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  1. The Issue of Causality in Locke's and Berkley's Philosophies.Sheikh Sho'aee - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 12.
    Judging failed attempts by Descartes in explaining existence, John Locke develops the philosophical school of empiricism which has since been traditionally viewed as a contrast to Descartes' rationalism. He first rejected the so-called innate principles introduced by Descartes' rational school and then referred to sensation and reflection as two major sources of recognition. Locke believed that these two sources lead us to simple and compound concepts. The latter, he says, includes conceptions of substances and relations. Here, the relational compound is (...)
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  2. Locke and Sergeant on Syllogistic Reasoning.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - In Shelley Weinberg & Jessica Gordon-Roth (eds.), The Lockean Mind. Routledge.
    This paper explores Locke’s thinking specifically about syllogisms and more generally about logic and proper logical method. Locke’s texts display a mixed attitude toward syllogisms. On the one hand, he was highly critical of syllogisms and their central role in Scholastic disputation. On the other hand, he sometimes allowed that syllogisms could effectively capture valid forms of inference and could be useful in certain contexts. This paper seeks to explain Locke’s mixed attitude by showing that he believed syllogisms were useful (...)
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  3. Locke, God, and Materialism.Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10:101-31.
    This paper investigates Locke’s views about materialism, by looking at the discussion in Essay IV.x. There Locke---after giving a cosmological argument for the existence of God---argues that God could not be material, and that matter alone could never produce thought. In discussing the chapter, I pay particular attention to some comparisons between Locke’s position and those of two other seventeenth-century philosophers, René Descartes and Ralph Cudworth. -/- Making use of those comparisons, I argue for two main claims. The first is (...)
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  4. In the Shadow of Leviathan: John Locke and the Politics of Conscience.Jeffrey R. Collins - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes and John Locke sit together in the canon of political thought but are rarely treated in common historical accounts. This book narrates their intertwined careers during the Restoration period, when the two men found themselves in close proximity and entangled in many of the same political conflicts. Bringing new source material to bear, In the Shadow of Leviathan establishes the influence of Hobbesian thought over Locke, particularly in relation to the preeminent question of religious toleration. Excavating Hobbes's now (...)
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  5. What the Women of Dublin Did with John Locke.Christine Gerrard - 2020 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 88:171-193.
    William Molyneux's friendship with John Locke helped make Locke's ideas well known in early eighteenth-century Dublin. TheEssay Concerning Human Understandingwas placed on the curriculum of Trinity College in 1692, soon after its publication. Yet there has been very little discussion of whether Irish women from this period read or knew Locke's work, or engaged more generally in contemporary philosophical debate. This essay focuses on the work of Laetitia Pilkington and Mary Barber, two of the Dublin women writers of the so-called (...)
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  6. Richard Baxter and the Mechanical Philosophers. [REVIEW]Patrick J. Connolly - 2019 - Locke Studies 19.
  7. Locke and the Methodology of Newton’s Principia.Patrick J. Connolly - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (3):311-335.
    A number of commentators have recently suggested that there is a puzzle surrounding Locke’s acceptance of Newton’s Principia. On their view, Locke understood natural history as the primary methodology for natural philosophy and this commitment was at odds with an embrace of mathematical physics. This article considers various attempts to address this puzzle and finds them wanting. It then proposes a more synoptic view of Locke’s attitude towards natural philosophy. Features of Locke’s biography show that he was deeply interested in (...)
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  8. John Locke, Edward Stillingfleet and the Quarrel Over Consensus.Daniel Carey - 2017 - Paragraph 40 (1):61-80.
    Philosophical antagonism and dispute — by no means confined to the early modern period — nonetheless enjoyed a moment of particular ferment as new methods and orientations on questions of epistemology and ethics developed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Locke played a key part in them with controversies initiated by the Essay concerning Human Understanding. This essay develops a wider typology of modes of philosophical quarrelling by focusing on a key debate — the issue of whether human nature (...)
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  9. John Locke and Thomas Reid.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2017 - In Sven Bernecker & Kourken Michaelian (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory. pp. 470-479.
