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  1. added 2020-05-01
    Hume, Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):91-102.
    The starting point of this paper is a recent exchange in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism1 that pits moderate moralism against robust immoralism and has Humean antecedents. I will proceed by agreeing in part with both, but fully with neither, thereby annoying as many people as possible in one go. I believe, with Anne Eaton, the proponent of robust immoralism, that fictions which valorize what she calls "rough heroes" can arouse both aesthetically compelling and morally troubling reactions. On (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-01
    Motherhood in Ferrante's The Lost Daughter: A Case Study of Irony as Extraordinary Reflection.Melissa Mcbay Merritt - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):185-200.
    In A Case for Irony, Jonathan Lear aims to advance “a distinguished philosophical tradition that conceives of humanity as a task” by returning this tradition to the ironic figure at its origin — Socrates. But he is hampered by his reliance on well-worn philosophical examples. I suggest that Elena Ferrante’s The Lost Daughter illustrates the mode of ironic experience that interests Lear, and helps us to think through his relation to Christine Korsgaard, arguably the greatest contemporary proponent of the philosophical (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-01
    The Lurking Class: From Parasocial Postal Clerks to Hypersocial Vloggers.Eric Bronson - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):16-30.
    Before becoming an internationally renowned sadhu espousing words of wisdom in an Indian forest, Sampath Chawla pulls down his pants. The wedding guests are horrified. His supervisor at the small-town post office fires him on the spot—it is, after all, his daughter's wedding.In Kiran Desai's novel Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard, the oafish Sampath probably shouldn't have been invited to the wedding in the first place. At the post office he has been sulking for some time. "The post office. The (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-01
    Jane Austen on Practical Wisdom, Constancy, and Unreserve.Christopher Toner - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):178-194.
    A central, if controversial, Aristotelian claim is that the virtues are connected—that practical wisdom depends upon moral virtue, and moral virtue upon practical wisdom. If those who see Jane Austen's portrayal of the moral life as broadly Aristotelian1 are right, we should expect to see such a dependence shown in Austen's novels. I will argue that we can indeed find portrayed a dependence of wisdom upon character, and in particular upon the virtues Austen calls constancy and unreserve. These two are (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-01
    Engaging the World: Writing, Imagination, and Enactivism.Ian Ravenscroft - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):45-54.
    I have rewritten—often several times—every word I have ever published. My pencils outlast their erasers.A pen is a machine to think with.The writer engages the world not only by living in and reflecting it but also by two dynamic processes, one sensory/motor, the other social. The former involves cycles of writing, reading what has been written, responding to it, and writing again; the latter involves writing, reading to an audience, responding to their reactions, and writing again. Dynamic processes involving brain (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-01
    Rafe McGregor, The Value of Literature.M. W. Rowe - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):127-137.
    A review of Rafe McGregor´s The Value of Literature.
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  7. added 2020-05-01
    MCGREGOR, RAFE. The Value of Literature. Rowman and Littlefield International, 2016, Xii + 161 Pp., $120.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Robbie Kubala - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):311-314.
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  8. added 2020-05-01
    Coherence, Literary and Epistemic.Charles Repp - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):59-71.
    Coherence is a term of art in both epistemology and literary criticism, and in both contexts judgments of coherence carry evaluative significance. However, whereas the epistemic use of the term picks out a property of belief sets, the literary use can pick out properties of various elements of a literary work, including its plot, characters, and style. For this reason, some have claimed that literary critics are not concerned with the same concept of coherence as epistemologists. In this article I (...)
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  9. added 2020-05-01
    Irony and Cognitive Empathy in Chrétien de Troyes's Gettier Problem.Brian J. Reilly - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):169-184.
    The relations of comparison and contrast among the viewpoints of characters and between the viewpoints of authors and characters is one of the most important dimensions of meaning in literary texts.... It is for this reason that the analysis of irony, as a central tonal medium for registering differences in point of view, occupies a position of singular importance in the interpretation of literary meaning.Irony stings. Among friends it might be playful, its target joining in the fun. But it is (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-01
    The Crisis of Subjectivity: The Significance of Darstellung and Freedom in E. T. A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman".Elizabeth Purcell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):44-58.
