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  1. A Logical Redeemer: Kirillov in Dostoevsky’s 'Demons'.Derek Allan - 2014 - Journal of European Studies 44 (2).
    The engineer Kirillov, a major character in Dostoevsky's 'Demons', has provoked considerable critical disagreement. In 'The Myth of Sisyphus', Albert Camus argues that he expresses the theme of ‘logical suicide’ with ‘the most admirable range and depth’. Some recent commentators, however, have dismissed Kirillov as a madman in the grip of a mad theory. -/- While dissenting from Camus’s analysis in certain respects, this article offers an interpretation consistent with his basic argument. Kirillov’s suicide is based on a simple, if (...)
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  2. 'Les Liaisons Dangereuses' Through the Eyes of André Malraux.Derek Allan - 2012 - Journal of European Studies 42 (2):123-139.
    Choderlos de Laclos’s novel 'Les Liaisons dangereuses', first published in 1782, is regarded as one of the outstanding works of French literature. This article concerns a well known commentary by the twentieth-century writer André Malraux which, though often mentioned by critics, has seldom been studied in detail. The article argues that, while Malraux endorses the favourable modern assessments of 'Les Liaisons dangereuses', his analysis diverges in important respects from prevailing critical opinion. In particular, he regards the work as the commencement (...)
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  3. An Inhuman Transcendence: Perken in Malraux's 'La Voie Royale’.Derek Allan - 1995 - Journal of European Studies 25:109-121.
    Examines an aspect of Malraux's exploration of action as a value.
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  4. André Malraux: The Commitment to Action in 'La Condition Humaine'.Derek Allan - 1988 - In Harold Bloom (ed.), André Malraux's Man's Fate. Chelsea House.
    Discusses the function of action in Malraux's third and most famous novel.
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  5. The Psychology of a Terrorist: Tchen in 'La Condition Humaine'.Derek Allan - 1982 - Nottingham French Studies 21 (1):48-66.
    Discusses the psychology of the terrorist Tchen in Malraux's 'Man's Fate'.
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  6. Pleurer À Chaudes Larmes de Crocodile.Carola Barbero - 2013 - Philosophiques 40 (1):45.
    Carola Barbero | : Je m’intéresse dans cet article aux émotions que nous ressentons lorsque nous lisons une oeuvre de fiction. Certains philosophes pensent que notre implication émotionnelle dans la fiction constitue un paradoxe, et implique soit une forme d’irrationalité, soit la participation à un jeu de « faire semblant ». Ici, je soutiendrai qu’une Théorie de l’Objet à la Meinong, en défendant une approche réaliste des émotions liées la fiction, permet de résoudre adéquatement ce paradoxe de la fiction. | (...)
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  7. Art and Morality.José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
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  8. Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind.Bijoy H. Boruah - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In response to this, (...)
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  9. Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions.Stuart Brock - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
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  10. Empathy at the Confluence of Neuroscience and Empirical Literary Studies.Michael Burke, Anezka Kuzmicova, Anne Mangen & Theresa Schilhab - 2016 - Scientific Study of Literature 6 (1):6-41.
    The objective of this article is to review extant empirical studies of empathy in narrative reading in light of (i) contemporary literary theory, and (ii) neuroscientific studies of empathy, and to discuss how a closer interplay between neuroscience and literary studies may enhance our understanding of empathy in narrative reading. An introduction to some of the philosophical roots of empathy is followed by tracing its application in contemporary literary theory, in which scholars have pursued empathy with varying degrees of conceptual (...)
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  11. Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music.Christopher Butler - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    How do the arts give us pleasure? Covering a very wide range of artistic works, from Auden to David Lynch, Rembrandt to Edward Weston, and Richard Strauss to Keith Jarrett, Pleasure and the Arts offers us an explanation of our enjoyable emotional engagements with literature, music, and painting. The arts direct us to intimate and particularized relationships, with the people represented in the works, or with those we imagine produced them. When we listen to music, look at a purely abstract (...)
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  12. Perspectives in Imaginative Engagement with Fiction.Elisabeth Camp - unknown
    I take up three puzzles about our emotional and evaluative responses to fiction. First, how can we even have emotional responses to characters and events that we know not to exist, if emotions are as intimately connected to belief and action as they seem to be? One solution to this puzzle claims that we merely imagine having such emotional responses. But this raises the puzzle of why we would ever refuse to follow an author’s instructions to imagine such responses, since (...)
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  13. Radford and Allen on Being Moved by Fiction: A Rejoinder.William Charlton - 1986 - British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):391-394.
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  14. Being Moved.Florian Cova & Julien Deonna - 2013 - Philosophical Studies (3):1-20.
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
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  15. The Moral Psychology of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
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  16. Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume.E. M. Dadlez - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the (...)
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  17. Fiction, Emotion, and Rationality.E. M. Dadlez - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):290-304.