  10. Toland and Locke in the Leibniz-Burnett Correspondence.Stewart Duncan - 2017 - Locke Studies 17:117-141.
    Leibniz's correspondence with Thomas Burnett of Kemnay is probably best known for Leibniz's attempts to communicate with Locke via Burnett. But Burnett was also, more generally a source of English intellectual news for Leibniz. As such, Burnett provided an important part of the context in which Locke was presented to and understood by Leibniz. This paper examines the Leibniz-Burnett correspondence, and argues against Jolley's suggestion that "the context in which Leibniz learned about Locke was primarily a theological one". That said, (...)
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  11. English Philosophers and Scottish Academic Philosophy.Giovanni Gellera - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (2):213-231.
    This paper investigates the little-known reception of Thomas Hobbes, Henry More, Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, and John Locke in the Scottish universities in the period 1660–1700. The fortune of the English philosophers in the Scottish universities rested on whether their philosophies were consonant with the Scots’ own philosophical agenda. Within the established Cartesian curriculum, the Scottish regents eagerly taught what they thought best in English philosophy and criticised what they thought wrong. The paper also suggests new sources and (...)
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  12. Whichcote, Shaftesbury and Locke: Shaftesbury’s Critique of Locke’s Epistemology and Moral Philosophy.Friedrich A. Uehlein - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):1031-1048.
    Shaftesbury started his literary career in 1698 with an edition of Whichcote’s sermons. At the same time he worked on An Inquiry Concerning Virtue and his ‘Crudities’, which were incorporated after August 1698 in the Askêmata manuscripts. In this paper I argue that Shaftesbury’s critique of John Locke is based on central ideas from Whichcote’s sermons. In his examination of Locke’s epistemology and moral philosophy he uses Whichcote’s arguments, concepts and keywords. Locke’s rejection of the ‘innate ideas’ reduces man to (...)
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  13. Contrasting Political Theory in the East and West: Ibn Khaldun Versus Hobbes and Locke.Jaan Islam - 2016 - International Journal of Political Theory 1 (1):87-107.
    Recent developments in our globalized world are beginning the scholarly world to answer the question pertaining to the relationship between Islam—a “faith”—and politics and governance. In order to understand the Islamic worldview from the perspective of Ibn Khaldun, with whom many modern Islamists would agree with, a comparison is made with early progenitors of liberalism and the social contract, John Locke and Thomas Hobbes. By understanding the fundamental differences between the theorists, and how Ibn Khaldun’s is completely separate from the (...)
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  14. Introduction to Newton and Empiricism.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-15.
    The introduction considers the state of scholarship on empiricism as a philosophical and historical category, particularly as it pertains to experimental philosophy. It concludes that empiricism properly understood is a rich category encompassing epistemic, semantic, methodological, experimental, and moral elements. Its richness makes it a suitable lens through which to account for actual historical complexity. The introduction relates the category to the work of Sir Isaac Newton, who influenced all of empiricism’s elements.
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  15. Locke and Wilkins on Inner Sense and Volition.Patrick J. Connolly - 2014 - Locke Studies 14:239-259.
    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate two interesting parallels between views discussed in John Wilkins’ Of the Principles and Duties of Natural Religion and positions developed by John Locke in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The first parallel pertains to a faculty of inner sense. Both authors carve out a central role for this introspective perceptual modality. The second parallel pertains to volition and free will. Both authors employ an investigative methodology which privileges first-personal experiences of choosing and (...)
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  16. Natural Religion: Pufendorf and Locke on the Edge of Freedom and Reason.Hannah Dawson - 2013 - In Q. Skinner & M. van Gelderen (eds.), Freedom and the Construction of Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 115-33.
  17. Review Article. [REVIEW]Antonia LoLordo - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:145-175.
    This article discusses Galen Strawson's Locke on Personal Identity: Consciousness and Concernment, and Udo Thiel's The Early Modern Subject.
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  18. John Locke and Damaris Masham, Née Cudworth: Questions of Influence. [REVIEW]Terence Moore - 2013 - Think 12 (34):97-108.