    In the latter part of the eigthteenth century, philosophers faced a problem with respect to moral freedom. They were concerned not only with an account of how one could be free in the Newtonian system of nature but also with how it might be possible to represent that freedom. The imagination provided an answer. The imagination, thought to have limitless potential through aesthetic experiences and judgments, provided the bridge between our abstract, intellectual understanding of the world and the conditions of (...)
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  11. added 2020-05-01
    What Does Literary Fiction Help Us Understand?'.Alexandre Leskanich - unknown
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  12. added 2020-05-01
    Irony as a Way of Life: Svevo, Kierkegaard, and Psychoanalysis.Emma Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):431-445.
    “To create fiction is, in fact, a way to abolish reality.”1The main title of this article departs from a statement made by Andrew Cross in the chapter he wrote for The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard, “Neither Either nor Or: the Perils of Reflexive Irony,” which must surely suggest a tantalizing read for anyone familiar with the writings of Italo Svevo. In his chapter, Cross posits Søren Kierkegaard’s theorizing of irony as “not just a verbal strategy, but a way of life.”2 (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-01
    The Cognitive Value of Philosophical Fiction by Jukka Mikkonen.László Kajtár - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):317-319.
    Many of us read works of fiction passionately not only because of their entertainment value or for their aesthetic inventiveness but also because we feel that they enrich our understanding of ourselves and the world. This is where there seems to be an important resemblance to philosophy. A number of fictional works can be legitimately called “philosophical” because they are thought provoking about issues that works of philosophy explicitly deal with. However, as the hot debate concerning truth through literature or (...)
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  14. added 2020-05-01
    "I Know Who I Am": Don Quixote, Self-Fashioning, and the Humanness of Ordinary Identity.Martinez Felicia - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):511-525.
    What does it mean to know who you are? Is it a matter of knowing your name? The things that you’ve done? The people you love? Such indispensible knowledge is somehow not enough; I can know all of these things, and still feel puzzled about who I am. “I am not the person I once was,” “I am not myself today,” and “I am learning who I am,” are all commonplace poems of a kind: expressive sentences completely at home both (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-01
    Refusing Disenchantment: Romanticism, Criticism, Philosophy.Stanley Bates - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):549-557.
    Aremarkable revival of interest in Romanticism has taken place among some philosophers in recent years. Why should this be so? Romanticism has had a bad reputation among literary critics of a variety of persuasions throughout most of the twentieth century, when it was not even a topic for analytical philosophy in the English-speaking world. The philosophical movement most associated with Romanticism—German idealism—had been shunned by the curricula of a majority of the most prestigious British and American universities by the mid-twentieth (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-01
    Narrative, Identity, and the Disunity of Life.Feuerhahn Niels - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):526-548.
    The notion that narratives play an important cognitive role in our ability to make sense of the world has become an intellectual commonplace. Peter Lamarque notes that “narratives are prominent in human lives, not only in the obvious places like literature, history and biography, but in virtually all forms of reflective cognition.”1 The argument that I present in this paper draws on a particular understanding of the significance of narrative for the constitution of selfhood. This understanding was first articulated by (...)
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  17. added 2020-05-01
    "Thick" Aesthetic Emotions and the Autonomy of Art.Mark Silcox - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):415-430.
    For the properly “cultivated,” proclaimed Oscar Wilde in 1890, “beautiful things mean only Beauty.”1 The idea that artworks possess a discrete and autonomous type of value, by virtue of their capacity to provoke a distinctively aesthetic type of response, is most often associated with artists and critics belonging to the modernist tradition of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Certainly, many influential writers of the period who expressed more instrumentalist attitudes toward the value of their own work, such as (...)
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  18. added 2020-05-01
    Trusting the Author: On Narrative Tension and the Puzzle of Audience Anxiety.W. Scott Clifton - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):325-346.
    In the opening episode of season four of the AMC network’s television show Breaking Bad, the attentive viewer reaches a point at which it’s difficult to see how the show’s heroes, Walter White and Jesse Pinkman, will escape death. The two are chemists and manufacturers of crystal methamphetamine for drug kingpin Gus Fring. At the end of the previous season they had picked up on Fring’s plans to kill them and replace them with another chemist, Gale Boetticher, who by then (...)
