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  1. Locke and Hume on Competing Miracles.Nathan Rockwood - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-15.
    Christian apologists argue that the testimony of the miracles of Jesus provide evidence for Christianity. Hume tries to undermine this argument by pointing out that miracles are said to occur in other religious traditions and so miracles do not give us reason to believe in Christianity over the alternatives. Thus, competing miracles act as an undercutting defeater for the argument from miracles for Christianity. Yet, before Hume, Locke responds to this kind of objection, and in this paper I explain and (...)
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  2. Diego Lucci, John Locke’s Christianity.Remus Gabriel Manoilă - 2023 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):183-186.
  3. Locke on Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Ruth Boeker offers a new perspective on Locke’s account of persons and personal identity by considering it within the context of his broader philosophical project and the philosophical debates of his day. Her interpretation emphasizes the importance of the moral and religious dimensions of his view. By taking seriously Locke’s general approach to questions of identity, Boeker shows that we should consider his account of personhood separately from his account of personal identity over time. On this basis, she argues that (...)
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  4. John Locke's Christianity.Diego Lucci - 2021 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke's religious interests and concerns permeate his philosophical production and are best expressed in his later writings on religion, which represent the culmination of his studies. In this volume, Diego Lucci offers a thorough analysis and reassessment of Locke's unique, heterodox, internally coherent version of Protestant Christianity, which emerges from The Reasonableness of Christianity and other public as well as private texts. In order to clarify Locke's views on morality, salvation, and the afterlife, Lucci critically examines Locke's theistic ethics, (...)
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  5. John Locke’s Christianity: by Diego Lucci, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2021, pp. 260, £75.00 (hb), ISBN: 978-1-108-83691-3.Francesco Quatrini - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (5):967-970.
    Over the past two decades, scholarly attention to Enlightenment studies and especially to the roots of Enlightenment ideas in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries has increased. Against claims t...
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  6. Individuation, Identity, and Resurrection in Thomas Jackson and John Locke.Jon W. Thompson - 2021 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 95 (2):165-194.
    This paper outlines the views of two 17th century thinkers on the question of the metaphysics of resurrection. I show that Jackson and Locke each depart from central 17th century Scholastic convictions regarding resurrection and philosophical anthropology. Each holds that matter or material continuity is not a plausible principle of diachronic individuation for living bodies such as human beings. Despite their rejection of the traditional view, they each provide a defence of the possibility of a personal afterlife. I outline these (...)
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  7. John Locke: The Philosopher as Christian Virtuoso by Victor Nuovo. [REVIEW]Patrick J. Connolly - 2019 - Locke Studies 19.
  8. John Locke: The philosopher as Christian virtuoso. [REVIEW]Andrew Israelsen - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (3):650-652.
    Volume 27, Issue 3, May 2019, Page 650-652.
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  9. Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):407-434.
    john locke argues that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness, and he maintains that any other theory of personal identity would lead to "great Absurdities".1 This statement intimates that Locke thought carefully about alternative conceptions of personal identity and their problems. In this paper, I argue that, by understanding Locke's account of personal identity in the context of metaphysical and religious debates of his time, especially debates concerning the afterlife and the state of the soul between death and resurrection, (...)
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  10. John Locke, ‘Hobbist’: of sleeping souls and thinking matter.Liam P. Dempsey - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):454-476.
    In this paper, I consider Isaac Newton’s fevered accusation that John Locke is a ‘Hobbist.’ I suggest a number of ways in which Locke’s account of the mind–body relation could plausibly be construed as Hobbesian. Whereas Newton conceives of the human mind as an immaterial substance and venerates it as a finite image of the Divine Mind, I argue that Locke utterly deflates the religious, ethical, and metaphysical significance of an immaterial soul. Even stronger, I contend that there is good (...)
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  11. John Locke: The Philosopher as Christian Virtuoso.Victor Nuovo - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Victor Nuovo represents the philosophical thought of John Locke as the work of a Christian virtuoso: an empirical natural philosopher, who was also a practising Christian. Locke believed that the two vocations were not only compatible, but mutually sustaining, and he aspired to unite them in producing a system of Christian philosophy.
