This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

46 found
Order:
  1. Locke Versus Hobbes in Gauthier's Ethics.Richard J. Arneson - 1987 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):295 – 316.
  2. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On Personal Identity and Responsibility.Simon Beck - 2013 - South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):1-9.
    The psychological continuity theory of personal identity has recently been accused of not meeting what is claimed to be a fundamental requirement on theories of identity - to explain personal moral responsibility. Although they often have much to say about responsibility, the charge is that they cannot say enough. I set out the background to the charge with a short discussion of Locke and the requirement to explain responsibility, then illustrate the accusation facing the theory with details from Marya Schechtman. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. Encyclopedia of Ethics, 2nd Edition.Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte Becker (eds.) - 2001 - Routledge.
    The editors, working with a team of 325 renowned authorities in the field of ethics, have revised, expanded, and updated this classic encyclopedia. Along with the addition of 150 new entries, all of the original articles have been newly peer-reviewed and revised, bibliographies have been updated throughout, and the overall design of the work has been enhanced for easier access to cross-references and other reference features. New entries include * Aristotelian Ethics * Avicenna * Bad Faith * Beneficence * Categorical (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.Ruth Boeker - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):105-135.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. The Moral Dimension in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3):229-247.
    I offer an interpretation of John Locke’s account of persons and personal identity that gives full credit to Locke’s claim that “person” is a forensic term, sheds new light on the relation between Locke’s characterizations of a person in sections 9 and 26, and explains how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. I show that Locke’s claim that sameness of consciousness is necessary for personal identity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Expérience Et Raison. Les Fondements de la Morale Selon Locke Jean-Michel Vienne Collection «Bibliothèque d'Histoire de la Philosophie» Paris, Vrin, 1991, 298 P. [REVIEW]Gilbert Boss - 1994 - Dialogue 33 (01):158-.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. A Woman's Influence? John Locke and Damaris Masham on Moral Accountability.Jacqueline Broad - 2006 - Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):489-510.
    Some scholars suggest that John Locke’s revisions to the chapter “Of Power” for the 1694 second edition of his Essay concerning Human Understanding may be indebted to the Cambridge Platonist, Ralph Cudworth. Their claims rest on evidence that Locke may have had access to Cudworth’s unpublished manuscript treatises on free will. In this paper, I examine an alternative suggestion – the claim that Cudworth’s daughter, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and not Cudworth himself, may have exerted an influence on Locke’s revisions. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. John Locke and Utilitarianism.A. P. Brogan - 1958 - Ethics 69 (2):79-93.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Locke as Moral Sceptic: Innateness, Diversity, and the Reply to Stoicism.Daniel Carey - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (3):292-309.
  10. Fractured Foundations: The Contradiction Between Locke's Ontology and His Moral Philosophy.Paul R. Dehart - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:111-148.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. La Morale di Locke: Fra Prudenza E Mediocritas.Giuliana Di Biase - 2012 - Carocci.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. John Locke's Theory of Moral Consensus.Robert Ehman - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):131-132.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Métaphysique et morale de Descartes à Kant.Léo Freuler - 1998 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2:219-236.
  14. Why Locke Rejected an Ethics of Virtue and Turned to an Ethics of Utility.John P. Hittinger - 1990 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 64:267-276.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  16. Contemporary Contractarian Moral Theory.Hugh LaFollette - unknown
    Contractarianism, as a general approach to moral and political thought, has had a long and distinguished history -- its roots are easily traced as far back as Plato's Republic, where Glaucon advanced it as a view of justice, and its influential representatives include Pufendorf, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, and Kant. In various ways, to various purposes, and against the background of various assumptions, each of these philosophers offered contractarian arguments for the views they defended. What binds the tradition together, in (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. The Moral and Political Philosophy of John Locke.Sterling Power Lamprecht - 1962 - New York: Russell & Russell.
  18. Reply to Rickless.Antonia LoLordo - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:53-62.
  19. Locke's Moral Man.Antonia LoLordo - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Antonia Lolordo presents an original interpretation of John Locke's metaphysics of moral agency, in which to be a moral agent is simply to be free, rational, and a person.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  20. Tradition and Prudence in Locke's Exceptions to Toleration.David J. Lorenzo - 2003 - American Journal of Political Science 47 (2):248-58.
    Why did Locke exclude Catholics and atheists from toleration? Not, I contend, because he was trapped by his context, but because his prudential approach and practica ljudgments led him to traditiona ltexts. I make this argumentfirst by outlining the connections among prudential exceptionality, practical judgments, and traditional texts. I then describe important continuities betweenc onventional English understandings of the relationship between state and religion and Locke's writings on toleration, discuss Locke's conception of rights, and illustrate his use of prudential exceptions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. John Locke on Passion, Will and Belief.Michael Losonsky - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (2):267 – 283.
  22. Lazy Lethargy and Fullness of Joy: Locke on Desire and Happiness.Hans Lottenbach - 2009 - Locke Studies 9:97-122.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Naturrecht Ohne Grundsatz? John Locke Über Die "Reasonableness of Morality".Bernd Ludwig - 2004 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 12.
    At the latest following Pufendorf's Jus naturae et gentium , the attempt to develop natural law out of one basic principle is prominent. Although John Locke characterizes Pufendorf's natural law as worthy of emulation and his own Treatises of Government reveal obvious traces of Pufendorf's ideas, still one fails to find any influence by the "basic-principle idea." Furthermore, Locke never explicates the mathematically demonstrative principle for law and morals, which he introduced in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding . Locke, however, (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Lockean Empathy.Colin Marshall - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):87-106.
