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  1. Berkeley and Locke.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - In Samuel C. Rickless (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Berkeley. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter revisits three key disagreements between Locke and Berkeley. The disagreements relate to abstraction, the idea of substance, and the status of the primary/secondary quality distinction. The goal of the chapter is to show that these disagreements are rooted in a more fundamental disagreement over the nature of ideas. For Berkeley, ideas are tied very closely to perceptual content. Locke adopts a less restrictive account of the nature of ideas. On his view, ideas are responsible for both perceptual content (...)
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  2. Catharine Trotter Cockburn. Filosofia morale, religione, metafisica.Emilio De Tommaso (ed.) - 2018 - Soveria Mannelli, Italy: Rubbettino.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn (1679- 1749) fu poetessa, drammaturga e filosofa. La vivacità intellettuale e la forte determinazione le permisero di aggirare il pregiudizio di genere e di sottrarsi alle dinamiche di marginalizzazione femminile tipiche dell’età moderna. Pur celandosi dietro l’anonimato, Cockburn prese parte attiva al dibattito filosofico del tempo, intervenendo soprattutto in materia di morale. Le sue opere filosofiche, scritte in difesa di Locke o di Clarke, custodiscono, nonostante il dichiarato intento apologetico, tratti di originalità e indipendenza, particolarmente evidenti nella (...)
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  3. Locke and the Methodology of Newton’s Principia.Patrick J. Connolly - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (3):311-335.
    A number of commentators have recently suggested that there is a puzzle surrounding Locke’s acceptance of Newton’s Principia. On their view, Locke understood natural history as the primary methodology for natural philosophy and this commitment was at odds with an embrace of mathematical physics. This article considers various attempts to address this puzzle and finds them wanting. It then proposes a more synoptic view of Locke’s attitude towards natural philosophy. Features of Locke’s biography show that he was deeply interested in (...)
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  4. George Berkeley: els arguments positius a favor del immaterialisme i el principi de semblança.Alberto Oya - 2017 - Comprendre 19 (1):83-92.
    L'objectiu d'aquest article és oferir un anàlisi dels arguments principals del Tractat sobre els Principis del Coneixement Humà, de G. Berkeley. Aquests arguments -que es troben a I, §4, I, §5-7 i I, §23 de l'obra de Berkeley- tenen como a objectiu demostrar la inconcebibilitat d'un món extern de caràcter físic. Argumentaré que la validesa d'aquests tres arguments depèn del anomenat «principi de semblança». La conclusió a la que arribaré és que l'acceptació del principi de semblança -i, en conseqüència, dels (...)
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  5. The Idea of Power and Locke's Taxonomy of Ideas.Patrick J. Connolly - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):1-16.
    Locke's account of the idea of power is thought to be seriously problematic. Commentators allege that the idea of power causes problems for Locke's taxonomy of ideas, that it is defined circularly, and that, contrary to Locke's claims, it cannot be acquired in experience. This paper defends Locke's account. Previous commentators have assumed that there is only one idea of power. But close attention to Locke's text, combined with background features of his theory of ideas, supports the drawing of a (...)
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  6. Locke, Pyrard, and Coconuts: Travel Literature, Evidence, and Natural History.Patrick Connolly - 2018 - In J. T. A. Lancaster & R. Raiswell (eds.), Evidence in the Age of the New Sciences. Springer. pp. 103-122.
    Locke had a lifelong love of travel literature. He was also a proponent of the construction of natural histories. Many commentators have noted that there is a close link between these two interests. They suggest that data gleaned from travel literature was used in the construction of natural histories. This paper uses Locke’s reading of François Pyrard’s Voyage to argue that the relationship between the two genres was closer than has been realized. Specifically, it is argued that Pyrard’s discussion of (...)
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  7. Locke's Simple Account of Sensitive Knowledge.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (2):205-239.
    Locke seems to hold that we have knowledge of the existence of external objects through sensation. Two problems face Locke's account. The first problem concerns the logical form of knowledge of real existence. Locke defines knowledge as the perception of the agreement or disagreement between ideas. However, perceiving agreements between ideas seems to yield knowledge only of analytic truths, not propositions about existence. The second problem concerns the epistemic status of sensitive knowledge: How could the senses yield certain knowledge? This (...)
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  8. Lockean Superaddition and Lockean Humility.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:53-61.
