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  1. Locke, Accountability and Personal Identity.Adam Abdulla - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:47-50.
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  2. Locke on People and Substances.William P. Alston & Jonathan Bennett - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (1):25-46.
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  3. Locke's Moral Man, by Antonia LoLordo.Peter R. Anstey - 2013 - Mind 122 (488):1146-1149.
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  4. Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Margaret Atherton - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):273-293.
  5. Locke Concept of Person.S. W. Bakhle - 1996 - Journal of Dharma 21 (1):86-93.
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  6. Identité et conscience de soi dans l'Essai de Locke.Étienne Balibar - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):455 - 477.
    Le rapport entre « conscience » et « identité » forme l'un des deux versants de la conception lockienne du sujet (l'autre étant constitué par la « propriété de soi-même »). La théorie lockienne repose sur la distinction du « mental » et du « verbal », et l'isolement du premier comme élément de la vérité. Elle suppose une reformulation du principe d'identité sous la forme d'une double négation inhérente à l'esprit (Mind) : il est impossible que l'homme ne sache (...)
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  7. On Earth As It Is in Heaven: Trinitarian Influences on Locke's Account of Personal Identity.John Barresi - 2006 - The Pluralist 1 (1):110 - 128.
    Locke’s concepts of person and self as they first appeared in the 1694 essay were not original to him but had already appeared in the Trinitarian controversy in England in the early 1690s. In particular, William Sherlock, who in 1690 argued that the Trinity might be understood as composed of three distinct self-conscious minds or persons in one God, previously used not only concepts but also phrases that Locke used in his definition of person. Both Sherlock and Locke defined person (...)
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  8. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On Personal Identity and Responsibility.Simon Beck - 2013 - South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):1-9.
    The psychological continuity theory of personal identity has recently been accused of not meeting what is claimed to be a fundamental requirement on theories of identity - to explain personal moral responsibility. Although they often have much to say about responsibility, the charge is that they cannot say enough. I set out the background to the charge with a short discussion of Locke and the requirement to explain responsibility, then illustrate the accusation facing the theory with details from Marya Schechtman. (...)
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  9. Leibniz, Locke and I.Simon Beck - 1999 - Cogito 13 (3):181-187.
  10. Locke on Persons and Personal Identity.David P. Behan - 1979 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):53 - 75.
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  11. Consciousness in Locke by Shelley Weinberg.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (1):164-165.
    Shelley Weinberg’s Consciousness in Locke builds on her previous journal articles and makes significant contributions to John Locke scholarship by offering the first systematic study of consciousness throughout Locke’s Essay. According to Weinberg, consciousness for Locke is self-referential, non-evaluative awareness internal to every thought or perception. She argues that once we realize the complexity of any perception—namely that every perception involves, “at the very least, an act of perception, an idea perceived, and consciousness ” —we can see that Locke’s conception (...)
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  12. Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):407-434.
    john locke argues that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness, and he maintains that any other theory of personal identity would lead to "great Absurdities".1 This statement intimates that Locke thought carefully about alternative conceptions of personal identity and their problems. In this paper, I argue that, by understanding Locke's account of personal identity in the context of metaphysical and religious debates of his time, especially debates concerning the afterlife and the state of the soul between death and resurrection, (...)
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  13. The Role of Appropriation in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2016 - Locke Studies 16:3–39.
    According to Locke, appropriation is a precondition for moral responsibility and thus we can expect that it plays a distinctive role in his theory. Yet it is rare to find an interpretation of Locke’s account of appropriation that does not associate it with serious problems. To make room for a more satisfying understanding of Locke’s account of appropriation we have to analyse why it was so widely misunderstood. The aim of this paper is fourfold: First, I will show that Mackie’s (...)
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  14. Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.Ruth Boeker - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):105-135.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
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  15. John Locke: Identity, Persons, and Personal Identity.Ruth Boeker - 2013 - Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
    John Locke offered a very rich and influential account of persons and personal identity in “Of Identity and Diversity,” which is chapter 27 of Book 2 of his An Essay concerning Human Understanding. He added it to the second edition in 1694 upon the recommendation of his friend William Molyneux. Locke’s theory was soon after its publication discussed by his contemporaries and has influenced many present-day discussions of personal identity. Distinctive about Locke’s theory is that he argues that the notion (...)
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  16. Locke on the Identity of Persons.Baruch Brody - 1972 - American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (4):327 - 334.
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  17. Shoemaker's Arguments Against Locke.Hugh S. Chandler - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):263-265.
