This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

33 found
Order:
  1. added 2019-01-18
    La determinación de la libertad, en John Locke.Cecilia Abdo Ferez - 2018 - Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 30 (58).
    Freedom has no univocal meaning in Locke's work, despite its centrality. It is understood as a duty and right, but also as a power, or, as we will hold here, as a state. The successive modifications of the idea of freedom between An Essay concerning Human Understanding and Two Treatises of Government, between the editions and in relation to early or later texts, such as The Reasonableness of Christianity, allow us to think of freedom as a problem, rather than as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2018-10-14
    Divine Foreknowledge, Rational Determinism, and the Value of Freedom.Andrea Guardo - manuscript
    After having given in the Essay a definition of freedom which straightforwardly entails its compatibility with – among other things – God's foreknowledge, Locke surprisingly writes in a 1693 letter to Molyneux that he does not see how human liberty can coexist with divine prescience. I argue that the confession to Molyneux can be made consistent with the Essay's definition by embracing the view that the problem Locke had in mind when he drafted it was not a problem concerning the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2017-11-03
    Locke and Leibniz on Freedom and Necessity.Idan Shimony & Yekutiel Shoham - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für Unser Glück Oder Das Glück Anderer, X. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress. Hildesheim: Georg Olms. pp. Vol. 1, 573-588.
    Locke and Leibniz are often classified as proponents of compatibilist theories of human freedom, since both maintain that freedom is consistent with determinism and that the difference between being and not being free turns on how one is determined. However, we will argue in this paper that their versions of compatibilism are essentially different and that they have significantly distinct commitments to compatibilism. To this end, we will first analyze the definitions and examples for freedom and necessity that Locke and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2017-03-21
    Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2016-12-08
    Locke on the Intellectual Basis of Sin.V. C. Chappell - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):197-207.
    The Essay concerning Human Understanding was published at the end of 1689.1 It sold well, and within three years Locke was planning revisions for a second edition. Among those whose “advice and assistance” he sought was the Irish scientist William Molyneux. Locke had begun a correspondence with Molyneux a few months before, after the latter had lavishly praised the Essay and its author in the Epistle Dedicatory of his own Dioptrica Nova, published early in 1692. Here was a man, Locke (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2016-11-10
    Locke’s Arguments Against the Freedom to Will.Matthew A. Leisinger - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):642-662.
    In sections 2.21.23-25 of An Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke considers and rejects two ways in which we might be “free to will”, which correspond to the Thomistic distinction between freedom of exercise and freedom of specification. In this paper, I examine Locke’s arguments in detail. In the first part, I argue for a non-developmental reading of Locke’s argument against freedom of exercise. Locke’s view throughout all five editions of the Essay is that we do not possess freedom of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2016-06-14
    Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency.Gideon Yaffe - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive interpretation of John Locke's solution to one of philosophy's most enduring problems: free will and the nature of human agency.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. added 2016-06-09
    Odmiany wolności w ujęciu Johna Locke'a.Justyna Trzepizur - 2012 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 60 (2):25-43.
  9. added 2015-10-13
    Gideon Yaffe: Liberty Worth the Name, Locke on Free Agency.V. Nuovo - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):186-191.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2015-07-02
    The Concept of Freedom in Locke.Vladimir Manda - 2013 - Filozofia 68 (2):105-113.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2015-07-02
    Freedom, God, and Empiricism in Locke.Eric Andrew Manchester - 1999 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    In his Epistle to the Reader in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding , John Locke declares moral philosophy and divinity studies to be the two most important areas of human inquiry. However, while he clearly affirms the existence of God in this work, and, debatably, presupposes libertarian freedom in his account of human will and moral responsibility, he never offers a philosophical reconciliation of human freedom and God's existence. Indeed, Locke bemoans his inability to provide such a reconciliation, and admits (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2015-06-03
    Gideon Yaffe, Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency Reviewed By.Nicholas Jolley - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22 (1):73-75.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2015-06-03
    Gideon Yaffe, Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency. [REVIEW]Nicholas Jolley - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22:73-75.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. added 2015-03-25
    Liberdade E Vontade Em Locke.Marília Ferraz - 2009 - Filosofia Unisinos 10 (3):291-301.
    ABSTRACT: This article aims to discuss Locke’s compatibilism, that is, the lokean thesis that freedom is compatible with the natural necessity. To this end, it is analized the chapter Of The Power (XXI, book II of the An Essay concerning Human Understanding), in which Locke clarifi es the concepts of freedom and will. Although Locke, at times, involves himself with the incongruent thesis on compatibilism, he is a compatibilist. The impression that Locke would defend incompatibilists’ theories ends up being abandoned (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2015-03-24
    Locke's Finely Spun Liberty.Jack D. Davidson - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):203 - 227.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. added 2015-03-24
    Locke on the Freedom of Will.Vere Chappell - 1996 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Clarendon Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2015-01-26
    Reply to Rickless.Antonia LoLordo - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:53-62.