    ExtractDamaris Masham has been described as the first woman philosopher of her Age. Her best known works, published anonymously, were ‘A Discourse Concerning the Love of God’, 1696, and ‘Occasional Thoughts in Reference to a Vertuous or Christian Life’, 1705. To some scholars her ideas, radical for her time, are the ideas of an early feminist. Her correspondents besides Locke, included Leibniz. Damaris was 23 years old and Locke 49 when they first met in 1681.
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  19. John Locke and Damaris Masham, Née Cudworth: Questions of Influence: Moore John Locke and Damaris Masham.Terence Moore - 2013 - Think 12 (34):97-108.
    ExtractDamaris Masham has been described as the first woman philosopher of her Age. Her best known works, published anonymously, were ‘A Discourse Concerning the Love of God’, 1696, and ‘Occasional Thoughts in Reference to a Vertuous or Christian Life’, 1705. To some scholars her ideas, radical for her time, are the ideas of an early feminist. Her correspondents besides Locke, included Leibniz. Damaris was 23 years old and Locke 49 when they first met in 1681.Send article to KindleTo send this (...)
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  20. Mischief and Inconvenience in Seventeenth-Century England.Timothy Stanton - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:93-112.
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  21. Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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  22. Interpreting Newton: Critical Essays.Andrew Janiak & Eric Schliesser (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of specially commissioned essays by leading scholars presents research on Isaac Newton and his main philosophical interlocutors and critics. The essays analyze Newton's relation to his contemporaries, especially Barrow, Descartes, Leibniz and Locke and discuss the ways in which a broad range of figures, including Hume, Maclaurin, Maupertuis and Kant, reacted to his thought. The wide range of topics discussed includes the laws of nature, the notion of force, the relation of mathematics to nature, Newton's argument for universal (...)
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  23. Locke and Leibniz on Religious Faith.Michael Losonsky - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):703 - 721.
    In the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke maintains that ?Reason must be our last Judge and Guide in every Thing,? including matters of religious faith, and this commitment to the primacy of reason is not abandoned in his later religious writings. This essay argues that with regard to the relation between reason and religious faith, Locke is primarily concerned not with evidence, but with consistency, meaning, and how human beings ought to respond to their inclinations, including their inclinations to believe. (...)
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  24. Martine de Gaudemar and Philippe Hamou (Eds.), Locke Et Leibniz. Deux Styles de Rationalité.Mogens Lærke - 2012 - The Leibniz Review 22:153-155.
  25. Martine de Gaudemar and Philippe Hamou , Locke Et Leibniz. Deux Styles de Rationalité.Mogens Lærke - 2012 - The Leibniz Review 22:153-155.
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  26. Lost and Found in Translation?: La Gnoseologia Dell'essay Lockiano Nella Traduzione Francese di Pierre Coste.Davide Poggi - 2012 - L. S. Olschki.
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  27. An Early Critic of Locke: The Anti-Scepticism of Henry Lee.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2011 - Locke Studies 11:17-47.
    Although Henry Lee is often recognized to be an important early critic of Locke's 'way of ideas', his Anti-Scepticism (1702) has hardly received the scholarly attention it deserves. This paper seeks to fill that lacuna. It argues that Lee's criticism of Locke's alleged representationalism was original, and that it was quite different from the more familiar kind of criticism that was launched against Locke's theory of ideas by such thinkers as John Sergeant and Thomas Reid. In addition, the paper offers (...)
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  28. Rational Natural Law and German Sociology: Hobbes, Locke and Tönnies.Niall Bond - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1175 - 1200.
    While the roots of modern German sociology are often traced back to historicism, the importance of rational natural law in the inception of the founding work of German sociology, Gemeinschaft und Gesellschaft by Ferdinand Tönnies, intended as a ?creative synthesis? between rational natural law and romantic historicism, should not be overlooked. We show how in his earliest scholarly work on Thomas Hobbes and John Locke the shift in the meaning of the two concepts ?Gemeinschaft? and ?Gesellschaft? represents a departure from (...)
