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  1. added 2020-05-05
    Literature and Philosophical Progress.Eileen John - 2018 - Metodo 1 (6):17-40.
    This paper addresses the question of how literary and philosophical thinking can converge in experience of a literary work. Peter Lamarque and Stein Haugom Olsen, in Truth, Fiction, and Literature, dispute this possibility. I respond to their view with particular attention to their account of thematic interpretation. Thematic interpretation is presented here as involving thought about the reasons behind a work’s use of its content and other features. Those reasons have an implicit generality that allows us to move from literary (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-01
    Irony and Cognitive Empathy in Chrétien de Troyes's Gettier Problem.Brian J. Reilly - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):169-184.
    The relations of comparison and contrast among the viewpoints of characters and between the viewpoints of authors and characters is one of the most important dimensions of meaning in literary texts.... It is for this reason that the analysis of irony, as a central tonal medium for registering differences in point of view, occupies a position of singular importance in the interpretation of literary meaning.Irony stings. Among friends it might be playful, its target joining in the fun. But it is (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-01
    The First Trial of Socrates.George T. Hole - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):1-15.
    Before the Apology trial by five hundred of his fellow Athenians, Socrates is put on trial by a close associate, Alcibiades, in the Symposium. The first trial prefigures or echoes the second, famous one. The speeches on love that precede the entrance of Alcibiades, especially Socrates's speech—in which he discloses instructions on love given to him by Diotima—is the basis on which Socrates should be judged. Because the jury for this trial does not render a verdict, I assume the role (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-01
    Coherence, Literary and Epistemic.Charles Repp - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):59-71.
    Coherence is a term of art in both epistemology and literary criticism, and in both contexts judgments of coherence carry evaluative significance. However, whereas the epistemic use of the term picks out a property of belief sets, the literary use can pick out properties of various elements of a literary work, including its plot, characters, and style. For this reason, some have claimed that literary critics are not concerned with the same concept of coherence as epistemologists. In this article I (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-01
    Knowledge of People.Humberto Brito - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):207-214.
    Philosophers such as Elizabeth Anscombe and Donald Davidson have explained that we cannot derive predictions from judgments such as "he boasted from vanity." Such judgments are also the source of countless painful mistakes. However, are they necessarily unreliable? Often enough, even if only gradually and partially, we get people right. Assuming that we do is already assuming that there must be a connection, if not causal then at least casual, between what a person is, what she does, and how she (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-01
    Trusting the Author: On Narrative Tension and the Puzzle of Audience Anxiety.W. Scott Clifton - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):325-346.
    In the opening episode of season four of the AMC network’s television show Breaking Bad, the attentive viewer reaches a point at which it’s difficult to see how the show’s heroes, Walter White and Jesse Pinkman, will escape death. The two are chemists and manufacturers of crystal methamphetamine for drug kingpin Gus Fring. At the end of the previous season they had picked up on Fring’s plans to kill them and replace them with another chemist, Gale Boetticher, who by then (...)
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  7. added 2020-05-01
    Irony as a Way of Life: Svevo, Kierkegaard, and Psychoanalysis.Emma Bond - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):431-445.
    “To create fiction is, in fact, a way to abolish reality.”1The main title of this article departs from a statement made by Andrew Cross in the chapter he wrote for The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard, “Neither Either nor Or: the Perils of Reflexive Irony,” which must surely suggest a tantalizing read for anyone familiar with the writings of Italo Svevo. In his chapter, Cross posits Søren Kierkegaard’s theorizing of irony as “not just a verbal strategy, but a way of life.”2 (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-01
    What Does Literary Fiction Help Us Understand?'.Alexandre Leskanich - unknown
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  9. added 2020-05-01
    Joseph Conrad and the Epistemology of Space.John G. Peters - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):98-123.
    Under the sumptuous immensity of the sky, the snow covered the endless forests, the frozen rivers, the plains of an immense country, obliterating the landmarks, the accidents of the ground, levelling everything under its uniform whiteness, like a monstrous blank page awaiting the record of an inconceivable history.Increased interest in the experience of space in literature in recent decades has resulted in numerous commentaries on such topics as colonial space, geographical space, gendered space, liminal space, psychic space, and signifying space. (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-01
    Joining the Past to the Future: The Autobiographical Self in The Things They Carried.Ann M. Genzale - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):495-510.
