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  1. Semiotics and Knowledge in John Locke.Ionel BuȘe - forthcoming - Annals of the University of Craiova, Series: Philosophy:39-49.
  2. The Empirical and the Reasoning in John Locke's Conception.Mihail Simion - forthcoming - Annals of the University of Craiova, Series: Philosophy:62-66.
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  3. Silence as an Argument and a Manifestation of Respect in the Argumentation in John Locke's Works.Olena Shcherbyna & Nataliia Shcherbyna - 2019 - Sententiae 38 (2):6-18.
    In the article, referring to the method of rational reconstruction described by R. Rorty, an analysis of some works of J. Locke has been made in order to identify new prospects in John Locke's philosophy researches. As a result, it’s been demonstrated the presence of silence as an argument and a manifestation of respect J. Locke’s research of realms of cognition, political philosophy and philosophy of education. This is not covered in modern John Locke's philosophy researches. The authors emphasize that (...)
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  4. Review of Jonathan S. Marko, Measuring the Distance Between Locke and Toland. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2018 - Locke Studies 18.
  5. Deep Epistemic Vices.Ian James Kidd - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Research 43:43-67..
    Although the discipline of vice epistemology is only a decade old, the broader project of studying epistemic vices and failings is much older. This paper argues that contemporary vice epistemologists ought to engage more closely with these earlier projects. After sketching some general arguments in section one, I then turn to deep epistemic vices: ones whose identity and intelligibility depends on some underlying conception of human nature or the nature of reality. The final section then offers a case study from (...)
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  6. Logical Normativity and Rational Agency—Reassessing Locke's Relation to Logic.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):75-99.
    There is an exegetical quandary when it comes to interpreting Locke's relation to logic.On the one hand, over the last few decades a substantive amount of literature has been dedicated to explaining Locke's crucial role in the development of a new logic in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Yolton names this new logic the "logic of ideas," while James Buickerood calls it "facultative logic."1 Either way, Locke's Essay is supposedly its "most outspoken specimen" or "culmination."2 Call this reading the (...)
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  7. História Natural E Ateísmo Antropológico Em John Locke.Saulo Henrique Souza Silva - 2018 - Cadernos Espinosanos 38:107-126.
    O objetivo deste artigo é dar relevo à presença da argumentação histórica e antropológica nas obras publicadas por John Locke entre 1689 e 1695. Essa orientação defende a existência de uma diversidade de povos e costumes ao redor do mundo, tomando como base as comunidades longínquas descritas nos relatos de viagens. Entre os tipos de povos considerados por Locke, existem sociedades ateias, idólatras, de moral filosófica e, poder-se-ia dizer, culmina com a defesa do cristianismo como a religião mais apropriada para (...)
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  8. Action, Knowledge and Embodiment in Berkeley and Locke.Tom Stoneham - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations 21 (1):41-59.
    Embodiment is a fact of human existence which philosophers should not ignore. They may differ to a great extent in what they have to say about our bodies, but they have to take into account that for each of us our body has a special status, it is not merely one amongst the physical objects, but a physical object to which we have a unique relation. While Descartes approached the issue of embodiment through consideration of sensation and imagination, it is (...)
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  9. From Locke to Materialism: Empiricism, the Brain and the Stirrings of Ontology.Charles Wolfe - 2018 - In Anne-Lise Rey & Siegfried Bodenmann (eds.), What Does It Mean to Be an Empiricist?: Empiricisms in Eighteenth Century Sciences. Springer Verlag. pp. 235-263.
    My topic is the materialist appropriation of empiricism—as conveyed in the ‘minimal credo’ nihil est in intellectu quod non fuerit in sensu. That is, canonical empiricists like Locke go out of their way to state that their project to investigate and articulate the ‘logic of ideas’ is not a scientific project: “I shall not at present meddle with the Physical consideration of the Mind”. Indeed, I have suggested elsewhere, contrary to a prevalent reading of Locke, that the Essay is not (...)
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  10. John Locke on Cognitive Virtues.Artur Ravilevich Karimov - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (3):221-227.