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  29. Karl Marx's Intellectual Roots in John Locke.Eric Allen Engle - 2011 - Postmodern Openings 2 (7):29-37.
    Marx supposedly represents a radical break from liberal individualist property oriented thinking. In fact however, Marx integrates the best points of a variety of liberal individualists, notably Locke and Rousseau, but also to a lesser extent Aristotle and even Plato. Marx is an extension of, not a break from, mainstream thinkers in Western thought: all Marx’s main ideas can be traced to one canonical Western scholar or another. Understanding analytical tools common to both Liberalism and Marxism contextualizes their divergences and (...)
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  30. Property and Territory: Locke, Kant, and Steiner.David Miller - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (1):90-109.
  31. Catharine Cockburn's Enlightenment.Victor Nuovo - 2011 - In V. Nuovo (ed.), Christianity, Antiquity, and Enlightenment: Interpretations of Locke. Springer.
  32. Uneasiness and Passions in Leibniz's Nouveaux Essais II, Xx.Markku Roinila - 2011 - In Breger Herbert, Herbst Jürgen & Erdner Sven (eds.), Natur und Subjekt. IX. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress Vorträge 3. Teil. Leibniz Geschellschaft.
    Chapter 20 of book II of John Locke’s An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, titled ‘Of Modes of Pleasure and Pain’ is the most extensive discussion of emotions available in Locke’s corpus. Likewise, Nouveaux essais sur l’entedement humain, II, xx, together with the following chapter xxi remains the chief source of Leibniz’s views of emotions. They offer a very interesting and captivating discussion of moral philosophy and good life. The chapter provides also a great platform to study Leibniz’s argumentative techniques and (...)
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  33. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume.Udo Thiel - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The Early Modern Subject explores the understanding of self-consciousness and personal identity--two fundamental features of human subjectivity--as it developed in early modern philosophy. Udo Thiel presents a critical evaluation of these features as they were conceived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He explains the arguments of thinkers such as Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Wolff, and Hume, as well as their early critics, followers, and other philosophical contemporaries, and situates them within their historical contexts. Interest in the issues of self-consciousness and (...)
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  34. Ideas Without Causality: One More Locke in Berkeley.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2011 - Locke Studies 11:139-175.
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  35. Paul Thagard.John Locke Bacon, David Hume & Immanuel Kant - 2010 - In Julie Thompson Klein & Carl Mitcham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. Oxford University Press.
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  36. Reconsidering John Sergeant's Attacks on Locke's Essay.Dmitri Levitin - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 20 (4):457-477.
    The Catholic polemicist John Sergeant published three major works of philosophy towards the end of his literary career, The Method to Science (1696), Solid Philosophy (1697) and Metaphysics (1700). They were highly critical of what Sergeant saw as the idea-grounded epistemology of the Cartesians and John Locke, whom he labelled 'ideists'. Previous scholars have interpreted Sergeant's texts as manifestations of his lifelong obsession with certainty, as initially developed in his Restoration polemics against Anglican divines. Using a previously neglected autobiographical letter, (...)
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  37. Cenzura kao tipografska himera. John Milton i John Locke o gestama.Béla Mester - 2010 - Synthesis Philosophica 25 (2):211-219.
    Namjera je ovog rada pokazati neke elemente Miltonovih i Lockeovih političkih spisa, ovisno o njihovim odnosima prema različitim medijima. Milton u svojoj argumentaciji protiv cenzure mora pokazati da se sve drevne instance za cenzuru, često citirane u njegovom stoljeću, mogu interpretirati kao primjeri drugog fenomena. Međutim, Milton prepoznaje, analizirajući mjesta u Platonovoj Državi i nekim biblijskim temama, doseg i značaj nepojmovnih, netiskanih, neverbalnih oblika komunikacije; on ih opisuje kao znakove djetinjastog, ženskog ili neobrazovanog ponašanja, kao beznačajne fenomene iz perspektive političke (...)
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  38. Die Zensur als typografische Chimäre. John Milton und John Locke zu den Gesten.Béla Mester - 2010 - Synthesis Philosophica 25 (2):211-219.