    Developments in neuroscience over the last few decades have shown an increasing interest in examining art and culture as a means of acquiring a greater understanding of the human brain. By the same token, our knowledge of the brain can be tremendously helpful in the study of cultural output, not only in terms of how culture works in a biological sense but why it remains so indispensable and integral to the well-being of individuals and societies. In Self Comes to Mind, (...)
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  11. added 2020-05-01
    Foucault and Kripke on the Proper Names of Authors.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):383-398.
    The semantic issues that Saul Kripke addressed in Naming and Necessity overlap substantially with those that were addressed by Michel Foucault in “What Is an Author?”. The present essay examines their area of overlap, with a view to showing that each of these works affords a perspective on the other, from which facets that are usually obscure can be brought into view. It shows that Foucault needs to take some assumptions from Kripke’s theory of naming in order to secure one (...)
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  12. added 2020-05-01
    "I Know Who I Am": Don Quixote, Self-Fashioning, and the Humanness of Ordinary Identity.Martinez Felicia - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):511-525.
    What does it mean to know who you are? Is it a matter of knowing your name? The things that you’ve done? The people you love? Such indispensible knowledge is somehow not enough; I can know all of these things, and still feel puzzled about who I am. “I am not the person I once was,” “I am not myself today,” and “I am learning who I am,” are all commonplace poems of a kind: expressive sentences completely at home both (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-01
    Narrative, Identity, and the Disunity of Life.Feuerhahn Niels - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):526-548.
    The notion that narratives play an important cognitive role in our ability to make sense of the world has become an intellectual commonplace. Peter Lamarque notes that “narratives are prominent in human lives, not only in the obvious places like literature, history and biography, but in virtually all forms of reflective cognition.”1 The argument that I present in this paper draws on a particular understanding of the significance of narrative for the constitution of selfhood. This understanding was first articulated by (...)
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  14. added 2020-05-01
    The Crisis of Subjectivity: The Significance of Darstellung and Freedom in E. T. A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman".Elizabeth Purcell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):44-58.
    In the latter part of the eigthteenth century, philosophers faced a problem with respect to moral freedom. They were concerned not only with an account of how one could be free in the Newtonian system of nature but also with how it might be possible to represent that freedom. The imagination provided an answer. The imagination, thought to have limitless potential through aesthetic experiences and judgments, provided the bridge between our abstract, intellectual understanding of the world and the conditions of (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-01
    The Cognitive Value of Philosophical Fiction by Jukka Mikkonen.László Kajtár - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):317-319.
    Many of us read works of fiction passionately not only because of their entertainment value or for their aesthetic inventiveness but also because we feel that they enrich our understanding of ourselves and the world. This is where there seems to be an important resemblance to philosophy. A number of fictional works can be legitimately called “philosophical” because they are thought provoking about issues that works of philosophy explicitly deal with. However, as the hot debate concerning truth through literature or (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-01
    Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective.Berys Gaut - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):84.
    Lamarque and Olsen argue for a “no truth” theory of fiction and literature, holding that there is no essential connection between the concepts of truth and those of fiction or of literature. Instead, they argue for a broadly Gricean account of both. The core of their characterization of the fictionality of a text is that it be the product of an intention that its reader adopt the fictive stance towards it, and the producer of the text intends there to be (...)
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  17. added 2020-05-01
    Donald N. McCloskey, Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1995 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (2):423-427.
    A discussion of one of the three books by which McCloskey launched his own economic rhetoric. The main criticism is that McCloskey enlarged view of rhetoric is still not encompassing enough, being limited to rhetoric in the writing of economic literature, while leaving the function of metaphor and other tropes in the more basic processes of conceptualization, theory change, and construction of 'observed' phenomena.
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  18. added 2020-04-28
    : Law and Literature: Possibilities and Perspectives. Ian Ward. ; Law and Literature Perspectives. Bruce L. Rockwood. ; Law's Stories: Narrative and Rhetoric in the Law. Peter Brooks, Paul Gewirtz.Julie Stone Peters - 1997 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 9 (2):259-274.
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  19. added 2020-04-28
    Vincent's Story: The Importance of Contextualism for Art Education.Anita Silvers - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (3):47.
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  20. added 2020-04-27
    Sartre’s Nausea as Liar Paradox.Richard McDonough - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature 43.
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  21. added 2020-04-27
    What Novels Speak About.Thomas Pavel - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):279-291.