    This paper offers a new approach to an old debate about superaddition in Locke. Did Locke claim that some objects have powers that are unrelated to their natures or real essences? The question has split commentators. Some (Wilson, Stuart, Langton) claim the answer is yes and others (Ayers, Downing, Ott) claim the answer is no. This paper argues that both of these positions may be mistaken. I show that Locke embraced a robust epistemic humility. This epistemic humility includes ignorance of (...)
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  9. Tetens und Wolff.Achim Vesper - 2014 - In Udo Thiel & Gideon Stiening (eds.), Johann Nikolaus Tetens : Philosophie in der Tradition des Europäischen Empirismus. De Gruyter. pp. 27-44.
  10. Nicholas Wolterstorff, John Locke and the Ethics of Belief Reviewed By.Peter A. Schouls - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (6):444-446.
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Locke: Skepticism
  1. Kathleen M. Squadrito, "Locke's Theory of Sensitive Knowledge". [REVIEW]Henry G. Van Leeuwen - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):254.
  2. Locke’s Problem Concerning Perceptual Error.Antonia Lolordo - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):705-724.
    This paper argues that Locke cannot provide a satisfactory account of perceptual error.
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  3. Degrees of Certainty and Sensitive Knowledge: Reply to Soles.Samuel C. Rickless - 2015 - Locke Studies 15:99-108.
  4. Locke and Scepticism.S. P. L. & Albert Hofstadter - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (24):662.
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  5. Locke on Knowledge of Existence.Nathan Rockwood - 2016 - Locke Studies 16:41-68.
    The standard objection to Locke’s epistemology is that his conception of knowledge inevitably leads to skepticism about external objects. One reason for this complaint is that Locke defines knowledge as the perception of a relation between ideas, but perceiving relations between ideas does not seem like the kind of thing that can give us knowledge that tables and chairs exist. Thus Locke’s general definition of knowledge seems to be woefully inadequate for explaining knowledge of external objects. However, this interpretation and (...)
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  6. L'existence des choses hors de nous comme objet de conaissance : Locke, Essay, IV, XI.Denis Forest - 2003 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 128 (4):421.
    Locke distingue : la connaissance intuitive, la connaissance rationnelle et la connaissance sensitive. C'est par celle-ci que nous accédons à la connaissance des « autres choses ». Or on peut se demander comment le sens peut être à la fois juge et témoin. En fait, pour Locke, notre connaissance des choses hors de nous a une « fiabilité effective », mais ce n'en est pas une connaissance parfaite, laquelle nous est inaccessible. Locke distinguishes : intuitive knowledge, rational knowledge, and sensitive (...)
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  7. Locke: Knowledge of the External World.Matthew Priselac - 2015
    The problem of how we can know the existence and nature of the world external to our mind is one of the oldest and most difficult in philosophy. The discussion by John Locke (1632-1704) of knowledge of the external world have proved to be some of the most confusing and difficult passages of his entire body of philosophical work.
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  8. Locke's Writings and Philosophy Historically Considered, and Vindicated From the Charge of Contributing to the Scepticism of Hume.Edward Tagart - 1855
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  9. HOFSTADTER, A. -Locke and Scepticism. [REVIEW]R. I. Aaron - 1936 - Mind 45:258.
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  10. Locke and Scepticism.Albert Hofstadter - 1936 - Philosophical Review 45:632.
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  11. Is Sensitive Knowledge 'Knowledge'?Nathan Rockwood - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:15-30.
    In this paper I argue that Locke takes sensitive knowledge (i.e. knowledge from sensation) to be genuine knowledge that material objects exist. Samuel Rickless has recently argued that, for Locke, sensitive knowledge is merely an “assurance”, or a highly probable judgment that falls short of certainty. In reply, I show that Locke sometimes uses “assurance” to describe certain knowledge, and so the use of the term “assurance” to describe sensitive knowledge does not entail that it is less than certain. Further, (...)
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  12. Locke's Reply to the Skeptic.Shelley Weinberg - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):389-420.
    Given his representationalism how can Locke claim we have sensitive knowledge of the external world? We can see the skeptic as asking two different questions: how we can know the existence of external things, or more specifically how we can know inferentially of the existence of external things. Locke's account of sensitive knowledge, a form of non-inferential knowledge, answers the first question. All we can achieve by inference is highly probable judgment. Because Locke's theory of knowledge includes both first order (...)