    Die Intention meiner Arbeit ist, einige Elemente in Miltons und Lockes politischen Schriften aufzuweisen, abhängig von ihren Einstellungen zu diversen Medien. Milton hat in seiner Argumentierung gegen die Zensur darzulegen, dass alle historischen Instanzen der Zensur – gewöhnlich zitiert in seinem Jahrhundert – als Beispiele eines anderen Phänomens ausgedeutet werden können. Demgegenüber erkennt Milton, indem er unterschiedliche Loci in Platons Der Staat sowie einigen biblischen Themen analysiert, die Reichweite als auch Gewichtigkeit der nichtbegrifflichen, ungedruckten, nichtverbalen Kommunikationsformen; er schildert sie als (...)
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  39. Política Cotidiana y Tolerancia en las obras de John Locke y Robert Nozick.Sergio Morresi - 2010 - Dois Pontos 7 (4).
    En 1974, Robert Nozick publicó *Anarquía, Estado y Utopía*, una obra que, por primera vez, otorgaba estatus teórico a una de las corrientes del pensamiento neoliberal: el libertarianismo. En buena medida, el texto de Nozick se reclama como una relectura en clave de filosofía analítica de la teoría política de John Locke. En este artículo se ofrecen algunos argumentos para mostrar que, aunque la perspectiva de Nozick presenta ciertas similitudes retóricas con la obra del filósofo inglés, en cada uno de (...)
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  40. Reconciling Human Freedom and Sin: A Note on Locke's Paraphrase.Jk Numao - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:95-112.
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  41. Except for Locke's Reply to Stillingfleet's First.Pauline Phemister & John Milner - 2010 - In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum. pp. 100.
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  42. Zagadnienie sceptycyzmu w kontekście wpływu myśli Locke’a na filozofię Berkeleya.Piotr K. Szałek - 2010 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 58 (1):229-245.
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  43. The Lockian Materialist Basis of Berkeley's Immaterialism.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:179-197.
  44. The Flow of Influence: From Newton to Locke.. And Back.Steffen Ducheyne - 2009 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 64 (2).
    The Flow of Influence: From Newton to Locke - and Back- In this essay, the affinity between Locke’s empiricism and Newton’s natural philosophy is scrutinized. Parallels are distinguished from influences. I argue, pace G.A.J. Rogers, that Newton’s doctrine of absolute space and time influenced Locke’s Essay concerning Human Understanding from the second edition onwards. I also show that Newton used Lockean terminology in his criticism of Cartesianism. It is further argued that Locke’s endorsement of corpuscularianism is merely methodological, i.e. he (...)
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  45. The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke.Katherine Dunlop - 2009 - Philosophers' Imprint 9:1-31.
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant construes (...)
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  46. Locke,'Some Americans,'and the Discourse on 'Carolina'.James Farr - 2009 - Locke Studies 9:19-96.
  47. Review: Garber and Longuenesse (Eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns[REVIEW]Andrew Janiak - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
  48. Correspondence Between Locke and Molyneux Regarding Personal Identity and the Right to Punish a Drunk Who Just is Not Aware of Their Actions.G. Patarroyo & G. Carlos - 2009 - Ideas Y Valores 58 (139):145-159.
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  49. “Empiricism Contra Experiment: Harvey, Locke and the Revisionist View of Experimental Philosophy”.Alan Salter & Charles T. Wolfe - 2009 - Bulletin d'histoire et d'épistémologie des sciences de la vie 16 (2):113-140.
    In this paper we suggest a revisionist perspective on two significant figures in early modern life science and philosophy: William Harvey and John Locke. Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, is often named as one of the rare representatives of the ‘life sciences’ who was a major figure in the Scientific Revolution. While this status itself is problematic, we would like to call attention to a different kind of problem: Harvey dislikes abstraction and controlled experiments (aside from (...)
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  50. Philipp van Limborch and John Locke. The Arminian Influence on Locke's Theology and Theory of Toleration.Manfred Svensson - 2009 - Pensamiento 65 (244):261-277.
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