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  19. added 2020-05-01
    The Persistence of Allegory: Drama and Neoclassicism From Shakespeare to Wagner.Katie Terezakis - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):413-416.
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  20. added 2020-05-01
    Henry James and the Art of Literary Realism.D. D. Todd - 1976 - Philosophy and Literature 1 (1):79.
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  21. added 2020-04-27
    Kant on Poetry and Cognition.Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):1-17.
    Our engagements with poetry often leave us with a sense of having been not only aesthetically pleased and emotionally aroused but intellectually stimulated and cognitively rewarded.1 However, explicating the nature of such intellectual stimulus and accounting for poetry’s cognitive values are not easy tasks, given that poetry does not stand in the same relation to truth and knowledge as do science and philosophy. How then to account for the undeniable experience of having undergone a profound cognitive change after engaging with (...)
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  22. added 2020-04-27
    Virtue Ethics and Literary Imagination.Jay R. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):244-256.
    Did Plato see something that Aristotle missed? According to a familiar narrative, Plato regarded literature as dangerous to the aims of philosophy, and he accordingly exiled the poets from his ideal republic. By contrast, Aristotle is supposed to have reconciled literature and philosophy, not only through his appreciative account of epic and tragedy in the Poetics but also through his invocations of literary examples at crucial junctures elsewhere in his corpus, for example his use of the Trojan legend of Priam (...)
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  23. added 2020-04-27
    The Value of Literature. [REVIEW]Britt Harrison - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):332-336.
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  24. added 2020-04-27
    Narrative Rhyme and the Good Life.John E. MacKinnon - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):1-29.
    "Quite otherwise than the scientist, and far more than the historian," writes R. G. Collingwood, "the philosopher must go to school with the poets in order to learn the use of language, and must use it in their way: as a means of exploring one's own mind, and bringing to light what is obscure and doubtful in it." Whereas the poet "yields himself to every suggestion that his language makes," however, the philosopher's words are assembled "only to reveal the thought (...)
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  25. added 2020-04-27
    Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):59-75.
    Herman Melville was so estranged from the religious beliefs of his time and place that his faith was doubted during his own lifetime. In the middle of the twentieth century some scholars even associated him with nihilism. To date, however, no one has offered a detailed account of Melville in relation to Nietzsche, who first made nihilism a topic of serious concern to the Western philosophical tradition. In this essay, I discuss some of the hitherto unexplored similarities between Melville’s ideas (...)
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  26. added 2020-04-27
    The Abyss of Freedom: Love and Legitimacy in Constant’s Adolphe.Joshua Landy - 2009 - Nineteenth Century French Studies 3 (37):193-213.
    Despite its superficial similarities with Rousseau's Confessions, Constant's Adolphe functions in fact as a devastating critique from within of the entire autobiographical project. Proceeding from the threefold assumption that the soul is irremediably divided, self-opaque, and untranslatable into language, it interrogates the very feasibility of autobiography, implicitly presenting its protagonist's maxims (which only appear to be the fruits of experience altruistically shared) and his claim never to have loved (which only appears to be brutally honest, but is a curious act (...)
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  27. added 2020-04-27
    Moonstruck, or How to Ruin Everything.William Day - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):292-307.
    A reading of the film Moonstruck (1987) is presented in two movements. The first aligns Moonstruck with certain Hollywood film comedies of the 1930s and 40s, those Stanley Cavell calls comedies of remarriage. The second turns to some aspects of Emerson's writing – in particular his interest in our relation to human greatness, and his coinciding interest in our relation to the words of a text – and shows how Moonstruck inherits these Emersonian, essentially philosophical interests.
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  28. added 2020-04-27
    The Politics of Interpretation: Ideology, Professionalism, and the Study of LiteratureLeft Politics and the Literary Profession.Michael Fischer, Patrick Colm Hogan, Lennard J. Davis & M. Bella Mirabella - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (2):157.
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  29. added 2020-04-20
    To Thine Own Selves Be True-Ish: Shakespeare’s Hamlet as Formal Model.Joshua Landy - 2018 - In Tzachi Zamir (ed.), Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: pp. 154-87.