    In this paper we interpret and examine critically John Locke’s ideas on cognitive virtues and values presented in his The Conduct of the Understanding. We believe that the cognitive subject’s virtues discussed by Locke are universal. We believe that knowledge and understanding must and can be guided by the pursuit of truth. But this concerns only the motivation component of knowledge, and not its success which is ultimately determined by the epistemic environment.
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  11. Locke’s Science of Knowledge.Matt Priselac - 2016 - Routledge.
    John Locke’s _An Essay Concerning Human Understanding_ begins with a clear statement of an epistemological goal: to explain the limits of human knowledge, opinion, and ignorance. The actual text of the _Essay_, in stark contrast, takes a long and seemingly meandering path before returning to that goal at the _Essay_’s end—one with many detours through questions in philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and philosophy of language. Over time, Locke scholarship has come to focus on Locke’s contributions to these parts of philosophy. (...)
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  12. Locke on Knowing Our Own Ideas.Shelley Weinberg - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):347-370.
    Locke defines knowledge as the perception of the agreement or disagreement of ideas. Nevertheless, he claims that we know particular things: the identity of our ideas, our own existence, and the existence of external objects. Although much has been done to reconcile the definition of knowledge with our knowledge of external objects, there is virtually nothing in the scholarship when it comes to knowing ideas or our own existence. I fill in this gap by arguing that perceptions of ideas are (...)
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  13. Locke: Knowledge of the External World.Matthew Priselac - 2015
    The problem of how we can know the existence and nature of the world external to our mind is one of the oldest and most difficult in philosophy. The discussion by John Locke (1632-1704) of knowledge of the external world have proved to be some of the most confusing and difficult passages of his entire body of philosophical work.
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  14. Locke and Newton on Space and Time and Their Sensible Measures.Edward Slowik & Geoffrey Gorham - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press: pp. 119-137.
    It is well-known that Isaac Newton’s conception of space and time as absolute -- “without reference to anything external” (Principia, 408) -- was anticipated, and probably influenced, by a number of figures among the earlier generation of seventeenth century natural philosophers, including Pierre Gassendi, Henry More, and Newton’s own teacher Isaac Barrow. The absolutism of Newton’s contemporary and friend, John Locke, has received much less attention, which is unfortunate for several reasons. First, Locke’s views of space and time undergo a (...)
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  15. Sobre conocimiento y significado en el Essay de John Locke.Giannina Burlando - 2013 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 29:119-137.
  16. The Utopianism of John Locke's Natural Learning.Zelia Gregoriou & Marianna Papastephanou - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (1):18 - 30.
    This article focuses on John Locke's understanding of the student as a natural learner and on the ambiguous utopia of childhood that underpins this understanding. It draws a parallel between the educational utopia of natural learning and colonization, and then investigates ethico-political implications. Locke politicizes natural learning in ways that normalize exclusions at the level of intersubjective ethical relations and naturalize colonial expansion at the level of cosmopolitan right. Thought through to its implications, this claim leads to exploring connections between (...)
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  17. Lockean Social Epistemology.Lisa McNulty - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):524-536.
    Locke's reputation as a sceptic regarding testimony, and the resultant mockery by epistemologists with social inclinations, is well known. In particular Michael Welbourne, in his article ‘The Community of Knowledge’ (1981), depicts Lockean epistemology as fundamentally opposed to a social conception of knowledge, claiming that he ‘could not even conceive of the possibility of a community of knowledge’. This interpretation of Locke is flawed. Whilst Locke does not grant the honorific ‘knowledge’ to anything short of certainty, he nonetheless held what (...)
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  18. Epistemologiczny Antropocentryzm Locke'a.Dawid Misztal - 2013 - Diametros 37:107-126.