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  18. Emotion and Fiction.R. M. J. Dammann - 1992 - British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (1):13-20.
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  19. Moral Dispositions and the Psychology of Fiction.Jeffrey Thomas Dean - 1999 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    In this essay, I defend a particular view of how fiction affects our conception of the real world, our emotions, and our moral dispositions. Moreover, I aim to show how each of these elements are interconnected, such that an adequate understanding of one entails an adequate understanding of the others. In particular, I argue that fiction is especially adept at modifying the conceptual schemas that shape our classifications of and responses to persons, actions, and events in the real world. I (...)
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  20. Celan's Song: Pictures, Poetry and Epistemic Value.A. E. Denham - 2015 - In John Gibson (ed.), Philosophy & Poetry. Oxford University Press.
  21. Zur Interpretation der Emotionen Fiktiver Figuren in Fiktionaler Literatur: Eine Systematische Analyse Anhand von Flauberts "Madame Bovary".Wolfgang Detel - 2015 - In Jan Borkowski, Stefan Descher, Felicitas Ferder & Philipp David Heine (eds.), Literatur interpretieren: Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zur Theorie und Praxis. Mentis. pp. 277-314.
    Die Hypothese meines Beitrags ist, dass Interpretationen fiktionaler Romane zum Teil rationale Erklärungen der emotionalen Zustände fiktiver Romanfiguren sein sollten. Der Hintergrund dieser Hypothese ist zum einen die generelle Definition von Interpretationen als rationalen Erklärungen und zum anderen die neue Theorie der affektiven Intentionalität von Gefühlen (eine Variante der kognitiven Gefühlstheorie). Diese Theorie unterscheidet mehrere Komponenten von Gefühlen und weist nach, dass eine überwiegend rationale Vernetzung dieser Komponenten eine notwendige Bedingung für ihre Interpretation ist (Abschnitt 1). Dieser methodische Zugriff lässt (...)
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  22. Passions of the Intellect: A Study of Polemics.Andreas Dorschel - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (4):679-684.
    Polemics are a sort of critique typically suffused with inimical emotions and passions. But how are these emotions and passions to be construed? Neither authorial expression nor actual arousal properly account for their rôle in polemics. Rather, the polemicist must stage an unequal battle between a polemical self and the polemical target vis-à-vis an anticipated audience, skilfully handling, through his words, the emotions ascribed to each of them.
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  23. Walton's Quasi-Emotions Do Not Go Away.Miguel F. Dos Santos - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):265-274.
    The debate about how to solve the paradox of fiction has largely been a debate between Kendall Walton and the so-called thought theorists. In recent years, however, Jenefer Robinson has argued, based on her affective appraisal theory of emotion, for a noncognitivist solution to the paradox as an alternative to the thought theorists’ solution and especially to Walton's controversial solution. In this article, I argue that, despite appearances to the contrary, Robinson's affective appraisal theory is compatible with Walton's solution, at (...)
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  24. Giving Emotions Their Due.Susan Feagin - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):89-92.
    It is a widespread view that affective and emotional responses to many works of literature are often components of an appreciation of literature that is richer than it would be without them. In this paper, I raise three points designed to show that Lamarque does not give emotional and other affective responses their due. First, I propose that he does not sufficiently distinguish emotion and imagination from concerns about knowledge and truth. Second, he does not sufficiently distinguish appreciation, and the (...)
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  25. Book Review: Reading with Feeling. [REVIEW]Susan L. Feagin - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (1).
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  26. Some Pleasures of Imagination.Susan L. Feagin - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):41-55.
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  27. Plato’s Mimetic Art: The Power of the Mimetic and Complexity of Reading Plato.Gene Fendt - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:239-252.
    Plato’s dialogues are self-defined as works of mimetic art, and the ancients clearly consider mimesis as working naturally before reason and beneath it. Such aview connects with two contemporary ideas—Rene Girard’s idea of the mimetic basis of culture and neurophysiological research into mirror neurons. Individualityarises out of, and can collapse back into our mimetic origin. This para-rational notion of mimesis as that in which and by which all our knowledge is framed requires we not only concern ourselves with Socrates’s arguments (...)
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  28. The Problem of Reading Confessions: Augustine’s Double Argument Against Drama.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, an echo of Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the suffering nor to aid (...)
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  29. Pleurer et rire pour de vrai.Maurizio Ferraris - 2013 - Philosophiques 40 (1):23-44.
    Maurizio Ferraris | : L’une des réponses au paradoxe de la fiction consiste à dire que les émotions que nous éprouvons face aux oeuvres de fiction ne sont pas véritables. Mais qu’est-ce que pleurer ou rire pour de vrai ? En fait, presque toutes les formes de rire ou de larmes, et de réactions émotionnelles, sont compatibles avec la fiction, y compris celles qui sont des émotions vraies. Ce qui pose problème dans le paradoxe est la prémisse selon laquelle nos (...)
