History 1 (51):145-76.
    In recent years, some prominent scholars have been making a surprising claim: examining literary texts for hidden depths is overblown, misguided, or indeed downright dangerous. Such examination, they’ve warned us, may lead to the loss of world Heidegger warned of (Gumbrecht), to the world-denying metaphysics Nietzsche warned of (Nehamas), or to the suspicious form of hermeneutics Ricoeur warned of (Best, Marcus, Moi). This paper seeks to suggest that, though the concerns are understandable, there’s ultimately nothing to worry about. The fact (...)
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  45. added 2020-04-18
    ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  46. added 2020-04-16
    A Novel Solution to Academic Publishing.E. Garrett Ennis - manuscript
    Scientists have complained about the inconsistency and politics of academic publishing for hundreds of years. Among the explanations offered are that evaluators lack time and use shortcuts, that they lack the expertise to judge things properly, that they can't put aside personal biases and we must hide the names of authors, and that they are conscientious instead of creative and cannot judge new ideas. All of these are actually wrong. As a literary analyst, I spent the last ten years independently (...)
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  47. added 2020-03-26
    Inheriting the World.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2020 - Journal of Applied Logics 7 (2):163-70.
    A critical reflection on John Woods's new monograph, Truth in Fiction – Rethinking its Logic. I focus in particular on Woods’s world-inheritance thesis (what others have variously called ‘background,’ ‘the principle of minimal departure,’ and ‘the reality assumption,’ and which replaces Woods’s earlier ‘fill-conditions’) and its interplay with auctorial say-so, arguing that world-inheritance actually constrains auctorial say-so in ways Woods has not anticipated.
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  48. added 2020-02-12
    The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature.David Davies - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):89-91.
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  49. added 2020-01-13
    Tales of Dread.Mark Windsor - 2019 - Estetika 56 (1):65-86.
    ‘Tales of dread’ is a genre that has received scant attention in aesthetics. In this paper, I aim to elaborate an account of tales of dread which effectively distinguishes these from horror stories, and helps explain the close affinity between the two, accommodating borderline cases. I briefly consider two existing accounts of the genre – namely, those of Noël Carroll and of Cynthia Freeland – and show why they are inadequate for my purposes. I then develop my own account of (...)
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  50. added 2020-01-13
    Despairing Macbeth: A Speech Out of Place.William Irwin - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):1-10.
    The prevailing tendency in interpreting Macbeth is to presume that if something seems not to fit the play, then our job as readers or audience members is to figure out how it actually does fit. By contrast, in this paper I take a less-deferential approach to interpretation, arguing that the famous speech in Macbeth, act 5, scene 5, was not written for the play in which it appears.2 Like the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's film Psycho, the "tomorrow" speech in (...)
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