Related categories

119 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 119
  1. Locke, Accountability and Personal Identity.Adam Abdulla - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:47-50.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Identity and Becoming.Robert Allen - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):527-548.
    A material object is constituted by a sum of parts all of which are essential to the sum but some of which seem inessential to the object itself. Such object/sum of parts pairs include my body/its torso and appendages and my desk/its top, drawers, and legs. In these instances, we are dealing with objects and their components. But, fundamentally, we may also speak, as Locke does, of an object and its constitutive matter—a “mass of particles”—or even of that aggregate and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Margaret Atherton - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):273-293.
  4. Problems From Locke by J. L. Mackie.M. R. Ayers - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (2):71-73.
  5. Primary and Secondary Qualities in Locke's 'Essay'.Michael Ayers - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 136.
  6. Locke: Vol. 1, Epistemology; Vol.2, Ontology.Michael Ayers - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):577-584.
  7. Locke on Personal Identity: The Form of the Self.S. Azeri - 2011 - Filozofia 66:222-239.
    In line with the empiricist project, Locke tries to describe how unconscious encounters with environment yield to the emergence of consciousness. For Locke the self is identical with consciousness and consciousness is accessible empirically. As far as the identity of human is concerned, identity of the self depends on the consciousness of the person. The person is identical to himself to the extent that he is aware of his own perceptions and thinking. The range of the person’s memory sets the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Identité et conscience de soi dans l'Essai de Locke.Étienne Balibar - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):455 - 477.
    Le rapport entre « conscience » et « identité » forme l'un des deux versants de la conception lockienne du sujet (l'autre étant constitué par la « propriété de soi-même »). La théorie lockienne repose sur la distinction du « mental » et du « verbal », et l'isolement du premier comme élément de la vérité. Elle suppose une reformulation du principe d'identité sous la forme d'une double négation inhérente à l'esprit (Mind) : il est impossible que l'homme ne sache (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. On Earth As It Is in Heaven: Trinitarian Influences on Locke's Account of Personal Identity.John Barresi - 2006 - The Pluralist 1 (1):110 - 128.
    Locke’s concepts of person and self as they first appeared in the 1694 essay were not original to him but had already appeared in the Trinitarian controversy in England in the early 1690s. In particular, William Sherlock, who in 1690 argued that the Trinity might be understood as composed of three distinct self-conscious minds or persons in one God, previously used not only concepts but also phrases that Locke used in his definition of person. Both Sherlock and Locke defined person (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Leibniz, Locke and I.Simon Beck - 1999 - Cogito 13 (3):181-187.
  11. Locke on Persons and Personal Identity.David P. Behan - 1979 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):53 - 75.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12. Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):407-434.
    john locke argues that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness, and he maintains that any other theory of personal identity would lead to "great Absurdities".1 This statement intimates that Locke thought carefully about alternative conceptions of personal identity and their problems. In this paper, I argue that, by understanding Locke's account of personal identity in the context of metaphysical and religious debates of his time, especially debates concerning the afterlife and the state of the soul between death and resurrection, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. The Role of Appropriation in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2016 - Locke Studies 16:3–39.
    According to Locke, appropriation is a precondition for moral responsibility and thus we can expect that it plays a distinctive role in his theory. Yet it is rare to find an interpretation of Locke’s account of appropriation that does not associate it with serious problems. To make room for a more satisfying understanding of Locke’s account of appropriation we have to analyse why it was so widely misunderstood. The aim of this paper is fourfold: First, I will show that Mackie’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.Ruth Boeker - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):105-135.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Moral Dimension in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3):229-247.
    I offer an interpretation of John Locke’s account of persons and personal identity that gives full credit to Locke’s claim that “person” is a forensic term, sheds new light on the relation between Locke’s characterizations of a person in sections 9 and 26, and explains how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. I show that Locke’s claim that sameness of consciousness is necessary for personal identity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. John Locke: Identity, Persons, and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2013 - Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
    John Locke offered a very rich and influential account of persons and personal identity in “Of Identity and Diversity,” which is chapter 27 of Book 2 of his An Essay concerning Human Understanding. He added it to the second edition in 1694 upon the recommendation of his friend William Molyneux. Locke’s theory was soon after its publication discussed by his contemporaries and has influenced many present-day discussions of personal identity. Distinctive about Locke’s theory is that he argues that the notion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. John Locke on Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - unknown
    John Locke claims both that ‘person’ is a forensic term and that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness. The aim of my dissertation is to explain and critically assess how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. My interpretation of Locke’s account of persons and personal identity is embedded in Locke’s sortal-dependent account of identity. Locke’s sortal-dependent account of identity provides an important theoretical framework for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Locke on Personal Identity: Consciousness and Concernment. [REVIEW]Ruth Boeker - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):803-6.