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  30. Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art. [REVIEW]Curtis Fogel - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (2):289-292.
  31. The Value of Being: Thoreau on Appreciating the Beauty of the World.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2012 - In Rick A. Furtak, Jonathan Ellsworth & James D. Reid (eds.), Thoreau's Importance for Philosophy (Fordham, 2012). pp. 112-126.
  32. Projective Properties and Expression in Literary Appreciation.Elisa Galgut - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):143-153.
    The paper defends Wollheim’s account of aesthetic expressive perception by showing that it may fruitfully be extended to artistic genres other than painting. The paper hopes to show the richness of Wollheim’s theory of expressive projection as an account of aesthetic perception. In investigating the application of Wollheim’s account of artistic expression to literature, I shall illustrate how understanding expression as the result of the projective activity of the writer is a useful way of understanding some of the expressive properties (...)
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  33. Tragedy and Reparation.Elisa Galgut - 2009 - In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The Kleinian psychoanalyst Hanna Segal argues for the reparative nature of art, and especially of the genre of classical tragedy. According to Kleinian theory, healthy psychological development requires that early infantile aggressive and destructive emotions are worked through; such “working through” is necessary for the development of conscience, for feelings of empathy, as well as for cognitive development. It is also a necessary condition for creative activity. Segal examines the roots of the impulse to create by looking specifically at the (...)
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  34. Imaginative Resistance Revisited.Tamar Szabo Gendler - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press. pp. 149-173.
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  35. The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.
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  36. Genuine Rational Fictional Emotions.Tamar Szabó Gendler & Karson Kovakovich - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. pp. 241-253.
    The “paradox of fictional emotions” involves a trio of claims that are jointly inconsistent but individually plausible. Resolution of the paradox thus requires that we deny at least one of these plausible claims. The paradox has been formulated in various ways, but for the purposes of this chapter, we will focus on the following three claims, which we will refer to respectively as the Response Condition, the Belief Condition and the Coordination Condition.
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  37. Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2000 - Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure in artworks (...)
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  38. Professor.John Gibson - forthcoming - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge.
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  39. Empathy.John Gibson - 2015 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge. pp. 200-219.
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  40. Grief and Belief.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):103-107.
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  41. That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
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  42. Eifring, Halvor, Ed., Love and Emotions in Traditional Chinese Literature.Paul R. Goldin - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):237-240.
  43. Fact, Fiction and Feeling.Oswald Hanfling - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (4):356-366.
    I consider and reject two kinds of solution of the problem of feelings about fictional objects: that the relevant beliefs are not really different as between fiction and fact; and that the relevant feelings are not 'really the same'. The problem should be seen in the context of different phases in acquiring the relevant feeling-concepts and I distinguish three such phases. The first is necessarily 'presentational': the child is presented with suitable objects or pictures and responds with appropriate feelings, without (...)
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  44. Review of Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art[REVIEW]James Harold - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).
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  45. Infected by Evil.James Harold - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):173 – 187.
    In this paper I argue that there is good reason to believe that we can be influenced by fictions in ways that matter morally, and some of the time we will be unaware that we have been so influenced. These arguments fall short of proving a clear causal link between fictions and specific changes in the audience, but they do reveal rather interesting and complex features of the moral psychology of fiction. In particular, they reveal that some Platonic worries about (...)
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  46. How We Can Be Moved by Anna Karenina, Green Slime, and a Red Pony.Glenn A. Hartz - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (4):557-578.
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  47. The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling.Gertrude Himmelfarb - 2006 - Ivan R. Dee.
    Edmund Burke : apologist for Judaism? -- George Eliot : the wisdom of Dorothea -- Jane Austen : the education of Emma -- Charles Dickens : "a low writer" -- Benjamin Disraeli : the Tory imagination -- John Stuart Mill : the other Mill -- Walter Bagehot : "a divided nature" -- John Buchan : an untimely appreciation -- The Knoxes : a God-haunted family -- Michael Oakeshott : the conservative disposition -- Winston Churchill : "quite simply, a great man" (...)
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  48. Fruitful Imagining: On Catherine Wilson's 'Grief and the Poet'.Susan James - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):97-101.
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  49. Rational Fear of Monsters.R. Joyce - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2):209-224.
    Colin Radford must weary of defending his thesis that the emotional reactions we have towards fictional characters, events, and states of affairs are irrational.1 Yet, for all the discussion, the issue has not, to my mind, been properly settled—or at least not settled in the manner I should prefer—and so this paper attempts once more to debunk Radford’s defiance of common sense. For some, the question of whether our emotional responses to fiction are rational does not arise, for they are (...)
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  50. Loving Reading: Erotics of the Text.Steven G. Kellman - 1985 - Archon Books.
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