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  1. Strings, Physies and Hogs Bristles: Names, Species and Classification in Locke.Allison Kuklok - 2018 - Locke Studies 18:1-27.
    It is often claimed that classification, on Locke’s view, proceeds by attending to similarities between things, and it is widely argued that nothing about the sensible similarities between things determines how we are to sort them, in which case sorting substances at the phenomenal level must be arbitrary. However, acquaintance with the “internal” or hidden qualities of substances might yet reveal objective boundaries. Citing what I refer to as the Watch passage in Locke’s Essay (henceforth Watches), many commentators claim that (...)
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  2. Locke on Individuation and Kinds.Joseph Stenberg - 2017 - Locke Studies 17 (87-116).
    Locke has been accused of endorsing a theory of kinds that is inconsistent with his theory of individuation. This purported inconsistency comes to the fore in Locke’s treatment of cases involving organisms and the masses of matter that constitute them, for example, the case of a mass constituting an oak tree. In this essay, I argue that this purported problem, known as ‘The Kinds Problem’, can be solved. The Kinds Problem depends on the faulty assumption that nominal essences include only (...)
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  3. Lockean Real Essences and Ontology.Jan-Erik Jones - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):137-162.
    In this paper I argue that John Locke is not ontologically committed to corpuscularian real essences. I do this by laying out his antirealist argument against corpuscular real essences within the Essay and then defend it. I then identify a version of real essences to which he is ontologically committed. Recognition of the antirealist argument in the Essay should significantly alter our interpretation of the Essay.
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  4. Locke's Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Michael Jacovides - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (1):153-155.
  5. Locke's Metaphysics.G. A. J. Rogers - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):199-202.
  6. Travel Literature, the New World, and Locke on Species.Patrick J. Connolly - 2013 - Society and Politics 7 (1):103-116.
    This paper examines the way in which Locke's deep and longstanding interest in the non-European world contributed to his views on species and their classification. The evidence for Locke's curiosity about the non-European world, especially his fascination with seventeenth-century travel literature, is presented and evaluated. I claim that this personal interest of Locke's almost certainly influenced the metaphysical and epistemological positions he develops in the Essay. I look to Locke's theory of species taxonomy for proof of this. I argue that (...)
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  7. Mechanism and Essentialism in Locke's Thought.Lisa Downing - 2013 - In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. pp. 159.
  8. Reply to Rickless.Antonia LoLordo - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:53-62.
  9. Locke's Metaphysics.Matthew Stuart - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Matthew Stuart offers a fresh interpretation of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, arguing for the work's profound contribution to metaphysics. He presents new readings of Locke's accounts of personal identity and the primary/secondary quality distinction, and explores Locke's case against materialism and his philosophy of action.
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  10. Locke's Moral Man.Antonia LoLordo - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Antonia Lolordo presents an original interpretation of John Locke's metaphysics of moral agency, in which to be a moral agent is simply to be free, rational, and a person.
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  11. Primary and Secondary Qualities in Locke's 'Essay'.Michael Ayers - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 136.
  12. Locke on Real Essence and Water as a Natural Kind: A Qualified Defence.E. J. Lowe - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):1-19.
    ‘Water is H2O’ is one of the most frequently cited sentences in analytic philosophy, thanks to the seminal work of Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam in the 1970s on the semantics of natural kind terms. Both of these philosophers owe an intellectual debt to the empiricist metaphysics of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, while disagreeing profoundly with Locke about the reality of natural kinds. Locke employs an intriguing example involving water to support his view that kinds (or ‘species’), such (...)
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  13. Understanding Affinity: Locke on Generation and the Task of Classification.Jennifer Mensch - 2011 - Locke Studies 11:49-71.
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  14. Locke y Putnam sobre la referencia.Luis Fernández Moreno - 2010 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 25 (1):21-36.
    RESUMEN: La teoría causal formulada por Kripke y Putnam es la teoría semántica dominante de los términos de género natural y, en especial, de los términos de sustancia. La teoría semántica de los términos de sustancia de Locke ha sido, supuestamente, refutada por aquélla. Según Putnam, la teoría de Locke ha pasado por alto dos importantes contribuciones a la semántica, y principalmente a la referencia, de los términos de sustancia, a saber, la contribución de la sociedad y la del entorno. (...)
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  15. Locke on Real Essences, Intelligibility, and Natural Kinds.Jan-Erik Jones - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:147-172.
    In this paper I criticize arguments by Pauline Phemister and Matthew Stuart that John Locke's position in his An Essay Concerning Human Understanding allows for natural kinds based on similarities among real essences. On my reading of Locke, not only are similarities among real essences irrelevant to species, but natural kind theories based on them are unintelligible.
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  16. Locke on Body and Extension.Thomas M. Lennon - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:15-26.
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  17. Leibniz and Locke on Natural Kinds.Brandon C. Look - 2009 - In Vlad Alexandrescu (ed.), Branching Off: The Early Moderns in Quest for the Unity of Knowledge. Zeta Books.