  18. added 2014-12-16
    Locke and Wilkins on Inner Sense and Volition.Patrick J. Connolly - 2014 - Locke Studies 14:239-259.
    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate two interesting parallels between views discussed in John Wilkins’ Of the Principles and Duties of Natural Religion and positions developed by John Locke in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The first parallel pertains to a faculty of inner sense. Both authors carve out a central role for this introspective perceptual modality. The second parallel pertains to volition and free will. Both authors employ an investigative methodology which privileges first-personal experiences of choosing and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2014-03-26
    Locke, Suspension of Desire, and the Remote Good.Tito Magri - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):55 – 70.
    The chapter 'Of power' of Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding is a very fine discussion of agency and a very complex piece of philosophy. It is the result of the superimposition of at least three layers of text (those of the first, second and fifth editions of the Essay), expressive of widely differing views of the same matters. The argument concerning agency and free will that it puts forward (as it now stands, reporting Locke's last word on the subject) is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. added 2014-03-22
    Review: Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency. [REVIEW]Vere Chappell - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):420-424.
  21. added 2014-03-17
    Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. Harris puts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22. added 2013-12-30
    Reconciling Human Freedom and Sin: A Note on Locke's Paraphrase.Jk Numao - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:95-112.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2013-08-13
    To Choose or Not to Choose: Locke and Lowe On the Nature and Powers of the Self.Barbara Hannan - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (1):59-73.
    I compare Locke's views on the nature and powers of the self with E. J. Lowe's view, ‘non-Cartesian substance dualism’. Lowe agrees with Locke that persons have a power to choose or not to choose . Lowe takes this power to be non-causal . I argue that this move does not obviously succeed in evading the notorious interaction problem that arises for all forms of substance dualism, including those of Locke and Descartes. However, I am sympathetic to Lowe's attempt to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2013-08-13
    'Things for Actions': Locke's Mistake in 'Of Power'.Julie Walsh - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:85-94.
    In a letter to William Molyneux John Locke states that in reviewing his chapter 'Of Power' for the second edition of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding he noticed that he had made one mistake which, now corrected, has put him "into a new view of things" which will clarify his account of human freedom. Locke says the mistake was putting “things for actions” on p.123 of the first edition, a page on which the word 'things' does not appear (The Correspondence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2013-08-13
    Liberté, compatibilisme et agnosticisme chez Locke.Richard Glauser - 2009 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 107 (4):675-697.
  26. added 2013-08-13
    Locke on the Locked Room.Paul Hoffman - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:57-73.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2013-08-13
    Thinking and Willing in Locke's Theory of Human Freedom.Richard Glauser - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):695-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. added 2013-08-13
    Locke on the Suspension of Desire. Chappell - 1998 - Locke Studies 29:23-38.
    In the first edition of the Essay concerning Human Understanding, Locke claims that human beings have freedom of action - that is, that some of their actions are free - but that they do not have freedom of will - that is, that none of their volitions are free. Volitions themselves are actions for Locke; they are operations of the will and hence acts of willing. And volitions give rise to other actions: an action that follows and is caused by (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. added 2013-08-13
    Locke on the Freedom of the Will.Vere Chappell - 1994 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press. pp. 101--21.
    Locke was a libertarian: he believed in human freedom. To be sure, his conception of freedom was different from that of many philosophers who call themselves libertarians. Some such philosophers maintain that an agent is free only if her action is uncaused; whereas Locke thought that all actions have causes, including the free ones. Some libertarians hold that no action is free unless it proceeds from a volition that is itself free; whereas Locke argued that free volition, as opposed to (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. added 2013-08-13
    Determinism and Freewill: Anthony Collins' a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty: With a Discussion of the Opinions of Hobbes, Locke, Pierre Bayle, William King and Leibniz.Anthony Collins - 1976 - M. Nijhoff.
  31. added 2013-08-13
    Free Will and Four English Philosophers: Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Mill.Joseph Rickaby - 1906 - Freeport, N.Y., Books for Libraries Press.
  32. added 2013-08-12
    Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency Gideon Yaffe Princeton Et Oxford, Princeton University Press, 2000, 200 P.Laura Berchielli - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):811-.
  33. added 2013-08-12
    Locke on the Freedom to Will. Rickless - 2000 - Locke Studies 31:43-68.
    In Book II, Chapter xxi of An essay concerning human understanding, Locke claims that a mind's will is its power 'to order the consideration of any Idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa in any particular instance' (Il. xxi. 5).l To exercise this power (that is, to will), Locke says, is to perform an act of volition (or: willing), volitions being actions of the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation