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  1. Jeremiah Reedy in Love with Logos, Essays on Greek Philosophy.M. Katsimitsis - unknown - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 13.
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  2. Banishing The Poets.: Yun Lee Too, The Idea of Ancient Literary Criticism. [REVIEW]Charles Martindale - unknown - Arion 8 (3).
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  3. Is There Such A Thing As Quixotic Virtue?Vicky Roupa - forthcoming - In Garry L. Hagberg (ed.), Fictional Worlds and the Moral Imagination. London:
    Quixote is a caricature of a knight errant; steeped into his fictional heroes, he undertakes to revive a tradition long dead, and in the process leaves behind some unforgettable images of knightly virtue turned sour. This caricature, however, is not simply a ploy meant to arouse laughter, but also an occasion to revisit the emphasis on knowledge and good sense with which virtue has been aligned in the Socratic/Platonic tradition. The challenge Quixote represents concerns the relation between reasoning and the (...)
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  4. Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, Pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011.A. E. Denham, A. E. Denham & A. Denham - 2020 - In Denham, A. (2020). Making Sorrow Sweet: Emotion and Empathy in the Experience of Fiction. In A. Houen (Ed.), Affect and Literature (Cambridge Critical Concepts, pp. 190-210). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781108339339.011. Cambridge, UK: pp. 190-210.
    The nature and consequences of readers’ affective engagement with literature has, in recent years, captured the attention of experimental psychologists and philosophers alike. Psychological studies have focused principally on the causal mechanisms explaining our affective interactions with fictions, prescinding from questions concerning their rational justifiability. Transportation Theory, for instance, has sought to map out the mechanisms the reader tracks the narrative experientially, mirroring its descriptions through first-personal perceptual imaginings, affective and motor responses and even evaluative beliefs. Analytical philosophers, by contrast, (...)
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  5. Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
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  6. Normative Fiction‐Making and the World of the Fiction.Manuel García-Carpintero - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (3):267-279.
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  7. The Philosophy of Decadence.Nicholas D. More - 2019 - In Jane Desmarais & David Weir (ed.), Cambridge Critical Concepts: Decadence and Literature. Cambridge, UK: pp. 184-199.
    The chapter outlines Nietzsche's view of decadence, its history and effects. The philosopher held decadence to be any condition, deceptively thought good, which limits what something or someone can be. This concept informs his critical and affirmative projects, acting as a versatile tool to identify and overcome his own decadence and to resist the decadence of Western culture. Decadence appears in five major areas of concern to Nietzsche: physiology; psychology; art and artists; politics; and philosophy. Physical and mental phenomena provide (...)
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  8. Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  9. Narrative Rhyme and the Good Life.John E. MacKinnon - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):1-29.
    "Quite otherwise than the scientist, and far more than the historian," writes R. G. Collingwood, "the philosopher must go to school with the poets in order to learn the use of language, and must use it in their way: as a means of exploring one's own mind, and bringing to light what is obscure and doubtful in it." Whereas the poet "yields himself to every suggestion that his language makes," however, the philosopher's words are assembled "only to reveal the thought (...)
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  10. Virtue Ethics and Literary Imagination.Jay R. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):244-256.
    Did Plato see something that Aristotle missed? According to a familiar narrative, Plato regarded literature as dangerous to the aims of philosophy, and he accordingly exiled the poets from his ideal republic. By contrast, Aristotle is supposed to have reconciled literature and philosophy, not only through his appreciative account of epic and tragedy in the Poetics but also through his invocations of literary examples at crucial junctures elsewhere in his corpus, for example his use of the Trojan legend of Priam (...)
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  11. When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
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  12. The Value of Literature. [REVIEW]Britt Harrison - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (3):332-336.
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  13. Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts by Patrick Colm Hogan.Radhika Koul - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):467-470.
    The classic questions of philosophical aesthetics—how and why human beings find certain works of art beautiful or sublime—suffered from something of a hiatus in the twentieth century, but the study of beauty has seen a return in recent years, often calling on rapidly evolving research in cognitive science and neuroscience for assistance. Patrick Colm Hogan's Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts is an important contribution to the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of cognitive aesthetics. The book makes (...)
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  14. To Thine Own Selves Be True-Ish: Shakespeare’s Hamlet as Formal Model.Joshua Landy - 2018 - In Tzachi Zamir (ed.), Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: pp. 154-87.
    This chapter presents the core challenge before Hamlet as that of achieving authenticity in the face of inner multiplicity. Authenticity—which this chapter will take to mean (1) acting on the (2) knowledge of (3) what one truly is, beneath one’s various masks and social roles—becomes a particularly pressing need under conditions of (early) modernity, when traditional forms of action-guidance are at least halfway off the table. But authenticity is highly problematic when the self that is discovered turns out to be (...)
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  15. Класики і романтики: спроба саморецензії.Borys Shalaginov - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:126-134.
    У статті підсумовано основні результати багаторічного дослідження «веймарської класики» і раннього німецького романтизму, розкрито суть «модерністичного проекту», спрямованого на інтелектуально-культурне оновлення всього європейського суспільства. Розглянуто три світоглядні «кризи модерну». Перша – на зламі XVIII–ХІХ ст. Романтики тоді розділили мистецтво естетично і соціологічно на масове і високе, а історично – на сучасний і «класичний» мейнстріми. Простежено подальшу долю «проекту» в умовах другої кризи доби Модерн на зламі ХІХ–ХХ ст. (тут естафету романтиків підхопив Ф. Ніцше) і уже в наш час – останньої (...)
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  16. Hume, Halos, and Rough Heroes: Moral and Aesthetic Defects in Works of Fiction.E. M. Dadlez - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):91-102.
    The starting point of this paper is a recent exchange in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism1 that pits moderate moralism against robust immoralism and has Humean antecedents. I will proceed by agreeing in part with both, but fully with neither, thereby annoying as many people as possible in one go. I believe, with Anne Eaton, the proponent of robust immoralism, that fictions which valorize what she calls "rough heroes" can arouse both aesthetically compelling and morally troubling reactions. On (...)
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  17. La filosofia della letteratura: un pregiudizio a favore della finzione.Wolfgang Andreas Huemer - 2017 - In Guido Ferraro & Antonio Santangelo (eds.), Finzione e realtà. Il senso degli eventi. Roma: Aracne. pp. 137-54.
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  18. MCGREGOR, RAFE. The Value of Literature. Rowman and Littlefield International, 2016, Xii + 161 Pp., $120.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Robbie Kubala - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):311-314.
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  19. How Can Each Word Be Irreplaceable?: Is Coleridge's Claim Absurd?Paul Magee - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):400-415.
    One often hears a version of the following: “A poem is never finished, just abandoned.” I have always found this proposition irksome. The fact that Paul Valéry seems to be the source of it, in something like the above form, makes me feel a certain trepidation in writing this. But I do find myself thinking, when I hear people say that their poems are never finished, only abandoned: why don’t you just finish them? I want a poem to be finished. (...)
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  20. Motherhood in Ferrante's The Lost Daughter: A Case Study of Irony as Extraordinary Reflection.Melissa Mcbay Merritt - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):185-200.
    In A Case for Irony, Jonathan Lear aims to advance “a distinguished philosophical tradition that conceives of humanity as a task” by returning this tradition to the ironic figure at its origin — Socrates. But he is hampered by his reliance on well-worn philosophical examples. I suggest that Elena Ferrante’s The Lost Daughter illustrates the mode of ironic experience that interests Lear, and helps us to think through his relation to Christine Korsgaard, arguably the greatest contemporary proponent of the philosophical (...)
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  21. Prologues and the Idols of Criticism: Borges on Ficciones.Nicholas D. More - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):272-287.