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  18. Locke on the Ontology of Matter, Living Things and Persons.Vere Chappell - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.
  19. Locke on Personal Identity: A Criticism of One Interpretation.P. Cicovacki - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:57.
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  20. A Letter to Dr. Holdsworth Occasioned by His Sermon [on John V, 28,29] ... Concerning the Resurrection of the Same Body, in Which the Passages That Concern Mr. Lock Are Chiefly Considered. By the Author of a Defence of Mr. Lock's Essay of Humane Understanding. [REVIEW]Catharine Cockburn & Winch Holdsworth - 1726
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  21. A Body Worth Having.Ed Cohen - 2008 - Theory Culture and Society 25 (3):103-129.
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  22. Locke's Organismic Theory of Personal Identity.Christopher Hughes Conn - 2002 - Locke Studies 2:105-135.
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  23. Locke on Consciousness.Angela Coventry & Uriah Kriegel - 2008 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (3):221-242.
    Locke’s theory of consciousness is often appropriated as a forerunner of present-day Higher-Order Perception (HOP) theories, but not much is said about it beyond that. We offer an interpretation of Locke’s account of consciousness that portrays it as crucially different from current-day HOP theory, both in detail and in spirit. In this paper, it is argued that there are good historical and philosophical reasons to attribute to Locke the view not that conscious states are accompanied by higher-order perceptions, but rather (...)
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  24. Consciousness as a Guide to Personal Persistence.Barry F. Dainton & Timothy J. Bayne - 2005 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (4):549-571.
    Mentalistic (or Lockean) accounts of personal identity are normally formulated in terms of causal relations between psychological states such as beliefs, memories, and intentions. In this paper we develop an alternative (but still Lockean) account of personal identity, based on phenomenal relations between experiences. We begin by examining a notorious puzzle case due to Bernard Williams, and extract two lessons from it: first, that Williams's puzzle can be defused by distinguishing between the psychological and phenomenal approaches, second, that so far (...)
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  25. A Criterion of Diachronic Identity Based on Locke's Principle.Rafael De Clercq - 2005 - Metaphysica 6 (1):23-38.
    The aim of this paper is to derive a perfectly general criterion of identity through time from Locke’s Principle, which says that two things of the same kind cannot occupy the same space at the same time. In this way, the paper pursues a suggestion made by Peter F. Strawson almost thirty years ago in an article called ‘Entity and Identity’. The reason why the potential of this suggestion has so far remained unrealized is twofold: firstly, the suggestion was never (...)
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  26. 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality.Liam P. Dempsey - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  27. Hume and Locke on Personal Identity.Antony Eagle - unknown
    • But this is not all: since organisms differ from aggregates (maybe tables do too?). The difference: organisation, indeed, organisation that constitutes ‘vegetable life’.
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  28. Approaching the Individual: Survey of Descartes, Locke, Husserl, and Nagel.Rebecca Lynn Faulkner - unknown
    The modern Western concept of the individual begins first with the question of oneness. What does it means to be one? Herein I will briefly discuss how Descartes, Locke, Husserl, and Nagel, as important and interesting philosophers on this idea, treat the concept of the individual. Though this paper deals with a modern Western concept, it does so in the interest of providing philosophical background to my larger research interest in Muhammad Iqbal's ideas of the individual and the individual's relationship (...)
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  29. Locke and Personal Identity--Again.A. Flew - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:33.
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  30. Locke and the Problem of Personal Identity.Antony Flew - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (96):53 - 68.
    Locke's contribution to the discussion was fourfold: First , he saw the importance of the problem; Second , he realized that the puzzle cases, the “strange suppositions,” were relevant; Third , he maintained “same” had a different meaning when applied to “person” from its meaning in other contexts; and, Fourth , he offered his much criticized solution of the problem.
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  31. John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy.Joanna K. Forstrom - 2010 - Continuum.
    Introduction -- John Locke and the problem of personal identity : the principium individuationis, personal immortality, and bodily resurrection -- On separation and immortality : Descartes and the nature of the soul -- On materialism and immortality or Hobbes' rejection of the natural argument for the immortality of the soul -- Henry More and John Locke on the dangers of materialism : immateriality, immortality, immorality, and identity -- Robert Boyle : on seeds, cannibalism, and the resurrection of the body -- (...)
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  32. The Same Self.R. Gallie - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:45.
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  33. Locke on Personal Identity, Consciousness, and “Fatal Errors”.Don Garrett - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):95-125.