    This paper offers an epistemic defense of empathy, drawing on John Locke's theory of ideas. Locke held that ideas of shape, unlike ideas of color, had a distinctive value: resembling qualities in their objects. I argue that the same is true of empathy, as when someone is pained by someone's pain. This means that empathy has the same epistemic value or objectivity that Locke and other early modern philosophers assigned to veridical perceptions of shape. For this to hold, pain and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. John Locke and the Problems of Moral Knowledge.Mark D. Mathewson - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):509–526.
    In this paper, I argue that John Locke's account of knowledge coupled with his commitments to moral ideas being voluntary constructions of our own minds and to divine voluntarism (moral rules are given by God according to his will) leads to a seriously flawed view of moral knowledge. After explicating Locke's view of moral knowledge, highlighting the specific problems that seem to arise from it, and suggesting some possible Lockean responses, I conclude that the best Locke can do is give (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Moral Science and the Concept of Persons in Locke.Ruth Mattern - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (1):24-45.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Personal Identity and Moral Responsibility.S. Mendus - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
  28. John Locke's Four Freedoms Seen in a New Light.Henry Moulds - 1960 - Ethics 71 (2):121-126.
  29. Aspects of Stoicism in Locke's Philosophy.Victor Nuovo - 2011 - In V. Nuovo (ed.), Christianity, Antiquity, and Enlightenment: Interpretations of Locke. Springer.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Ethics and Epistemology in John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. [REVIEW]P. L. S. - 1937 - Journal of Philosophy 34 (24):666-667.
  31. 8 Locke's Moral Philosophy.J. B. Schneewind - 1994 - In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. pp. 199.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Locke,'the Father of Modernity? A Discussion of Wolterstorff's John Locke and the Ethics of Belief.Pa Schouls - 1996 - Philosophia Reformata 61 (2):175-195.
    Locke was the first to develop with profundity and defend the thesis that we are all responsible for our believings, and that to do one’s duty with respect to one’s believings one must, at appropriate junctures and in appropriate ways, listen to the voice of Reason. Reason must be one’s guide. Locke had forebears and cohorts in this line of thought; I want not only to concede but to insist on this. Nonetheless, Locke was the great genius behind our modern (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Looking for Locke? Rawl's Early Humeanism, Selective Kantianism and Roundabout Lockianism.S. Adam Seagrave - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:113-138.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The Extent of Catharine Cockburn's Lockeanism in Her.Patricia Sheridan - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3).
    : This essay examines Catharine Cockburn's moral philosophy as it is developed in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay on Human Understanding. In this work, Cockburn argues that Locke's epistemological principles provide a foundation for the knowledge of natural law. Sheridan suggests that Cockburn's objective in defending Locke's moral epistemology was conditioned by her own prior commitment to a significantly un-Lockean theory of morality. In exploring Cockburn's views on morality in terms of their divergence from Locke's, the author hopes to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. John Locke and the Problem of Depravity.W. M. Spellman - 1988 - Clarendon Press.
    Closely examining Locke's view of original sin and its consequences for education in the early Enlightenment, Spellman here argues that Locke was much closer to traditional Protestant teaching than is generally recognized, and challenges the interpretation that sees Locke as advocating, through his philosophical and educational writings, the perfectibility of humankind.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Locke, the Law of Nature, and Polygamy.Susanne Sreedhar & Julie Walsh - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (1):91-110.
    When Locke mentions polygamy in his writings, he does not condemn the practice and, even seems to endorse it under certain conditions. This attitude is out of step with many of his contemporaries. Identifying the philosophical reasons that lead Locke to have this attitude about polygamy motivates our project. Because Locke never wrote a treatise on ethics, we look to number of different texts, but focus on An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Essays on the Law of Nature, in order (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Waldron's Locke and Locke's Waldron: A Review of Jeremy Waldron's God, Locke, and Equality. [REVIEW]Nomi M. Stolzenberg & Gideon Yaffe - 2006 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):186 – 216.
  38. Lockean Aesthetics.Dabney Townsend - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (4):349-361.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Book Review:John Locke's Moral Philosophy. John Colman. [REVIEW]James Tully - 1984 - Ethics 94 (3):536-.
  40. Aquinas Versus Locke and Descartes on the Human Person and End-of-Life Ethics.Stan Wallace - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):319-330.
  41. Locke on the Power to Suspend.Julie Walsh - 2014 - Locke Studies 14:121-157.
    My aim in this paper is to determine how Locke understands suspension and the role it plays in his view of human liberty. To this end I, 1) discuss the deficiencies of the first edition version of ‘Of Power’ and why Locke needed to include the ability to suspend in the second edition, then 2) analyze Locke’s definitions of the power to suspend with a focus on his use of the terms ‘source’, ‘hinge’, and ‘inlet’ to describe the power. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Locke’s Ethics.Julie Walsh - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Locke: Ethics The major writings of John Locke are among the most important texts for understanding some of the central currents in epistemology, metaphysics, politics, religion, and pedagogy in the late 17th and early 18th century in Western Europe. His magnum opus, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is the undeniable starting point for … Continue reading Locke’s Ethics →.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Locke on Punishment, Property and Moral Knowledge.Lee Ward - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (2):218-244.
    Locke's admittedly 'very strange' sounding doctrine of natural executive power, according to which the individual has the right to execute the law of nature, has long been one of the most controversial features of his moral philosophy. In contrast to the many commentators who deny its theoretical innovation and challenge its individualist premises, this study proposes that the philosophical significance of Locke's natural right to punish derives from its critical departure from earlier moral and political theory. It also argues that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. The Moral Epistemology of Locke's Essay.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Locke on Suicide.George Windstrup - 1980 - Political Theory 8 (2):169-182.