    One of the more interesting topics debated by Leibniz and Locke and one that has received comparatively little critical commentary is the nature of essences and the classification of the natural world.1 This topic, moreover, is of tremendous importance, occupying a position at the intersection of the metaphysics of individual beings, modality, epistemology, and philosophy of language. And, while it goes back to Plato, who wondered if we could cut nature at its joints, as Nicholas Jolley has pointed out, the (...)
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  18. Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499–534.
    In a well-known paper, Reginald Jackson expresses a sentiment not uncommon among readers of Locke: “Among the merits of Locke’s Essay…not even the friendliest critic would number consistency.”2 This unflattering opinion of Locke is reiterated by Maurice Mandelbaum: “Under no circumstances can [Locke] be counted among the clearest and most consistent of philosophers.”3 The now familiar story is that there are innumerable inconsistencies and internal problems contained in Locke’s Essay. In fact, it is probably safe to say that there is (...)
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  19. Leibniz and Locke and the Debate Over Species.Jan-Erik Jones - 2006 - In François Duchesneau & Jérémie Girard (eds.), Leibniz selon les Nouxeaux Essais sur l'entendement Humain. Vrin & Bellarmin.
    Susanna Goodin, in her article “Locke and Leibniz and the Debate over Species” , argues that Leibniz’s criticisms of Locke’s species conventionalism are inadequate as a refutation of Locke’s arguments, and if Leibniz were to buttress his criticisms by appeal to his own metaphysical commitments, he could do so only at the expense of so radically altering the nature of the debate that Locke’s original concerns would not even arise. I argue, however, that Leibniz has an argument within the Nouveaux (...)
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  20. Locke's Theory of Classification.Judith Crane - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):249 – 259.
    Locke is often cited as a precursor to contemporary natural kind realism. However, careful attention to Locke’s arguments show that he was unequivocally a conventionalist about natural kinds. To the extent that contemporary natural kind realists see themselves as following Locke, they misunderstand what he was trying to do. Locke argues that natural kinds require either dubious metaphysical commitments (e.g., to substantial forms or universals), or a question-begging version of essentialism. Contemporary natural kind realists face a similar dilemma, and should (...)
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  21. Locke on Natural Kinds and Essential Properties.Christopher Hughes Conn - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:475-497.
    The two opinions concerning real essences that Locke mentions in III.iii.17 represent competing theories about the way in which naturally occurring objects are divided into species. In this paper I explain what these competing theories amount to, why he denies the theory of kinds that is embodied in the first of these opinions, and how this denial is related to his general critique of essentialism. I argue first, that we cannot meaningfully ask whether Locke accepts the existence of natural kinds, (...)
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  22. The "Workmanship of the Understanding": Realist and Anti-Realist Theories of Classification in Boyle, Locke and Leibniz.Jan-Erik Jones - 2002 - Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
    The focus of this dissertation is the debate over classification and species realism/anti-realism in the new science of mechanism. I argue that Michael Ayers's Interpretation of Robert Boyle as a Lockean on species is incorrect. Boyle is more realist than Locke, indeed, Boyle's theory of classification was more similar to Leibniz's than to Locke's. This realist account of Boyle helps to diagnose an important connection between Leibniz and Boyle, and show Locke as a much more novel philosopher of science. ;I (...)
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  23. Substance, Sorts, and Consciousness: Locke's Empiricism and His Account of Personal Identity in "an Essay Concerning Human Understanding".Eva Deane Kort - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Florida
    In his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke famously introduces both the problem of personal identity over time and a controversial solution to it. The problem is to provide a criterion for when a person, A, at a time, t, is the same as a person, B, at a later time, t' . Locke's proposal that A at t is the same person as B at t ' just in case B at t' is conscious of some episode in the mental (...)
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  24. Epistemología representacionalista y realismo científico metafísico en Locke.Manuel Perez Otero - 2000 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):5-17.
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  25. Toward 'Perfect Collections of Properties': Locke on the Constitution of Substantial Sorts.Lionel Shapiro - 1999 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):551-593.
    Locke's claims about the "inadequacy" of substance-ideas can only be understood once it is recognized that the "sort" represented by such an idea is not wholly determined by the idea's descriptive content. The key to his compromise between classificatory conventionalism and essentialism is his injunction to "perfect" the abstract ideas that serve as "nominal essences." This injunction promotes the pursuit of collections of perceptible qualities that approach ever closer to singling out things that possess some shared explanatory-level constitution. It is (...)
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  26. Locke on Natural Kinds.Matthew Stuart - 1999 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (3):277 - 296.
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  27. Locke Ideas and Things.Michael Ayers, Ray Monk & Frederic Raphael - 1997
  28. The Possibility of Real Species in Locke: A Reply to Goodin.Pauline Phemister - 1997 - Locke Studies 28:77-86.
  29. Locke's Semantics and the New Theory of Reference to Natural Kinds. Laporte - 1996 - Locke Studies 27:41-65.
  30. Philosophie des ressemblances contre philosophie des universaux chez Locke.Geneviève Brykman - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):439 - 454.