    This chapter presents the core challenge before Hamlet as that of achieving authenticity in the face of inner multiplicity. Authenticity—which this chapter will take to mean (1) acting on the (2) knowledge of (3) what one truly is, beneath one’s various masks and social roles—becomes a particularly pressing need under conditions of (early) modernity, when traditional forms of action-guidance are at least halfway off the table. But authenticity is highly problematic when the self that is discovered turns out to be (...)
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  30. added 2020-04-18
    How to Do Things with Fictions.Joshua Landy - 2012 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    How to Do Things with Fictions considers how fictional works, ranging from Chaucer to Beckett, subject readers to a series of exercises meant to fortify their mental capacities. While it is often assumed that fictions must be informative or morally improving in order to be of any real benefit to us, certain texts defy this assumption by functioning as training-grounds for the capacities: in engaging with them we stand not to become more knowledgeable or more virtuous but more skilled, whether (...)
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  31. added 2020-04-18
    Passion, Counter-Passion, Catharsis : Beckett and Flaubert on Feeling Nothing.Joshua Landy - 2010 - In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This chapter presents Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary and Samuel Beckett’s Trilogy as modern fictions with ancient-skeptical ambitions. Whether in the affective domain (Flaubert) or in the cognitive (Beckett), the aim is to help the reader achieve a position of studied neutrality—ataraxia, époché—thanks not to an a priori decision but to the mutual cancellation of opposing tendencies. Understanding Flaubert and Beckett in this way allows us, first, to enrich our sense of what “catharsis” may involve; second, to see why the apparently (...)
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  32. added 2020-04-18
    Corruption by Literature.Joshua Landy - 2010 - Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2 (1).
    This essay argues not just that literature can corrupt its readers—if literature can improve, it can also corrupt—but that some of that is our fault: by telling people to extract moral lessons from fictions, we’ve set them up to be led astray by writers like Ayn Rand. A global attitude of message-mining sets readers up to be misled, confused, or complacent (because they “gave at the office”), as well as to reject some excellent books. Ironically, the best way to make (...)
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  33. added 2020-04-18
    ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  34. added 2020-01-13
    Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts by Patrick Colm Hogan.Radhika Koul - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):467-470.
    The classic questions of philosophical aesthetics—how and why human beings find certain works of art beautiful or sublime—suffered from something of a hiatus in the twentieth century, but the study of beauty has seen a return in recent years, often calling on rapidly evolving research in cognitive science and neuroscience for assistance. Patrick Colm Hogan's Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts is an important contribution to the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of cognitive aesthetics. The book makes (...)
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  35. added 2020-01-13
    When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
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  36. added 2020-01-07
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  37. added 2020-01-05
    Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  38. added 2020-01-05
    Normative Fiction‐Making and the World of the Fiction.Manuel García‐Carpintero - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (3):267-279.
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  39. added 2020-01-05
    The "Analytic"/"Continental" Divide and the Question of Philosophy's Relation to Literature.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):253-269.
    The history of the writing of philosophy could be seen as divided between two tendencies. One tendency involves a constant reconfiguration of the literary and stylistic elements involved in the way philosophy is written. Examples include most texts in the philosophical canon, from Plato's dialogues, or Aristotle's lecture notes, to Marcus Aurelius's diary, Augustine's confessions, the pseudepigrapha of the Areopagite, Anselm's prayer, Montaigne's essays, Descartes's meditations, Kierkegaard's play with pseudonymy, or Wittgenstein's "remarks."1 In such texts, we find a self-reflective attitude (...)
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  40. added 2020-01-05
    The Philosophy of Decadence.Nicholas D. More - 2019 - In Jane Desmarais & David Weir (ed.), Cambridge Critical Concepts: Decadence and Literature. Cambridge, UK: pp. 184-199.
    The chapter outlines Nietzsche's view of decadence, its history and effects. The philosopher held decadence to be any condition, deceptively thought good, which limits what something or someone can be. This concept informs his critical and affirmative projects, acting as a versatile tool to identify and overcome his own decadence and to resist the decadence of Western culture. Decadence appears in five major areas of concern to Nietzsche: physiology; psychology; art and artists; politics; and philosophy. Physical and mental phenomena provide (...)