  20. „personal Identity“ Bei John Locke.Reinhard Brandt - 2005 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 13.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Locke's Doctrine of Substantial Identity & Diversity.C. D. Broad - 1951 - Theoria 17 (1-3):13-26.
  22. Locke on the Identity of Persons.Baruch Brody - 1972 - American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (4):327 - 334.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. A Critical Analysis of John Locke's Criterion of Personal Identity.A. Chakraborty - 1996 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3-4):349-362.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Shoemaker's Arguments Against Locke.Hugh S. Chandler - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):263-265.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Locke.Vere Chappell (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This new volume in the successful Oxford Readings in Philosophy series presents a selection of the best recent articles on the main topics in Locke's philosophy. These include: innate ideas, ideas and perception, primary and secondary qualities, free will, substance, personal identity, language, essence, knowledge, and belief. The authors include some of the world's leading Locke scholars, and their essays exemplify the best - and most accessible - recent scholarship on Locke, making the volume essential for students and specialists.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Locke and Relative Identity.Vere Chappell - 1989 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1):69 - 83.
    LOCKE'S DISCUSSION OF ORGANISMS AND PERSONS IN "ESSAY" II.XXVI HAS LED GEACH AND OTHERS TO ATTRIBUTE THE THESIS OF RELATIVE IDENTITY TO HIM; THAT X IS NEVER IDENTICAL WITH Y "TOUT COURT" BUT ONLY RELATIVE TO SOME SORTAL PROPERTY F: X IS THE SAME F AS Y. I ARGUE THAT THIS ATTRIBUTION RESTS ON A MISUNDERSTANDING OF LOCKE'S POSITION. LOCKE INDEED HOLDS THAT AN OLD TREE MAY BE THE SAME OAK AS THE SEEDLING FROM WHICH IT GREW, WHEREAS THE PARTICLES (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  27. Locke on Personal Identity: A Criticism of One Interpretation.P. Cicovacki - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:57.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Locke on Essence and Identity.Christopher Hughes Conn - 2003 - Kluwer.
    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the relationship between Locke's anti-essentialism and his theory of identity. Subsequent to developing these theories in chapters one and two, I argue that the organisms and persons in Locke's ontology must have both spatial and temporal extent, since he takes them to be diachronically compounded out of shorter-lived, successively existing substances. In chapter four I defend this interpretation by arguing, first, that Locke could have entertained a four-dimensional account of physical objects, and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Locke's Organismic Theory of Personal Identity.Christopher Hughes Conn - 2002 - Locke Studies 2:105-135.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Consciousness as a Guide to Personal Persistence.Barry Dainton & Tim Bayne - 2005 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (4):549-571.
    Mentalistic (or Lockean) accounts of personal identity are normally formulated in terms of causal relations between psychological states such as beliefs, memories, and intentions. In this paper we develop an alternative (but still Lockean) account of personal identity, based on phenomenal relations between experiences. We begin by examining a notorious puzzle case due to Bernard Williams, and extract two lessons from it: first, that Williams's puzzle can be defused by distinguishing between the psychological and phenomenal approaches, second, that so far (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  31. Locke's Principle is an Applicable Criterion of Identity.Rafael De Clercq - 2013 - Noûs 47 (4):697-705.
    According to Locke’s Principle, material objects are identical if and only if they are of the same kind and once occupy the same place at the same time. There is disagreement about whether this principle is true, but what is seldom disputed is that, even if true, the principle fails to constitute an applicable criterion of identity. In this paper, I take issue with two arguments that have been offered in support of this claim by arguing (i) that we can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. A Criterion of Diachronic Identity Based on Locke's Principle.Rafael De Clercq - 2005 - Metaphysica 6 (1):23-38.