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  13. Zagadnienie sceptycyzmu w kontekście wpływu myśli Locke’a na filozofię Berkeleya.Piotr K. Szałek - 2010 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 58 (1):229-245.
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  14. Locke’s Account of the Reality of Knowledge.David E. Soles - 1984 - Southwest Philosophy Review 1:42-54.
  15. Locke and Sensitive Knowledge.Keith Allen - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):249-266.
    Locke Defines Knowledge at the beginning of Book IV of the Essay concerning Human Understanding as “the perception of the connexion and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy of any of our Ideas” (E IV.i.2).1 So defined, knowledge varies along two dimensions. On the one hand, there are four “sorts” of knowledge: of identity or diversity; relation; co-existence or necessary connection; and real existence. On the other hand, there are three “degrees” of knowledge: intuitive knowledge, which consists in the “immediate” perception (...)
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  16. Yolton and Rorty on the Veil of Ideas in Locke.Peter Dlugos - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (3):317 - 329.
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  17. Toleration and the Skeptical Inquirer in Locke.Sam Black - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):473 - 504.
    It is a noteworthy achievement of Western liberal democracies that they have largely relinquished the use of force against citizens whose lifestyles offend their members’ sensibilities, or alternatively which violate their members’ sense of truth. Toleration has become a central virtue in our public institutions. Powerful majorities are given over to restraint. They do not, by and large, expect the state to crush eccentrics, nonconformists, and other uncongenial minorities in their midst. What precipitated this remarkable evolution in our political culture?The (...)
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  18. Locke and the Skeptical Argument for Toleration.Sam Black - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (4):355-375.
  19. Symposium: Locke and the Veil of Perception Guest Editor: Vere Chappell - Comments.V. Chappell - unknown
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  20. Locke on Clear Ideas, Demonstrative Knowledge, and the Existence of Substance.Ruth Mattern - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):259-271.
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  21. Locke on Sensitive Knowledge as Knowledge.Scott Stapleford - 2009 - Theoria 75 (3):206-231.
    This article is an extended analysis of the most recent scholarly work on Locke's account of sensitive knowledge. Lex Newman's "dual cognitive relations" model of sensitive knowledge is examined in detail. The author argues that the dual cognitive relations model needs to be revised on both philosophical and historical grounds. While no attempt is made to defend Locke's position, the aim is to show that it is at least consistent, contrary to the received view. The final section provides textual support (...)
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  22. Sensitive Knowledge: Locke on Sensation and Skepticism.Jennifer Nagel - 2016 - In Matthew Stuart (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Locke. Malden, MA, USA: Wiley Blackwell. pp. 313-333.
    In the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke insists that all knowledge consists in perception of the agreement or disagreement of ideas. However, he also insists that knowledge extends to outer reality, claiming that perception yields ‘sensitive knowledge’ of the existence of outer objects. Some scholars have argued that Locke did not really mean to restrict knowledge to perceptions of relations within the realm of ideas; others have argued that sensitive knowledge is not strictly speaking a form of knowledge for Locke. (...)
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  23. Locke on the Knowledge of Material Things.Robert Fendel Anderson - 1965 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (2):205-215.
  24. Knowledge of the External World.Bruce Aune - 1991 - Routledge.
    Many philosophers believe that the traditional problem of our knowledge of the external world was dissolved by Wittgestein and others. They argue that it was not really a problem - just a linguistic `confusion' that did not actually require a solution. Bruce Aune argues that they are wrong. He casts doubt on the generally accepted reasons for putting the problem aside and proposes an entirely new approach. By considering the history of the problem from Descartes to Kant, Aune shows that (...)
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  25. Symposium: Locke and the Veil of Perception Preface.Vere Chappell - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):243–244.
    This symposium comprises five papers on Locke's theory of sense perception. The authors are John Rogers, Gideon Yaffe, Lex Newman, Tom Lennon, and Martha Bolton. There are also comments on the papers, both individually and as a group, by Vere Chappell. In addition to Locke's view of perception, the papers deal with the nature of Lockean ideas and with the question whether Locke is committed to skepticism regarding the external world. The authors (and the commentator) disagree in their readings of (...)
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  26. Locke's 'Constructive Skepticism' -- A Reappraisal.M. Jamie Ferreira - 1986 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (2):211-222.
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  27. Locke’s Problem Concerning Perceptual Error.Antonia Lolordo - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):705-724.