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  41. added 2020-01-05
    The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature by Peter Kivy. [REVIEW]Inês Morais - 2017 - Forma de Vida 84.
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  42. added 2019-11-10
    Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
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  43. added 2019-11-10
    The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
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  44. added 2019-08-02
    The Rhyme That Remains: Populist Poetics.Virgil W. Brower - 2012 - Everyday Genius 6 (21):61-81.
  45. added 2019-07-28
    H.P. Lovecraft’s Philosophy of Science Fiction Horror.Greg Littmann - 2018 - Science Fictions Popular Cultures Academics Conference Proceedings:60-75.
    The paper is an examination and critique of the philosophy of science fiction horror of seminal American horror, science fiction and fantasy writer H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). Lovecraft never directly offers a philosophy of science fiction horror. However, at different points in his essays and letters, he addresses genres he labels “interplanetary fiction”, “horror”, “supernatural horror”, and “weird fiction”, the last being a broad heading covering both supernatural fiction and science fiction. Taken together, a philosophy of science fiction horror emerges. Central (...)
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  46. added 2019-07-05
    Класики і романтики: спроба саморецензії.Borys Shalaginov - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:126-134.
    У статті підсумовано основні результати багаторічного дослідження «веймарської класики» і раннього німецького романтизму, розкрито суть «модерністичного проекту», спрямованого на інтелектуально-культурне оновлення всього європейського суспільства. Розглянуто три світоглядні «кризи модерну». Перша – на зламі XVIII–ХІХ ст. Романтики тоді розділили мистецтво естетично і соціологічно на масове і високе, а історично – на сучасний і «класичний» мейнстріми. Простежено подальшу долю «проекту» в умовах другої кризи доби Модерн на зламі ХІХ–ХХ ст. (тут естафету романтиків підхопив Ф. Ніцше) і уже в наш час – останньої (...)
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  47. added 2018-08-04
    Adam Bede’s Dutch Realism and the Novelist’s Point of View.Rebecca Gould - 2012 - Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):404-423.
    Hegel was ambivalent about Dutch genre painting’s uncanny ability to find beauty in daily life. The philosopher regarded the Dutch painterly aesthetic as Romanticism avant la lettre, and classifies it as such in his Lectures on Aesthetics, under the section entitled “Die romantischen Künste [The Romantic arts].”1 Dutch art, in Hegel’s reading, is marred by many shortcomings. The most prominent among these are the “subjective stubbornness [subjective Beschlossenheit]” that prevents this art from attaining to the “free and ideal forms of (...)
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  48. added 2018-03-27
    Leo Tolstoy’s tragic death and his impacts on Max Weber and György Lukács: On autonomy of arts and science/ O tema da morte trágica de Liev Tolstói e set impacto em Max Weber e György Lukács: Sobre a autonomia nas ciências e na arte.Luis F. Roselino - 2014 - Revista História E Cultura 3 (1):150-171.
    The tragic death in Tolstoy's writings has helped both Max Weber and György Lukács in characterizing the modern pathos as a tragic contemplation of the emptiness of life. Through Tolstoy's readings, Weber and Lukács found an interesting source of denying arts and modern sciences autonomy, considering, from the aesthetics sphere, the meaningless of this new immanent reality. Both has assumed Tolstoy main theme from the same perspective, contrasting ancient and modern worldviews. Max Weber presented this theme in his disenchantment of (...)
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  49. added 2018-02-16
    Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence.Susan Schneider (ed.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including _The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, The Time Machine,_ and (...)
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  50. added 2018-02-16
    Truth-Claiming in Fiction: Towards a Poetics of Literary Assertion.Jukka Mikkonen - 2009 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 20 (38):34.
    In the contemporary analytic philosophy of literature and especially literary theory, the paradigmatic way of understanding the beliefs and attitudes expressed in works of literary narrative fiction is to attribute them to an implied author, an entity which the literary critic Wayne C. Booth introduced in his influential study The Rhetoric of Fiction. Roughly put, the implied author is an entity between the actual author and the narrator whose beliefs and attitudes cannot be appropriately ascribed to the actual author. Over (...)
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