    The first, easiest answer to the question "What do novels speak about?" is D. H. Lawrence's conviction that novels are about "man alive," as quoted at the beginning of Guido Mazzoni's recent book on the theory of the novel.1 In a slightly more explicit accounting, one could say that novels speak about human actions and passions. These answers are the first, because they are plausible and general. They are the easiest, because they state the obvious. And yet, precisely because they (...)
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  22. added 2020-04-27
    Resisting the Habit of Tlön: Whitehead, Borges, and the Fictional Nature of Concepts.Michael L. Thomas - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):81-96.
    Our interpretations of experience determine the limits of what we can do with the world.Jorge Luis Borges's short stories act as narrative experiments with the potential to alter the reader's experience. They provide momentary glimpses into a remixed reality that, through their vivacity, allow us to wonder at the immanent possibilities that emerge when we acknowledge the irreality of language. This function of Borges's writing follows from his understanding of fictions as imaginative verbal constructions that are effective due to their (...)
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  23. added 2020-04-27
    A Bad Theory of Truth in Fiction.Ioan-Radu Motoarcă - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):379-387.
    William D’Alessandro has recently argued that there are no implicit truths in fiction. According to the view defended by D’Alessandro, which he terms explicitism, the only truths in fiction are the ones explicitly expressed therein. In this essay, I argue that explicitism is incorrect on multiple counts. Not only is the argument D’Alessandro gives for it invalid, but explicitism as a theory of truth in fiction fails drastically to account for a number of phenomena that are crucial to our understanding (...)
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  24. added 2020-04-27
    The Promise of World Literature.Theodore George - 2014 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 13 (1):128-143.
    In this essay, the author argues that Gadamer's approach to world literature contributes to the call for us mutually to discover our solidarities with those from different traditions, and, thus also, different linguistic traditions. He holds that the discovery of global solidarities is urgent because current prospects to address the world's political, social and economic challenges have been put in jeopardy by the increasingly ubiquitous use of calculative rationality to manage human relations. Gadamer's concern for us to discover solidarities, however, (...)
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  25. added 2020-04-27
    Text + Work: The Menard Case.Tomas Koblizek, Petr Kot'átko & Martin Pokorný (eds.) - 2013 - Litteraria Pragensia.
    The influence and reputation of Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote, is easily comparable to the impact of groundbreaking theoretical texts. Numerous philosophers, aestheticians and theorists of literature, music, or visual arts have been induced by this short story by J.L. Borges to reconsider the status of the literary work of art, to rethink the relationship between work and text. The essays collected here move from analyses of the identity of the literary work of art, as it is explicitly established (...)
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  26. added 2020-04-27
    Meaning in Literature.Bruce E. Miller - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 29 (2):33.
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  27. added 2020-04-27
    The Politics of Interpretation: Ideology, Professionalism, and the Study of LiteratureLeft Politics and the Literary Profession.Michael Fischer, Patrick Colm Hogan, Lennard J. Davis & M. Bella Mirabella - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (2):157.
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  28. added 2020-04-27
    Stories of Reading: Subjectivity and Literary UnderstandingProspecting: From Reader Response to Literary Anthropology.L. B. Cebik, Michael Steig & Wolfgang Iser - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):261.
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  29. added 2020-04-20
    Philosophy to the Rescue. [REVIEW]Joshua Landy - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):405-419.
    Review of Mark William Roche, Why Literature Matters in the Twenty-First Century, and Frank B. Farrell, Why Does Literature Matter?
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  30. added 2020-04-18
    Conditional Goods and Self-Fulfilling Prophecies: How Literature (as a Whole) Could Matter Again.Joshua Landy - 2013 - Substance 42 (2):48-60.
    This essay argues that literature is neither an intrinsic good (like oxygen) nor a constructed good (like a teddy-bear) but instead a conditional good, like a blueprint. It has immense potential value, but that potential can be actualized only if readers do a certain kind of work; and readers are likely to do that work only if, as a culture, we retain an understanding of what novels and poems both need from us and can give us. This means we need (...)
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  31. added 2020-04-18
    How to Do Things with Fictions.Joshua Landy - 2012 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    How to Do Things with Fictions considers how fictional works, ranging from Chaucer to Beckett, subject readers to a series of exercises meant to fortify their mental capacities. While it is often assumed that fictions must be informative or morally improving in order to be of any real benefit to us, certain texts defy this assumption by functioning as training-grounds for the capacities: in engaging with them we stand not to become more knowledgeable or more virtuous but more skilled, whether (...)