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  12. Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.Ruth Boeker - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):105-135.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
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  13. Locke's Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality.Nicholas Jolley - 2015 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Nicholas Jolley shows that the mind-body problem and the nature of personal immortality are more central to Locke's philosophy than has been realized. He argues that Locke takes up unorthodox positions in both cases, and holds that Locke's criticisms of Descartes were controversial responses to challenging metaphysical and theological issues.
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  14. Locke's Solid Souls.D. Kenneth Brown - 2012 - Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (4):228-234.
    John Locke holds that matter is solid, the soul thinks, and for all we know the soul may be a material substance divinely endowed with a power to think. Though he openly admits to nothing stronger than the bare possibility of thinking matter, Locke grants that what thinks in us occupies a definite spatial location to the exclusion of other souls. Solidity is the quality that prevents other things from occupying a spatial location. Locke’s general criterion for identity is spatiotemporal (...)
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  15. Locke on the Irrelevance of the Soul.Anik Waldow - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (3):353-373.
    Commentators usually agree that Locke's discussion of thinking matter is intended to undermine the plausibility of the belief in the existence of the soul. In this paper I argue that, instead of trying to reveal the implausibility of this belief, Locke seeks to rid the concept of the soul of its traditional cognitive and moral functions in order to render references to the soul redundant in philosophical explanations of the nature of human beings and their place in the world. On (...)
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  16. ‘A Compound Wholly Mortal’1: Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality.Liam P. Dempsey - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  17. John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy.Joanna K. Forstrom - 2010 - Continuum.
    Introduction -- John Locke and the problem of personal identity : the principium individuationis, personal immortality, and bodily resurrection -- On separation and immortality : Descartes and the nature of the soul -- On materialism and immortality or Hobbes' rejection of the natural argument for the immortality of the soul -- Henry More and John Locke on the dangers of materialism : immateriality, immortality, immorality, and identity -- Robert Boyle : on seeds, cannibalism, and the resurrection of the body -- (...)
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  18. Il faut parier : Locke ou Pascal?Martine Pécharman - 2010 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 95 (4):479.
    Pascal’s wager was sometimes viewed in the eighteenth-century as an argument conquering its whole demonstrative force not in the Pensées but in a passage of Locke’s Essay Concerning the Human Understanding (II, XXI, § 70) dealing with the preference to be given to a virtuous life when considering the possibility of another eternal life. In this paper, I intend to show that this interpretation is ill-founded. The argument of the wager highlights the discrepancy between the requirements of alethic reason on (...)
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  19. Review of K. Joanna S. Forstrom, John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy[REVIEW]Shelley Weinberg - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (12).
  20. The Resurrection of the Same Body and the Ontological Status of Organisms: What Locke Should Have (and Could Have) Told Stillingfleet.Dan Kaufman - 2008 - In Hoffman Owen (ed.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy. Broadview.
    Vere Chappell has pointed out that it is not clear whether Locke has a well-developed ontology or even whether he is entitled to have one.2 Nevertheless, it is clear that Locke believes that there are organisms, and it is clear that he thinks that there are substances. But does he believe that organisms are substances? There are certainly parts of the Essay in which Locke seems unequivocally to state that organisms are substances. For instance, in 2.23.3 Locke uses men and (...)
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  21. Vision in God and Thinking Matter: Locke’s Epistemological Agnosticism Used Against Malebranche and Stillingfleet.P. Schuurman - 2008 - In S. Hutton & P. Schuurman (eds.), Studies on Locke: Sources, Contemporaries, and Legacy. Springer.
  22. Victor Nuovo (ed.): John Locke. Writings on Religion.A. P. F. Sell - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):345-346.
  23. To what body and what humanity does the Christian doctrine of the Resurrection refer? Philosophical, exegetical and theological elements in John Locke's answer.M. C. Pitassi - 1998 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 53 (1):45-61.
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  24. The Resurrection of the Same Numerical Body, and its Reunion to the Same Soul, Asserted in a Sermon, in Which Mr Lock's Notions Concerning Personality and Identity [in an Essay Concerning Humane Understanding] Are Confuted, and the Author of the Naked Gospel is Answered.Henry Felton - 1725