    Scholars still struggle to characterize, evaluate, and understand the mesmerizing prose pieces of Ficciones that raised Jorge Luis Borges to the first ranks of literary fame. Speaking to Philosophy and Literature, Borges once described his work as "the fiction of philosophy," and the two prologues he wrote for Ficciones leave enticing clues about what this means in practice. I argue that these long-neglected prologues open critical space for Ficciones, slyly mocking three idols of literary cant: that genre informs a work, (...)
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  22. Engaging the World: Writing, Imagination, and Enactivism.Ian Ravenscroft - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):45-54.
    I have rewritten—often several times—every word I have ever published. My pencils outlast their erasers.A pen is a machine to think with.The writer engages the world not only by living in and reflecting it but also by two dynamic processes, one sensory/motor, the other social. The former involves cycles of writing, reading what has been written, responding to it, and writing again; the latter involves writing, reading to an audience, responding to their reactions, and writing again. Dynamic processes involving brain (...)
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  23. Irony and Cognitive Empathy in Chrétien de Troyes's Gettier Problem.Brian J. Reilly - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):169-184.
    The relations of comparison and contrast among the viewpoints of characters and between the viewpoints of authors and characters is one of the most important dimensions of meaning in literary texts.... It is for this reason that the analysis of irony, as a central tonal medium for registering differences in point of view, occupies a position of singular importance in the interpretation of literary meaning.Irony stings. Among friends it might be playful, its target joining in the fun. But it is (...)
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  24. Coherence, Literary and Epistemic.Charles Repp - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):59-71.
    Coherence is a term of art in both epistemology and literary criticism, and in both contexts judgments of coherence carry evaluative significance. However, whereas the epistemic use of the term picks out a property of belief sets, the literary use can pick out properties of various elements of a literary work, including its plot, characters, and style. For this reason, some have claimed that literary critics are not concerned with the same concept of coherence as epistemologists. In this article I (...)
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  25. The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
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  26. Rafe McGregor, The Value of Literature.M. W. Rowe - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):127-137.
    A review of Rafe McGregor´s The Value of Literature.
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  27. Jane Austen on Practical Wisdom, Constancy, and Unreserve.Christopher Toner - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1A):178-194.
    A central, if controversial, Aristotelian claim is that the virtues are connected—that practical wisdom depends upon moral virtue, and moral virtue upon practical wisdom. If those who see Jane Austen's portrayal of the moral life as broadly Aristotelian1 are right, we should expect to see such a dependence shown in Austen's novels. I will argue that we can indeed find portrayed a dependence of wisdom upon character, and in particular upon the virtues Austen calls constancy and unreserve. These two are (...)
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  28. Refusing Disenchantment: Romanticism, Criticism, Philosophy.Stanley Bates - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):549-557.
    Aremarkable revival of interest in Romanticism has taken place among some philosophers in recent years. Why should this be so? Romanticism has had a bad reputation among literary critics of a variety of persuasions throughout most of the twentieth century, when it was not even a topic for analytical philosophy in the English-speaking world. The philosophical movement most associated with Romanticism—German idealism—had been shunned by the curricula of a majority of the most prestigious British and American universities by the mid-twentieth (...)
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  29. Creativity and Pedagogy in Leavis.Michael Bell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):171-188.
    I never heard or met F. R. Leavis personally, but like many others I have felt the impact of his writing as teaching and would like to reflect on its nature in that regard. His published criticism is strongly inflected toward the purposes of teaching. His notorious exclusions, for example, of authors he knew very well are partly directed to the practical consideration of how much a conscientious student can read attentively in a three-year degree syllabus, and what reading in (...)
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  30. Irony as a Way of Life: Svevo, Kierkegaard, and Psychoanalysis.Emma Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):431-445.
    “To create fiction is, in fact, a way to abolish reality.”1The main title of this article departs from a statement made by Andrew Cross in the chapter he wrote for The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard, “Neither Either nor Or: the Perils of Reflexive Irony,” which must surely suggest a tantalizing read for anyone familiar with the writings of Italo Svevo. In his chapter, Cross posits Søren Kierkegaard’s theorizing of irony as “not just a verbal strategy, but a way of life.”2 (...)