    Locke claims that we have sensitive knowledge of the external world, in virtue of the fact that simple ideas are real, true, and adequate. However, despite his dismissive remarks about Cartesian external-world skepticism, Locke gives us little to go on as to how knowledge of the external world survives the fact of perceptual error, or even how perceptual error is possible. I argue that Locke has an in-principle problem explaining perceptual error.
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  28. A Note on Locke and the Knowledge of Material Things.George Henry Moulds - 1966 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 4 (4):325-325.
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  29. Locke on Sensitive Knowledge and the Veil of Perception – Four Misconceptions.Lex Newman - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):273–300.
    Interpreters of Locke’s Essay are divided over whether to attribute to him a Representational Theory of Perception (RTP). Those who object to an RTP interpretation cite (among other things) Locke’s Book IV account of sensitive knowledge, contending that the account is incompatible with RTP. The aim of this paper is to rebut this kind of objection – to defend an RTP reading of the relevant Book IV passages. Specifically, I address four influential assumptions (about sensitive knowledge) cited by opponents of (...)
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  30. Skepticism: An Anthology.Richard H. Popkin, Maia Neto & José Raimundo (eds.) - 2007 - Prometheus Books.
    Plato -- Pyrrho -- The academics -- Sextus empiricus -- Augustine -- Erasmus -- Gianfrancesco Pico -- Hervet -- Montaigne -- Charron -- Sanchez -- Bacon -- Gassendi -- La Mothe le Vayer -- Descartes -- Pascal -- Glanvill -- Foucher -- Huet -- Locke -- Bayle -- Leibniz -- Crousaz -- Berkeley -- Ramsay -- Hume -- Voltaire -- Diderot -- Rousseau -- Kant -- Schulze -- Stäudlin -- Hegel -- Kierkegaard -- Nietzsche -- James -- Santayana -- Shestov (...)
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  31. Locke's Representationalism Without Veil.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):675 – 696.
  32. Locke on Ideas of Substance and the Veil of Perception.Gideon Yaffe - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):255–272.
Locke: Judgment
  1. Locke, Hume, and Reid on the Objects of Belief.Lewis Powell - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (1):21-38.
    The goal of this paper is show how an initially appealing objection to David Hume's account of judgment can only be put forward by philosophers who accept an account of judgment that has its own sizable share of problems. To demonstrate this, I situate the views of John Locke, David Hume, and Thomas Reid with respect to each other, so as to illustrate how the appealing objection is linked to unappealing features of Locke's account of judgment.
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  2. Association, Madness, and the Measures of Probability in Locke and Hume.John Wright - 1987 - In Christopher Fox (ed.), Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century. New York: AMS Press. pp. 103-28.
    This paper argues for the importance of Chapter 33 of Book 2 of Locke's _Essay Concerning Human Understanding_ ("Of the Association of Ideas) both for Locke's own philosophy and for its subsequent reception by Hume. It is argued that in the 4th edition of the Essay of 1700, in which the chapter was added, Locke acknowledged that many beliefs, particularly in religion, are not voluntary and cannot be eradicated through reason and evidence. The author discusses the origins of the chapter (...)
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  3. Locke, Innate Ideas and the Ethics of Belief.G. Moyal - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
  4. Locke’s Concept of Religious Assent.J. T. Moore - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):25-30.
  5. Degrees of Certainty and Sensitive Knowledge: Reply to Soles.Samuel C. Rickless - 2015 - Locke Studies 15:99-108.
  6. John Locke and the Ethics of Belief.Nicholas Wolterstorff - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff discusses the ethics of belief which Locke developed in Book IV of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, where Locke finally argued his overarching aim: how we ought to govern our belief, especially on matters of religion and morality. Wolterstorff shows that this concern was instigated by the collapse, in Locke's day, of a once-unified moral and religious tradition in Europe into warring factions. His was thus a culturally and socially engaged epistemology. This view of Locke invites a new (...)
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  7. Locke.Michael Ayers - 1993 - Routledge.
    John Locke is the greatest English philosopher. _An Essay Concerning Human Understanding_, one of the most influential books in the history of thought, is his greatest work. In this study the historical meaning and philosophical significance of Locke's _Essay_ are investigated more comprehensively than ever before. _Locke_ was originally published in two volumes, _Epistemology_ and _Ontology_. This paperback edition has within its covers the full text of both volumes.
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  8. John Locke's Theory of Judgment.M. Cecille Reddin - unknown
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