  34. Did Locke Defend the Memory Continuity Criterion of Personal Identity?Johan E. Gustafsson - 2010 - Locke Studies 10:113–129.
    John Locke’s account of personal identity is usually thought to have been proved false by Thomas Reid’s simple ‘Gallant Officer’ argument. Locke is traditionally interpreted as holding that your having memories of a past person’s thoughts or actions is necessary and sufficient for your being identical to that person. This paper argues that the traditional memory interpretation of Locke’s account is mistaken and defends a memory continuity view according to which a sequence of overlapping memories is necessary and sufficient for (...)
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  35. John Locke's Puzzle Cases About Personal Identity.P. Helm - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  36. Locke's Conditions for Personal Identity.P. Helm - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  37. John Locke's Problem of Personal Identity.Robert Troy Herbert - 1962 - Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  38. Newton's de Gravitatione Et Aequipondio Fluidorum and Lockean Four-Dimensionalism.Benjamin Hill - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):309 – 321.
  39. Personal Identity: A Defence of Locke.M. W. Hughes - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (192):169 - 187.
  40. Review: The Two Intellectual Worlds of John Locke: Man, Person, and Spirits in the 'Essay'. [REVIEW]N. Jolley - 2007 - Mind 116 (461):251-254.
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  41. The Resurrection of the Same Body and the Ontological Status of Organisms: What Locke Should Have (and Could Have) Told Stillingfleet.Dan Kaufman - 2008 - In Hoffman Owen (ed.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy. Broadview.
    Vere Chappell has pointed out that it is not clear whether Locke has a well-developed ontology or even whether he is entitled to have one.2 Nevertheless, it is clear that Locke believes that there are organisms, and it is clear that he thinks that there are substances. But does he believe that organisms are substances? There are certainly parts of the Essay in which Locke seems unequivocally to state that organisms are substances. For instance, in 2.23.3 Locke uses men and (...)
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  42. Locke on the Essence of the Soul.Garth Kemerling - 1979 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):455-464.
  43. The Conceptual Inexhaustibility of Personhood.Andreas Kemmerling - 2015 - Tsinghua Studies in Western Philosophy 1 (1):368-399.
    Some leading neuro-scientists recently proclaimed an obviously false view that a human person is his/her brain. This falsity arises partly from the conceptual difficulties concerning personhood/a person. By revealing inexhaustible richness of the characteristics of this concept of a person, this essay explains why the concept is so utterly puzzling. The author contrasts Descartes’ concept of a person with Locke’s. For Descartes, the concept has four features: (1) it is the concept of the mind/body-union; (2) it is innate and a (...)
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  44. Substance, Sorts, and Consciousness: Locke's Empiricism and His Account of Personal Identity in "an Essay Concerning Human Understanding".Eva Deane Kort - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Florida
    In his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke famously introduces both the problem of personal identity over time and a controversial solution to it. The problem is to provide a criterion for when a person, A, at a time, t, is the same as a person, B, at a later time, t' . Locke's proposal that A at t is the same person as B at t ' just in case B at t' is conscious of some episode in the mental (...)
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  45. Locke's Account of Personal Identity: Memory as Fallible Evidence.Anna Lännström - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (1):39 - 56.
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  46. Locke Against Himself: The Case For Re-Evaluating the "Lockean" Concept of Personal Identity.Ben Larson - unknown
  47. A Defence [by E. Law] of Mr. Locke's Opinion Concerning Personal Identity [in His Essay Concerning Human Understanding] in Answer to the First Part of a Late Essay on That Subject.Edmund Law - 1769
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  48. Persons and Minds By Joseph Margolis Reidel Publishing Company, 1978, Xiv + 301 Pp. [REVIEW]Don Locke - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):421-.
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  49. Locke's Moral Man.Antonia LoLordo - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Antonia Lolordo presents an original interpretation of John Locke's metaphysics of moral agency, in which to be a moral agent is simply to be free, rational, and a person.
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  50. Person, Substance, Mode and 'the Moral Man' in Locke's Philosophy.Antonia LoLordo - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):643-667.
    In 1769, the English bishop and theologian Edmund Law published a Defence of Mr. Locke's Opinion concerning Personal Identity.1 In this work, Law attempted to 'explain and vindicate Mr. Locke's hypothesis' (301) by offering a new account of Lockean persons. Law's account centers around three key claims. First, persons are modes — very roughly, properties — rather than substances. Second, the relevant properties are those that make moral evaluation appropriate, thus taking seriously Locke's insistence that 'person' is a forensic term. (...)
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