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  1. Locke and Sensitive Knowledge.Keith Allen - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):249-266.
    Locke Defines Knowledge at the beginning of Book IV of the Essay concerning Human Understanding as “the perception of the connexion and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy of any of our Ideas” (E IV.i.2).1 So defined, knowledge varies along two dimensions. On the one hand, there are four “sorts” of knowledge: of identity or diversity; relation; co-existence or necessary connection; and real existence. On the other hand, there are three “degrees” of knowledge: intuitive knowledge, which consists in the “immediate” perception (...)
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  2. Locke on the Knowledge of Material Things.Robert Fendel Anderson - 1965 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (2):205-215.
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  3. Locke, the Quakers and Enthusiasm.Peter R. Anstey - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review:1-19.
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  4. Locke on Mixed Modes, Knowledge, and Substances.Christopher Aronson & Douglas Lewis - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (2):193-199.
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  5. Knowledge of Substance and Knowledge of Science in Locke's Essay.Margaret Atherton - 1984 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (4):413 - 428.
  6. The Foundations of Knowledge and the Logic of Substance.M. R. Ayers - 1994 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press. pp. 49--73.
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  7. Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
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  8. How Can Knowledge Derive Itself? Locke on the Passions, Will, and Understanding.Katherine Bradfield - 2002 - Locke Studies 2:81-103.
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  9. Locke E la Discussione Sugli Universali.Dino Buzzetti - 1982 - In Dino Buzzetti & Maurizio Ferriani (eds.), La grammatica del pensiero: Logica, linguaggio e conoscenza nell’età dell’Illuminismo. il Mulino. pp. 213-257.
  10. Locke's Account of Certain and Instructive Knowledge.Emily Carson - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):359 – 378.
  11. Locke, Kant, and Synthetic A Priori Cognition.Brian A. Chance - 2015 - Kant Yearbook 7 (1).
    This paper attempts to shed light on three sets of issues that bear directly on our understanding of Locke and Kant. The first is whether Kant believes Locke merely anticipates his distinction between analytic and synthetic judgments or also believes Locke anticipates his notion of synthetic a priori cognition. The second is what should we as readers of Kant and Locke should think about Kant’s view whatever it turns out to be, and the third is the nature of Kant’s justification (...)
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  12. John Locke: Theory of Knowledge.V. C. Chappell (ed.) - 1992 - Garland.
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  13. Locke's Theory of Demonstration and Demonstrative Morality.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Locke famously claimed that morality was capable of demonstration. But he also refused to provide a system of demonstrative morality. This paper addresses the mismatch between Locke’s stated views and his actual philosophical practice. While Locke’s claims about demonstrative morality have received a lot of attention it is rare to see them discussed in the context of his general theory of demonstration and his specific discussions of particular demonstrations. This paper explores Locke’s general remarks about demonstration as well as his (...)
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  14. The Causal Principle in Locke's View of Ordinary Human Knowledge.Mj Cresswell - 2004 - Locke Studies 4:183-203.
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  15. Locke on Knowledge and Trifling Propositions.C. de Almeida - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:31.
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  16. Locke et le savoir de probabilité.François Duchesneau - 1972 - Dialogue 11 (2):185-203.
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  17. Locke's Theory of Knowledge.Henry H. Ferguson - 1934 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):186-198.
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  18. Locke's Theory of Mathematical Knowledge and of a Possible Science of Ethics.James Gibson - 1896 - Mind 5 (17):38-59.
  19. A Note on Locke's Theory of Self-Knowledge.Donald Gotterbarn - 1974 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):239-242.
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  20. Epistemology and Science in the Image of Modern Philosophy: Rorty on Descartes and Locke.Gary Hatfield - 2001 - In Juliet Floyd & Sanford Shieh (eds.), Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 393–413.
    In Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (1979), Richard Rorty locates the perceived ills of modern philosophy in the "epistemological turn" of Descartes and Locke. This chapter argues that Rorty's accounts of Descartes' and Locke's philosophical work are seriously flawed. Rorty misunderstood the participation of early modern philosophers in the rise of modern science, and he misdescribed their examination of cognition as psychological rather than epistemological. His diagnostic efforts were thereby undermined, and he missed Descartes' original conception of a general (...)
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  21. Reconciling Locke's Definition of Knowledge with Knowing Reality.Benjamin Hill - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):91-105.
    A common criticism of Locke’s ideational definition of knowledge is that it contradicts his accounts of knowledge’s reality and sensitive knowledge. Here it is argued that the ideational definiton of knowledge is compatible with knowledge of idea-independent reality. The key is Locke’s notion of the signification. Nominal agreements obtain if and only if the ideas’ descriptive contents are the ground for truth; real agreements obtain only if their total denotation are the grounds for truth. The signification of the ideas determine (...)
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  22. The Epistemology Under Lockes Corpuscularianism.Michael Jacovides - 2002 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (2):161-189.
    The intelligibility of our artifacts suggests to many seventeenth century thinkers that nature works along analogous lines, that the same principles that explain the operations of artifacts explain the operations of natural bodies.1 We may call this belief ‘corpuscularianism’ when conjoined with the premise that the details of the analogy depend upon the sub-microscopic textures of ordinary bodies and upon the rapidly moving, imperceptibly tiny corpuscles that surround these bodies.2 Locke’s sympathy for corpuscularianism comes out clearly where he describes the (...)
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  23. Locke's Theory of Sensitive Knowledge.Henry G. Van Leeuwen - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):254-255.
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  24. Locke's Problem Concerning Perceptual Error.Antonia Lolordo - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):705-724.
    Locke claims that we have sensitive knowledge of the external world, in virtue of the fact that simple ideas are real, true, and adequate. However, despite his dismissive remarks about Cartesian external-world skepticism, Locke gives us little to go on as to how knowledge of the external world survives the fact of perceptual error, or even how perceptual error is possible. I argue that Locke has an in-principle problem explaining perceptual error.
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  25. Locke: "Our Knowledge, Which All Consists in Propositions".Ruth Marie Mattern - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (4):677 - 695.
  26. Knowledge.Peter Millican - manuscript
    LOCKE famously defines knowledge as “the perception of the connexion and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy of any of our Ideas” (Essay IV i 2), but his subsequent discussion significantly extends this somewhat vague and unclear definition. He starts by suggesting that knowledge always concerns one of four types of agreement or disagreement, namely “Identity, or Diversity”, “Relation”, “Co-existence, or necessary connexion”, and “real Existence”--his examples of the first two of these (perceiving the self-identity and distinctness of ideas, and the (...)
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  27. Locke on Knowledge.Lex Newman - 2007 - In The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
    The primary aim of this essay is to explain the central elements of Locke's theory of knowledge. A secondary aim arises from the official definition of knowledge introduced in the opening lines of book IV. Though Locke's repeated statements of the definition are consistent with the initial formulation, the consensus view among commentators is that that official definition is in tension with other book IV doctrines. My broader interpretation involves an effort to render the various doctrines consistent with the official (...)
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  28. Locke on Sensitive Knowledge and the Veil of Perception – Four Misconceptions.Lex Newman - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):273–300.
    Interpreters of Locke’s Essay are divided over whether to attribute to him a Representational Theory of Perception (RTP). Those who object to an RTP interpretation cite (among other things) Locke’s Book IV account of sensitive knowledge, contending that the account is incompatible with RTP. The aim of this paper is to rebut this kind of objection – to defend an RTP reading of the relevant Book IV passages. Specifically, I address four influential assumptions (about sensitive knowledge) cited by opponents of (...)
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  29. Locke and General Knowledge: A Reconstruction.Douglas Odegard - 1993 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 10 (3):225 - 239.
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  30. Locke, Habitual Knowledge and Memory.Douglas Odegard - 1967 - Dialogue 6 (3):379-382.
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  31. John Locke and the Changing Ideal of Scientific Knowledge.Margaret J. Osler - 1970 - Journal of the History of Ideas 31 (1):3.