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  31. Trusting the Author: On Narrative Tension and the Puzzle of Audience Anxiety.W. Scott Clifton - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):325-346.
    In the opening episode of season four of the AMC network’s television show Breaking Bad, the attentive viewer reaches a point at which it’s difficult to see how the show’s heroes, Walter White and Jesse Pinkman, will escape death. The two are chemists and manufacturers of crystal methamphetamine for drug kingpin Gus Fring. At the end of the previous season they had picked up on Fring’s plans to kill them and replace them with another chemist, Gale Boetticher, who by then (...)
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  32. WAXLER, ROBERT P. The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, Vii + 191 Pp., $77.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):310-311.
  33. Leavis on Tragedy.Paul Dean - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):189-205.
    Returning from the Great War to Cambridge in 1919, F. R. Leavis switched from studying history to studying English. It’s not hard to see why. The academic study of history must have seemed monstrously unreal to him after what he had been through, and the fledgling English School offered, as he later said, “a creative response to change—change in society and civilization that had been made unignorable by the war,”1 in contrast to the Oxford course, which reflected “the habit instilled (...)
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  34. HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW]David Egan - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  35. « Ce que les Essais de Montaigne nous apprennent sur le pouvoir cognitif et morale de la littérature ».Emiliano Ferrari - 2016 - Essais. Revue Interdisciplinaire D'Humanités (Les usages critiques de Montaign):83-96.
    From Martha Nussbaum to Terence Cave, contemporary literary criticism and philosophy question the moral and cognitive value of literature. Founding their anthropological and moral investigation on a cognitive and pragmatic usage of fictional and non-fictional literature, Montaigne’s Essais offers a striking example of the productive and close relations between literature, philosophy and life.
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  36. Narrative, Identity, and the Disunity of Life.Feuerhahn Niels - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):526-548.
    The notion that narratives play an important cognitive role in our ability to make sense of the world has become an intellectual commonplace. Peter Lamarque notes that “narratives are prominent in human lives, not only in the obvious places like literature, history and biography, but in virtually all forms of reflective cognition.”1 The argument that I present in this paper draws on a particular understanding of the significance of narrative for the constitution of selfhood. This understanding was first articulated by (...)
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  37. Literary Style.Wolfgang Huemer - 2016 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), Routledge companion to philosophy of literature. Routledge.
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  38. Diurno e Noturno no pensamento de Gaston Bachelard.Fernando Machado - 2016 - Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 7 (13):11-23.
    O presente artigo tem por objetivo caracterizar as duas fases do pensamento bachelardiano intituladas diurna e noturna e o modo como determinadas noções que permeiam as duas etapas da filosofia do autor configuram uma comunicação recíproca entre elas, fazendo com que haja uma troca assídua de valores entre ambas as vertentes. Deste modo, tentar-se-á demonstrar o quanto o fluxo de uma fase a outra de seu pensamento denota um sentido de completude ao invés de desconexão, negação ou mesmo oposição. Conceitos (...)
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  39. The Value of Literature.Rafe McGregor - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    The Value of Literature provides an original and compelling argument for the historical and contemporary significance of literature to humanity.
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  40. The Crisis of Subjectivity: The Significance of Darstellung and Freedom in E. T. A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman".Elizabeth Purcell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):44-58.
    In the latter part of the eigthteenth century, philosophers faced a problem with respect to moral freedom. They were concerned not only with an account of how one could be free in the Newtonian system of nature but also with how it might be possible to represent that freedom. The imagination provided an answer. The imagination, thought to have limitless potential through aesthetic experiences and judgments, provided the bridge between our abstract, intellectual understanding of the world and the conditions of (...)
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  41. "Thick" Aesthetic Emotions and the Autonomy of Art.Mark Silcox - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):415-430.
    For the properly “cultivated,” proclaimed Oscar Wilde in 1890, “beautiful things mean only Beauty.”1 The idea that artworks possess a discrete and autonomous type of value, by virtue of their capacity to provoke a distinctively aesthetic type of response, is most often associated with artists and critics belonging to the modernist tradition of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Certainly, many influential writers of the period who expressed more instrumentalist attitudes toward the value of their own work, such as (...)