    The aim of this paper is to derive a perfectly general criterion of identity through time from Locke’s Principle, which says that two things of the same kind cannot occupy the same space at the same time. In this way, the paper pursues a suggestion made by Peter F. Strawson almost thirty years ago in an article called ‘Entity and Identity’. The reason why the potential of this suggestion has so far remained unrealized is twofold: firstly, the suggestion was never (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33. In Defence of Locke's Principle: A Reply to Peter M. Simons.Frederick Doepke - 1986 - Mind 95 (378):238-241.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  34. Hume and Locke on Personal Identity.Antony Eagle - unknown
    • But this is not all: since organisms differ from aggregates (maybe tables do too?). The difference: organisation, indeed, organisation that constitutes ‘vegetable life’.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Locke on Ideas, 'Substratum' and the Identity of Persons.Viorica Iby Farkas - 1982 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    Chapters I-III constitute preliminaries for Chapter IV. In Chapter I, I argue that though it is generally assumed that the different things Locke says about ideas cannot be reconciled with each other, this view is mistaken. Locke gives a functionalist account of the nature of ideas; he is vague rather than confused; and, the vagueness is intended to suggest recognized ignorance about the nature of ideas. This chapter also contains the general outlines of Locke's account of the formation of our (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Locke and Personal Identity--Again.A. Flew - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:33.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Locke and the Problem of Personal Identity.Antony Flew - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (96):53 - 68.
    Locke's contribution to the discussion was fourfold: First , he saw the importance of the problem; Second , he realized that the puzzle cases, the “strange suppositions,” were relevant; Third , he maintained “same” had a different meaning when applied to “person” from its meaning in other contexts; and, Fourth , he offered his much criticized solution of the problem.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. IDENTITÉ ET RELATION: Locke et les qualités de troisième espèce.Denis Forest - 1999 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 189 (4):467 - 479.
    La liste des qualités inclut chez Locke une troisième espèce, celle de qualités qu'on attribue aux corps du fait de leur effet perceptible sur des corps tiers. De telles qualités pourraient être analysées comme des propriétés dispositionnelles. Elles tirent leur importance de ceci que leur concept oblige à reconsidérer la question des rapports entre entités et relations. Comme le montre une science comme la chimie, ce sont souvent les relations qui nous renseignent le mieux sur l'identité des agents naturels. De (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy.Joanna K. Forstrom - 2010 - Continuum.
    Introduction -- John Locke and the problem of personal identity : the principium individuationis, personal immortality, and bodily resurrection -- On separation and immortality : Descartes and the nature of the soul -- On materialism and immortality or Hobbes' rejection of the natural argument for the immortality of the soul -- Henry More and John Locke on the dangers of materialism : immateriality, immortality, immorality, and identity -- Robert Boyle : on seeds, cannibalism, and the resurrection of the body -- (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Locke and the Scriblerians Identity and Consciousness in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain.Christopher Fox - 1988
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41. The Same Self.R. Gallie - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:45.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Locke on Personal Identity, Consciousness, and “Fatal Errors”.Don Garrett - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):95-125.
  43. Locke on the Ontology of Persons.Jessica Gordon-Roth - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):97-123.
    The importance of John Locke's discussion of persons is undeniable. Locke never explicitly tells us whether he thinks persons are substances or modes, however. We are thus left in the dark about a fundamental aspect of Locke's view. Many commentators have recently claimed that Lockean persons are modes. In this paper I swim against the current tide in the secondary literature and argue that Lockean persons are substances. Specifically I argue that what Locke says about substance, power, and agency commits (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44. Locke's Place‐Time‐Kind Principle.Jessica Gordon‐Roth - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (4):264-274.
    John Locke discusses the notions of identity and diversity in Book 2, Chapter 27 of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. At the beginning of this much-discussed chapter, Locke posits the place-time-kind principle. According to this principle, no two things of the same kind can be in the same place at the same time . Just what Locke means by this is unclear, however. So too is whether this principle causes problems for Locke, and whether these problems can be resolved. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Did Locke Defend the Memory Continuity Criterion of Personal Identity?Johan E. Gustafsson - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:113-129.
    John Locke’s account of personal identity is usually thought to have been proved false by Thomas Reid’s simple ‘Gallant Officer’ argument. Locke is traditionally interpreted as holding that your having memories of a past person’s thoughts or actions is necessary and sufficient for your being identical to that person. This paper argues that the traditional memory interpretation of Locke’s account is mistaken and defends a memory continuity view according to which a sequence of overlapping memories is necessary and sufficient for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  46. Hume's Use of Locke on Identity.R. Hall - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:56.
  47. Problems From Locke.Gerald Hanratty - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 25:387-389.
  48. John Locke's Puzzle Cases About Personal Identity.P. Helm - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Locke's Conditions for Personal Identity.P. Helm - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Paul Helm - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (208):173 - 185.
    It is widely held that Locke propounded a theory of personal identity in terms of consciousness and memory. By ‘theory’ here is meant a set of necessary and sufficient conditions indicating what personal identity consists in. It is also held that this theory is open to obvious and damaging objections, so much so that it has to be supplemented in terms of bodily continuity, either because memory alone is not sufficient, or because the concept of memory is itself dependent upon (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 119