  32. Locke on Mixed Modes, Relations, and Knowledge.David L. Perry - 1967 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (3):219-235.
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  33. Degrees of Certainty and Sensitive Knowledge: Reply to Soles.Samuel C. Rickless - 2015 - Locke Studies 15:99-108.
  34. Is Locke’s Theory of Knowledge Inconsistent?Samuel C. Rickless - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):83-104.
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  35. Locke on Empirical Knowledge.Nathan Rockwood - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
    This paper explores two related issues concerning Locke’s account of epistemic justification for empirical knowledge. One issue concerns the degree of justification needed for empirical knowledge. Commentators almost universally take Locke to hold a fallibilist account of justification, whereas I argue that Locke accepts infallibilism. A second issue concerns the nature of justification. Many (though not all) commentators take Locke to have a thoroughly internalist conception of justification for empirical knowledge, whereas I argue that he has a (partly) externalist conception (...)
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  36. Locke on Knowledge of Existence.Nathan Rockwood - 2016 - Locke Studies 16:41-68.
    The standard objection to Locke’s epistemology is that his conception of knowledge inevitably leads to skepticism about external objects. One reason for this complaint is that Locke defines knowledge as the perception of a relation between ideas, but perceiving relations between ideas does not seem like the kind of thing that can give us knowledge that tables and chairs exist. Thus Locke’s general definition of knowledge seems to be woefully inadequate for explaining knowledge of external objects. However, this interpretation and (...)
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  37. Is Sensitive Knowledge 'Knowledge'?Nathan Rockwood - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:15-30.
    In this paper I argue that Locke takes sensitive knowledge (i.e. knowledge from sensation) to be genuine knowledge that material objects exist. Samuel Rickless has recently argued that, for Locke, sensitive knowledge is merely an “assurance”, or a highly probable judgment that falls short of certainty. In reply, I show that Locke sometimes uses “assurance” to describe certain knowledge, and so the use of the term “assurance” to describe sensitive knowledge does not entail that it is less than certain. Further, (...)
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  38. Locke's Philosophy of Science and Knowledge. A Consideration of Some Aspects of 'an Essay Concerning Human Understanding'.G. A. J. Rogers - 1972 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):183-189.
  39. The Knowledge-As-Perception Account of Knowledge.Thomas D. Senor - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41:91-109.
    William Alston once argued that justification is not necessary for knowledge. He was convinced of this because he thought that, in cases of clear perception, one could come to know that P even if one’s justification for believing P was defeated. The idea is that the epistemic strength of clear perception is sufficient to provide knowledge even where justification is lacking; perceiving that P is sufficient for knowing that P. In this paper, I explore a claim about knowledge that is (...)
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  40. Locke on Knowledge and Perception.Robert E. A. Shanab - 1971 - Journal of Critical Analysis 2 (4):16-23.
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  41. Certainty and Sensitive Knowledge.David Soles - 2014 - Locke Studies 14.
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  42. Locke on Knowledge and Propositions.David E. Soles - 1985 - Philosophical Topics 13 (2):19-29.
  43. Locke's Account of the Reality of Knowledge.David E. Soles - 1984 - Southwest Philosophy Review 1:42-54.
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  44. A Defense of Locke's Theory of Sensitive Knowledge.Kathleen Marie Squadrito - 1973 - Dissertation, Washington University
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  45. Locke on Sensitive Knowledge as Knowledge.Scott Stapleford - 2009 - Theoria 75 (3):206-231.
    This article is an extended analysis of the most recent scholarly work on Locke's account of sensitive knowledge. Lex Newman's "dual cognitive relations" model of sensitive knowledge is examined in detail. The author argues that the dual cognitive relations model needs to be revised on both philosophical and historical grounds. While no attempt is made to defend Locke's position, the aim is to show that it is at least consistent, contrary to the received view. The final section provides textual support (...)
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  46. Locke's Attack on Innate Knowledge.Grenville Wall - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (190):414 - 419.
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  47. Locke on Modes, Substances, and Knowledge.R. S. Woolhouse - 1972 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (4):417-424.
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