    Odczytywanie filozoficznego przedsięwzięcia Locke’a przede wszystkim jako krytyki kartezjańskiego natywizmu przysłania zwykle napięcia, jakimi obciążona jest myśl Anglika, oraz skutkuje przemilczeniem sporej części stojących za nią motywów. Choć nie zamierzam w prezentowanym tekście całkowicie zerwać z tą popularną wykładnią, chciałbym zaproponować ujęcie wolne od właściwych jej uproszczeń. Dzięki temu możliwe będzie ukazanie złożoności stosunku filozofii Locke’a do podstawowych idei natywizmu, wydobycie sprzecznych interesów, które Locke chciałby dzięki swojej refleksji pogodzić, oraz zasygnalizowanie w zakończeniu znaczenia wypracowanych przez niego rozwiązań dla późniejszych (...)
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  19. John Locke'da Dini İnancın Rasyonalitesi.Tahsin Ölmez - 2013 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):181-197.
    İnsanın inanç oluştururken geçtiği safhaların epistemik yönden doğrulanabilirliği konusundaki tartışmalar düşünce tarihinin ilk zamanlarından bu yana devam ede gelmiştir. İnanç elde ederken deliller ve iradenin ne kadar rolün olduğu veya olması gerektiği konuları “İnanç Ahlakı” başlığı altında tartışılmaktadır. Delilcilik konusundaki tartışmalara John Locke’un eserlerinde de rastlanmaktadır. Epistemolojisini ve dolayısıyla da inanç anlayışını olabildiğince sağlam bir temele oturtmak isteyen Locke, yetersiz delile binaen bir şeye inanmayı veya inancımızı elimizdeki delillerin gücüne göre orantılı tutmamayı bize verilen yetilere karşı bir hakaret olduğunu söylemiştir. (...)
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  20. Locke’s Experimental Philosophy: Peter R. Anstey: John Locke and Natural Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 256pp, $65 HB.Matthew Stuart, Keith Campbell, Michael Jacovides & Peter Anstey - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):1-22.
    Serious philosophical reflection on the nature of experiment began in earnest in the seventeenth century. This paper expounds the most influential philosophy of experiment in seventeenth-century England, the Bacon-Boyle-Hooke view of experiment. It is argued that this can only be understood in the context of the new experimental philosophy practised according to the Baconian theory of natural history. The distinctive typology of experiments of this view is discussed, as well as its account of the relation between experiment and theory. This (...)
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  21. Locke and Original Sin.Aderemi Artis - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:201-219.
  22. Teaching Experience to Read and Write: Locke's Epistemological Subject and the Politics of Baconian Reform.Andrew Barnaby - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:45-83.
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  23. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Sorana Corneanu - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Regimens of the Mind_, Sorana Corneanu proposes a new approach to the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the leading experimental philosophers of seventeenth-century England, an approach that considers their often overlooked moral, psychological, and theological elements. Corneanu focuses on the views about the pursuit of knowledge in the writings of Robert Boyle and John Locke, as well as in those of several of their influences, including Francis Bacon and the early Royal Society virtuosi. She argues that their experimental programs (...)
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  24. John Locke & Natural Philosophy (Review).Antonia LoLordo - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):296-297.
  25. Regimens of the Mind. Boyle, Locke and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Vivian Nutton - 2012 - Annals of Science (4):1-2.
  26. Real Repugnance and Our Ignorance of Things-in-Themselves: A Lockean Problem in Kant and Hegel.Andrew Chignell - 2011 - Internationales Jahrbuch des Deutschen Idealismus 7:135-159.
    Kant holds that in order to have knowledge of an object, a subject must be able to “prove” that the object is really possible—i.e., prove that there is neither logical inconsistency nor “real repugnance” between its properties. This is (usually) easy to do with respect to empirical objects, but (usually) impossible to do with respect to particular things-in-themselves. In the first section of the paper I argue that an important predecessor of Kant’s account of our ignorance of real possibility can (...)
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  27. Locke's Theory Knowledge and its Historical Relations.James Gibson - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke is probably one of the highest-regarded English philosophers, and the first of the British empiricists. His ideas on the mind and consciousness have continued to resonate throughout philosophy and philosophical thought ever since An Essay Concerning Human Understanding first appeared in 1690. James Gibson's Locke's Theory of Knowledge and its Historical Relations was first published in 1917, and saw its fourth reprinting in 1968. Here, it is made available for the first time in paperback. This hugely detailed work (...)
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  28. Material Unity and Natural Organism in Locke.Jennifer Mensch - 2010 - Idealistic Studies 40 (1-2):147-162.
    This paper examines one of the central complaints regarding Locke’s Essay, namely, its supposed incoherence. The question is whether Locke can successfully maintain a materialistic conception of matter, while advancing a theory of knowledge that will constrain the possibilities for a cognitive accessto matter from the start. In approaching this question I concentrate on Locke’s account of unity. While material unity can be described in relation to Locke’s account of substance, real essence, and nominal essence, a separate discussion will be (...)
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  29. Conhecimento testemunhal – A visão não reducionista.Felipe De Mattos Müller - 2010 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 55 (2):126-143.
    In this essay we consider the possibility of knowledge being transferred or transmitted via testimony. Initially, we present an introduction to the epistemology of testimony, by indicating their origin in a tradition that has John Locke, David Hume and Thomas Reid as their representatives. We present a version of the non-reductionist thesis. We show that the non-reductionist about knowledge must request from the speaker a testimonial epistemic performance that is truth conductive, as well as intellectual integrity from the listener.
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  30. Embodied Empiricism.Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - In Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. Springer. pp. 1--6.
    This is the introduction to a collection of essays on 'embodied empiricism' in early modern philosophy and the life sciences - papers on Harvey, Glisson, Locke, Hume, Bonnet, Lamarck, on anatomy and physiology, on medicine and natural history, etc.
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  31. The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science.Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.) - 2010 - Springer.
  32. Branching Off: The Early Moderns in Quest for the Unity of Knowledge.Vlad Alexandrescu (ed.) - 2009 - Bucharest: Zeta Books.
    As Francis Bacon put it on the frontispiece of his Novum Organum, grafting an apocalyptic vision on a research program, multi pertransibunt et multiplex erit scientia. The development of science becomes steadily associated with the end of earthly life, a theme that would resound deeply in Western thought up until Goethe’s Faust. What grounds then the multiplicity of knowledge? What is the common trunk out of which all realms of knowledge unfold, like the burgeoning branches of the celebrated tree? After (...)
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  33. The Role of Natural Philosophy in the Development of Locke's Empiricism.Stephen Gaukroger - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):55 – 83.
    (2009). The Role of Natural Philosophy in the Development of Locke's Empiricism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 55-83.
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  34. Locke on Testimony: A Reexamination.Joseph Shieber - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):21 - 41.
    In this paper I focus on John Locke as a representative figure of English Enlightenment theorizing about the legitimacy of cognitive authority and examine the way in which a greater attention to the cultural milieu in which Locke worked can lead to a profound reexamination of his writings on cognitive authority. In particular, I suggest that an inattention to the rise of a culture of reading and the growing availability of books in Early Modern England has led historians of philosophy (...)
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  35. Locke on Knowledge and the Cognitive Act.Maria van der Schaar - 2009 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 78 (1):1-15.
    The first half of the paper gives an interpretation of Locke's concept of knowledge, which shows that Aristotelian ideas and later scholasticism has had some influence on Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The second half of the paper shows the uniqueness of Locke's account of knowledge by contrasting it with the standard account of knowledge as justified true belief. The most important point is that knowledge, for Locke, is primarily an act, not a state.
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  36. Kant's Transcendental Idealism and the Limits of Knowledge : Kant's Alternative to Locke's Physiology.Paul Guyer - 2008 - In Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press. pp. 79-99.
  37. Vladimír Manda: The Epistemology of John Locke.J. Hargašová - 2008 - Filozofia 63:200-201.
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  38. Locke’s Problem Concerning Perceptual Error.Antonia Lolordo - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):705-724.
    Locke claims that we have sensitive knowledge of the external world, in virtue of the fact that simple ideas are real, true, and adequate. However, despite his dismissive remarks about Cartesian external-world skepticism, Locke gives us little to go on as to how knowledge of the external world survives the fact of perceptual error, or even how perceptual error is possible. I argue that Locke has an in-principle problem explaining perceptual error.
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  39. Locke: An Empiricist?Terence Moore - 2008 - Think 7 (20):97-104.
    Terence Moore explains why Locke is perhaps not quite the many suppose him to be.
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  40. Locke on Faith and Reason.Nicholas Jolley - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
  41. Berkeley's Idealism: Critique of John Locke's Epistemology.M. A. Kanu - 2007 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (2).
  42. Continuity and Change in the Empiricism of John Locke and Gerardus de Vries (1648–1705).Paul Schuurman - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):292-304.
    Locke has often been hailed as the father of an empiricism that provided a philosophical basis to natural science in the Age of Enlightenment. In this article his empiricism is compared with that of the little known Dutch Aristotelian professor Gerardus de Vries. There are striking parallels between Locke's brand of mechanist empiricism and the pragmatic and flexible Aristotelianism of De Vries. These parallels put strictures on both the archaic character of the Aristotelianism embraced by De Vries and on the (...)
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  43. Lockean Primary Quality Perception Reconstructed.R. Matthew Shockey - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (3):221 - 235.
    With the exception of solidity, Locke's list of primary qualities matches his list of ideas of "divers senses," that is, ideas that are perceived in multiple sensory modalities. I argue that for these ideas, the fact that they are robust in our sensory experience in a way that single-modality ideas are not provides the main reason for taking them to be ideas of primary qualities. Solidity, however, is taken as primary because it is ineliminable from experience in a way that (...)
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  44. Reconciling Locke’s Definition of Knowledge with Knowing Reality.Benjamin Hill - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):91-105.
    A common criticism of Locke’s ideational definition of knowledge is that it contradicts his accounts of knowledge’s reality and sensitive knowledge. Here it is argued that the ideational definiton of knowledge is compatible with knowledge of idea-independent reality. The key is Locke’s notion of the signification. Nominal agreements obtain if and only if the ideas’ descriptive contents are the ground for truth; real agreements obtain only if their total denotation are the grounds for truth. The signification of the ideas determine (...)
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  45. John Locke and the Problems of Moral Knowledge.Mark D. Mathewson - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):509–526.
    In this paper, I argue that John Locke's account of knowledge coupled with his commitments to moral ideas being voluntary constructions of our own minds and to divine voluntarism (moral rules are given by God according to his will) leads to a seriously flawed view of moral knowledge. After explicating Locke's view of moral knowledge, highlighting the specific problems that seem to arise from it, and suggesting some possible Lockean responses, I conclude that the best Locke can do is give (...)
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  46. A Survey of British Epistemology.Ray Scott Percival - 2006 - In Anthony Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.), Continuum Encyclopaedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum. pp. 999-1007.
  47. Review of Ellis, Fiona, Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley[REVIEW]Robert Stern - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
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  48. Boyle and Locke on Observation, Testimony, Demonstration and Experience.J. J. MacIntosh - 2005 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):275-288.
    In Warranted Christian Beliet Alvin Plantinga claims that “The Enlightenment looked askance at testimony and tradition; Locke saw them as a preeminent source of error.” Locke, Plantinga suggests, is the “fountainhead” of this stance. This is importantly wrong about Locke and Locke”s views, and an examination of the views of Locke’s much admired friend and slightly older contemporary, Robert Boyle, reveals that the claim is mistaken about him as well, reinforcing the view that Plantinga is in general mistaken about the (...)
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  49. Locke’s Account of Natural Philosophy.David Soles - 2005 - Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):1-23.
  50. General Ideas and the Knowability of Essence: Interpretations of Locke's Theory of Knowledge.Maurilio Lovatti - 2004 - Dissertation, Oxford, Tercentenary John Locke Conference (April 2-4, 2004)
    Widespread amongst scholars is the legend according to which Locke shows a strong aversion to abstract ideas, similar to that of Berkley in the Treatise. This legend is endorsed by influential commentators on Locke. He does not even propose the reduction of ideas to mental pictures (a reduction which in Berkeley and Hume will form the base of the negation of the existence of abstract ideas in the mind). Locke is not in the least afraid of abstract ideas; his constant (...)
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