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  42. The Myth of Narcissus as a Surreptitious Allegory About Creativity.Greg Stone - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):273-284.
    Perhaps no myth is more misunderstood than the story of Narcissus, who is erroneously thought to be self-absorbed, egotistical, and vain. Adding to the confusion, a growth industry on narcissism has emerged in academic circles. case in point: Professor Daniel Ames of columbia business School devised a brief personality test with sixteen binary choices such as “I am going to be a great person” or “I hope I am going to be successful.”1 One student did so “well” that he boasted (...)
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  43. Literature and the Conservative Ideal.Mark Zunac (ed.) - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    The essays in this collection all treat in some way the conservative’s vision of society as it is variously manifested in literary art, its scholarship, and its transmission through classical modes of liberal learning. Responding in part to the postmodernist turn in literary study, Literature and the Conservative Ideal examines the ways in which conservatism has been depicted in literature, as well as how its tendencies might restore literature’s potential as an artistic reflection of the universal human condition.
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  44. Antigone After Auschwitz.Debra Bergoffen - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):249-259.
    In the preface to the 1853 first edition of his poems, Matthew Arnold claimed that it was no longer possible to be interested in the quarrel staged in Antigone. He found the conflict between a sister’s duty to bury her brother and a king’s insistence on obedience to the laws of the state passé.1 Living in an age in which souls mattered more than bodies, and in a time when mass graves filled with murdered and mutilated bodies were not part (...)
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  45. Drawing From Life.Brandon Cooke - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (4):449-464.
    Felicia Ackerman argues that it is often wrong to use real people in fiction because it harms them. I argue that even when drawing from life is wrong, the unethical use of real people as literary material may nonetheless be rationally justified, and not in purely self-interested, instrumentalist terms. Either ethical considerations are always overriding, and much of our creative and appreciative practices are morally corrupt, or ethical and aesthetic values are incommensurable. I defend the plausibility of the incommensurabilist alternative, (...)
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  46. The Literary Essay and the ESL Student: A Case Study. Gaskins - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (2):99.
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  47. Noble Savages and English Gardeners: Kulturkritik From Rousseau to Goethe.Franz R. Kempf - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):422-442.
    “The human being embodies a tension between a nature which has since been lost and an unreachable Divine Creator,” writes Rudolf Borchardt in his book The Passionate Gardener. And he continues: “The garden stands at precisely the center of this tension and displaces itself, in accord with its fluctuations in the epoch and the individual, toward one or the other: toward nature or creativity. This is the deepest reason for which the human being dreams that our origins lie in a (...)
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  48. Nihilism in Samuel Beckett's The Lost Ones: A Tale for Holocaust Remembrance.David Kleinberg-Levin - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):212-233.
    In 1966, Samuel Beckett wrote, and then abandoned, a short story to which he eventually gave the title Le dépeupleur. In 1970, he completed it to his satisfaction and it was published.1 Two years later, it was issued in an English translation prepared by Beckett himself, who gave it the very different title The Lost Ones. In this story, Beckett is, like Dante, inventing narrative images of a “realm” or “world” in which matters of the utmost existential and moral gravity (...)
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  49. Who Killed Arnold Baffin?: Iris Murdoch and Philosophy by Literature.David Robjant - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):178-194.
    Iris Murdoch’s The Black Prince is narrated by a convicted felon named Bradley Pearson, looking back on his former adventures culminating in the death of the author Arnold Baffin. Bradley writes while in prison for Arnold’s murder, and between various speculative and philosophical remarks on Love and Art, Bradley relates a story that, if true, would make his conviction a miscarriage of justice. According to Bradley, Arnold was a victim of domestic violence, killed by his wife, Rachel. The fact that (...)
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  50. The Guide for the Perplexed by Maimonides: Transfigurations of a Book.Shoshana Ronen - 2015 - Estetyka I Krytyka 38:65-84.
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1 — 50 / 236