    Tandis que l'histoire de la philosophie est traversée par la dichotomie entre le réalisme des universaux et le nominalisme, on tend à négliger la position intermédiaire — le conceptualisme — dont on a fait de Locke le plus illustre représentant, mais qu'on a tenu pour disqualifié par les célèbres critiques de Berkeley ou Leibniz. On peut cependant montrer que le conceptualisme est doublé d'une ontologie sous-jacente qui pourrait fournir aux philosophes contemporains une alternative originale à la philosophie des universaux. Whereas (...)
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  31. Locke as Anticipator of Putnam Rather Than Kripke on Natural Kinds.Daniel Galperin - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (4):367 - 385.
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  32. Locke and Two Notions of Natural Kind. Law - 1995 - Locke Studies 26:68-94.
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  33. Locke on Substance Ideas and the Determination of Kinds: A Reply to Mattern.M. Bolton - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:17.
  34. Locke on Natural Kinds as the 'Workmanship of the Understanding'.R. Mattern - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  35. 3 Locke's Philosophy of Body.Edwin McCann - 1994 - In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. pp. 56.
  36. Locke's Philosophy of Natural Science.Matthew F. Stuart - 1994 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    I examine two strands in Locke's thought which seem to conflict with his corpuscularian sympathies: his repeated suggestion that natural philosophy is incapable of being made a science, and his claim that some of the properties of bodies--secondary qualities, powers of gravitation, cohesion and maybe even thought--are arbitrarily "superadded" by God. ;Locke often says that a body's properties flow from its real essence as the properties of a triangle flow from its definition. He is widely read as having thought that (...)
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  37. Locke and 'Natural Kinds'.S. Wolfram - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  38. Locke: Vol. 1, Epistemology; Vol.2, Ontology.Michael Ayers - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):577-584.
  39. Locke's Proposal for Semiotic and the Scholastic Doctrine of Species.John Deely - 1993 - Modern Schoolman 70 (3):165-188.
  40. Locke: Volume I, Epistemology; Volume II, Ontology.R. S. Woolhouse - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy 89 (8):436-440.
  41. Locke on the Ontology of Matter, Living Things and Persons.Vere Chappell - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.
  42. John Locke on Real and Nominal Essence.James P. Danaher - 1990 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    In his Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke claimed that sensations enter the mind as unmixed simple ideas. Because we don't observe the necessary connections which unite such simple ideas into the complex ideas we have of substances, Locke concluded that such complex ideas must be constructed by our minds rather than given by nature. Since our ideas of substances, and the consequent ideas of essences that are abstracted from them, are not given by nature but constructed out of judgment (...)
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  43. Locke's Scepticism Concerning Natural Science.Susanna Lee Goodin - 1990 - Dissertation, Rice University
    Locke was a sceptic about the possibility of scientific knowledge of corporeal substance. Scientific knowledge is knowledge which is certain, universal, and instructive. According to Locke, to have certain and instructive knowledge of natural kinds requires knowledge of the real essence of natural kinds. Since a real essence is the foundation for the properties a thing has, it must be known before a deduction of the properties can be done. Locke did not believe that it was possible for humans to (...)
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  44. The Anti-Essential Locke and Natural Kinds.W. L. Uzgalis - 1988 - Philosophical Quarterly 38 (152):330-339.
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  45. Peter Alexander, "Ideas, Qualities, and Corpuscules: Locke and Boyle on the External World". [REVIEW]FranÇois Duchesneau - 1987 - Dialogue 26 (3):579.
  46. The Corpuscular Theory and the Semantics of Natural Kind Terms in Locke's "Essay".Linda Kaye Bomstad - 1982 - Dissertation, University of California, Davis
    Of the many disputes about Locke's views in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, two very basic ones concern his general theory of word meaning and his position on the question of the ontological status of genera and species, or what are currently called natural kinds. In this dissertation I propose to discuss, though not settle, the first dispute. I do propose to settle the second dispute by arguing that the views in the Essay are positively anti-realist and do not entail (...)
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  47. Natural Kinds and Freaks of Nature.Evan Fales - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (1):67-90.
    Essentialism--understood as the doctrine that there are natural kinds--can be sustained with respect to the most fundamental physical entities of the world, as I elsewhere argue. In this paper I take up the question of the existence of natural kinds among complex structures built out of these elementary ones. I consider a number of objections to essentialism, in particular Locke's puzzle about the existence of borderline cases. A number of recent attempts to justify biological taxonomy are critically examined. I conclude (...)
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  48. Locke Versus Aristotle on Natural Kinds.Michael R. Ayers - 1981 - Journal of Philosophy 78 (5):247-272.
  49. Problems From Locke by J. L. Mackie.M. R. Ayers - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (2):71-73.
  50. Problems From Locke.Gerald Hanratty - 1976 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 25:387-389.
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