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  32. added 2020-04-18
    Corruption by Literature.Joshua Landy - 2010 - Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2 (1).
    This essay argues not just that literature can corrupt its readers—if literature can improve, it can also corrupt—but that some of that is our fault: by telling people to extract moral lessons from fictions, we’ve set them up to be led astray by writers like Ayn Rand. A global attitude of message-mining sets readers up to be misled, confused, or complacent (because they “gave at the office”), as well as to reject some excellent books. Ironically, the best way to make (...)
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  33. added 2020-04-18
    ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  34. added 2020-02-12
    Fiction and the Weave of Life.Jukka Mikkonen - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):403-406.
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  35. added 2020-01-13
    Woolf and Schopenhauer: Artistic Theory and Practice.James Acheson - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):38-53.
    Virginia Woolf mentions the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer by name only once in her writings, in a book review published in the Times Literary Supplement in 1917.1 Viscount Harberton, author of the book she is reviewing, argues initially that knowledge gained from books is inferior to that derived from practical experience, but later makes a special case for two writers—Schopenhauer and Herbert Spencer. "No praise is too high for them," comments Woolf sarcastically. In "their books, we are told, we shall find (...)
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  36. added 2020-01-13
    Reading Oneself in the Text: Cavell and Gadamer’s Romantic Conception of Reading.David Liakos - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):79-87.
    ABSTRACTCan we gain knowledge by reading literature? This essay defends an account of reading, developed by Stanley Cavell and Hans-Georg Gadamer, that phenomenologically describes the experience of acquiring self-knowledge by reading literary texts. Two possible criticisms of this account will be considered: first, that reading can provide other kinds of knowledge than self-knowledge; and, second, that the theory involves illegitimately imposing subjective meaning onto a text. It will be argued, in response, that the self-knowledge gained in reading allows one to (...)
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  37. added 2020-01-13
    The Social Role of Understanding in G. K. Chesterton's Detective Fiction.Omer Schwartz - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):54-70.
    G. K. Chesterton's fictional detectives stand in stark methodical contrast to scientific detectives such as Sherlock Holmes. While the scientific detective focuses on external reality, seeking to reconstruct the crime, Chesterton's detectives—and Father Brown in particular—are preoccupied with inner perceptions, devoting their energy to understanding other minds. While Holmes may be seen as a positivist driven by the physical sciences, Chesterton's detectives are exegetes, perceiving human beings as a unique species demanding a distinctive approach. They thus reflect Chesterton's view that (...)
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  38. added 2020-01-13
    Responding to E. R. Dodds.Roy Glassberg - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):248-252.
    At the beginning of his essay "On Misunderstanding the Oedipus Rex," E. R. Dodds tells us what prompted him to write it. As Regius Professor of Greek at the University of Oxford, he served as an examiner in the annual undergraduate honors trials, and as such posed the following question: "In what sense, if in any, does the Oedipus Rex attempt to justify the ways of God to man?"1 He divided the responses into three categories. The first of these, the (...)
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  39. added 2020-01-13
    When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
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  40. added 2020-01-13
    Two Responses to Moral Luck.Andrew Ingram - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):434-439.
    I am going to discuss two fictional characters, each of whom embodies opposite reactions to the problem of moral luck identified by Thomas Nagel and Bernard Williams. The two characters are Noah Cross, played by John Huston in Roman Polanski's film Chinatown, and Father Zosima from Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov. Cross takes the existence of moral luck as a reason to fly from moral responsibility. Zosima leaps in the opposite direction, toward unlimited moral responsibility. The responses are the (...)
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  41. added 2020-01-13
    Owen, Wittgenstein, and the Postwar Battle with Language.Ron Ben-Tovim - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):344-360.
    Differences in the work philosophy does and the work art does need not be slighted if it turns out that they cross paths, even to some extent share paths—for example, where they contest the ground on which the life of another is to be examined, call it the ground of therapy.The battlefields of war are often described as a separate world, planet, or universe, far removed from ordinary life. Literary examples of this perception can be seen in several modern works (...)
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  42. added 2020-01-13
    David Hume in To the Lighthouse.Justin W. Keena - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):376-393.
