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  1. Materialism From Hobbes to Locke.Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Are human beings purely material creatures, or is there something else to them, an immaterial part that does some (or all) of the thinking, and might even be able to outlive the death of the body? This book is about how a series of seventeenth-century philosophers tried to answer that question. It begins by looking at the views of Thomas Hobbes, who developed a thoroughly materialist account of the human mind, and later of God as well. All this is in (...)
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  2. Locke's Polemic Against Nativism.Samuel C. Rickless - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
    In the 17th century, there was a lively debate in the intellectual circles with which Locke was familiar, revolving around the question whether the human mind is furnished with innate ideas. Although a few scholars declared that there is no good reason to believe, and good reason not to believe, in the existence of innate ideas, the vast majority took for granted that God, in his infinite goodness and wisdom, has inscribed in human minds innate principles that constitute the foundation (...)
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  3. Locke, Shaftesbury, and Innateness.Daniel Carey - 2004 - Locke Studies 4:13-45.
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  4. Locke’s Essay, Book I: The Question-Begging Status of the Anti-Nativist Arguments.Raffaella De Rosa - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):37-64.
    In this paper I argue against the received view that the anti-nativist arguments of Book I of Locke’s Essay conclusively challenge nativism. I begin by reconstructing the chief argument of Book I and its corollary arguments. I call attention to their dependence on (what I label) “the Awareness Principle”, viz., the view that there are no ideas in the mind of which the mind either isn’t currently aware or hasn’t been aware in the past. I then argue that the arguments’ (...)
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  5. Locke’s Essay, Book I: The Question-Begging Status of the Anti-Nativist Arguments.Raffaella Rosa - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):37-64.
    In this paper I argue against the received view that the anti-nativist arguments of Book I of Locke's Essay conclusively challenge nativism. I begin by reconstructing the chief argument of Book I and its corollary arguments. I call attention to their dependence on "the Awareness Principle", viz., the view that there are no ideas in the mind of which the mind either isn't currently aware or hasn't been aware in the past. I then argue that the arguments' dependence on this (...)
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  6. Innate Ideas and Immortality in Descartes and Locke.John Shand - 2004 - Locke Studies 4:47-58.
    This paper traces the connections between the assertion or denial of innate ideas, and the possibility of the soul being immortal, in the contrasting cases of Descartes and Locke. Descartes and Locke disagree about whether there are innate ideas and the nature of the soul, but they agree that the soul is immortal. The issue explored is which theory of the mind, Descartes's or Locke's, is in the best position to contend that we to survive death, and indeed exist immortally. (...)
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  7. Locke’s Refutation of Innatism: Essay I.Ii.Benjamin Hill - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):123-134.
  8. Locke’s Refutation of Innatism Reconsidered.David Soles - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):127-132.
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  9. Locke's Acceptance of Innate Concepts.Dave Wendler - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (3):467 – 483.
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  10. Innate Idea and the Infinite: The Case Of Locke and Descartes. Rogers - 1995 - Locke Studies 26:49-68.
    Pierre Gassendi, who did not like nonsense, said of the idea of infinity: ‘if someone calls something "infinite" he attributes to a thing which he does not grasp a label which he does not understand’. Gassendi’s is a harsh judgement for, surely, we all do quite cheerfully and successfully use the concept of infinity, and in a variety of contexts. Yet if Gassendi’s judgement is too hard it is easy enough to have sympathy with his claim. For it is a (...)
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  11. John Locke: Natural Law and Innate Ideas.S. B. Drury - 1980 - Dialogue 19 (4):531-545.
  12. Locke's Attack on Innate Knowledge.Grenville Wall - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (190):414 - 419.
  13. The Polemics in the First Book of Locke's Essay.Gunnar Aspelin - 1940 - Theoria 6 (2):109-122.
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  14. Locke's Attack Upon Innate Ideas.Sterling P. Lamprecht - 1927 - Philosophical Review 36 (2):145-165.
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