    Imagine a reader expert in the scholarship on To the Lighthouse and yet ignorant of the novel itself. What would such a person, when finally sitting down to read it for the first time, know—or think they know—about its relationship to philosophy? Based solely on the reams of articles, book chapters, and monographs that place the novel in dialogue with one or more philosophers, the first-time reader of To the Lighthouse would predict with confidence and precision which thinkers are most (...)
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  43. added 2020-01-13
    Ender-Shiva: Lord of the Dance.Joshua M. Hall - 2013 - In D. E. Wittkower & Lucinda Rush (eds.), Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide is Child's Play. Chicago, IL, USA: pp. 75-84.
    [First paragraph]: Believe it or not, it’s no exaggeration to say that Ender’s Game has been the most transformative book of my life. In fact, when I first read it, at the age of fifteen, it almost single-handedly initiated a crisis of faith in me that ended up lasting for eight long years. The reason that it was able to do so is that it is positively full of important philosophical ideas (a fact attested to by the very existence of (...)
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  44. added 2020-01-13
    Wittgenstein and Modernism.Michael Fischer - 1986 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):463-466.
    Even in a journal with the welcoming title Philosophy and Literature, contributors rightly feel obliged to explain why they are relating philosophical and literary texts to one another. Seeing literature as an engagingly vivid, "speaking picture" "figuring forth" the difficult abstractions of philosophy was once a default way of linking the two. But such a connection shortchanges the thinking at work in literature, reducing it to a popularizing tool, and overlooks the stories, examples, and metaphors that inform some powerful works (...)
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  45. added 2020-01-13
    Literature And Evil.Georges Bataille & Alastair Hamilton - 1973 - New York: Urizen Books.
    'Literature is not innocent,' stated Georges Bataille in this extraordinary 1957 collection of essays, arguing that only by acknowledging its complicity with the knowledge of evil can literature communicate fully and intensely. These literary profiles of eight authors and their work, including Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal and the writings of Sade, Kafka and Sartre, explore subjects such as violence, eroticism, childhood, myth and transgression, in a work of rich allusion and powerful argument. [Abstract from the (...)
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  46. added 2020-01-07
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  47. added 2020-01-05
    How Literature Delivers Knowledge and Understanding, Illustrated by Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Wharton’s Summer.Rik Peels - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (2):199-222.
    Some philosophers, like Alex Rosenberg, claim that natural science delivers epistemic values such as knowledge and understanding, whereas, say, literature and, according to some, literary studies, merely have aesthetic value. Many of those working in the field of literary studies oppose this idea. But it is not clear exactly how works of literary art embody knowledge and understanding and how literary studies can bring these to the light. After all, literary works of art are pieces of fiction, which suggests that (...)
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  48. added 2019-11-10
    Value Realism and Moral Psychology: A Comparative Analysis of Iris Murdoch and Fyodor Dostoevsky.Nathan P. Carson - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):287-311.
    In his book Iris Murdoch: The Saint and the Artist, Peter J. Conradi suggests that “a task for critics today would seem to be to understand the indebtedness of her demonic, tormented sinners and saints and of the curious coexistence in her work of malevolence and goodness, to the dark tragi-comedies of Dostoevski.”1 In his 1986 essay “Iris Murdoch and Dostoevskii,” Conradi goes even further to argue that Fyodor Dostoevsky has been “unnoticed by commentators, a hovering or brooding presence for (...)
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  49. added 2019-11-10
    What Do We Mean When We Talk About Transcendence? Plato and Virginia Woolf.Robert Baker - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):312-335.
    The Axial Age is an expression invented by Karl Jaspers to refer to a period around the middle of the first millennium, or running from the middle of the first millennium to its end, during which a range of major religions either emerged or were transformed in different places around the world: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, Zoroastrianism in Persia, Platonism in Greece, and prophetic Judaism in Palestine.1 Platonism, to be sure, is not exactly a (...)
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  50. added 2019-11-10
    D. H. Lawrence and the Truth of Literature.Danièle Moyal-Sharrock & Peter Sharrock - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):271-286.
    D. H. Lawrence famously wrote that “art-speech is the only truth.” If we are to give credibility to these words, we must know what Lawrence means by “truth.” Here is the passage in which this expression occurs:Art-speech is the only truth. An artist is usually a damned liar, but his art, if it be art, will tell you the truth of his day. And that is all that matters. Away with eternal truth. Truth lives from day to day, and the (...)
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