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  1. Locke on Space, Time and God.Geoffrey Gorham - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7.
    Locke is famed for his caution in speculative matters: “Men, extending their enquiries beyond their capacities and letting their thoughts wander into those depths where they can find no sure footing; ‘tis no wonder that they raise questions and multiply disputes”. And he is skeptical about the pretensions of natural philosophy, which he says is “not capable of being made a science”. And yet Locke is confident that “Our reason leads us to the knowledge of this certain and evident truth, (...)
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  2. Locke's Theory of Demonstration and Demonstrative Morality.Patrick J. Connolly - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (2):435-451.
    Locke famously claimed that morality was capable of demonstration. But he also refused to provide a system of demonstrative morality. This paper addresses the mismatch between Locke’s stated views and his actual philosophical practice. While Locke’s claims about demonstrative morality have received a lot of attention it is rare to see them discussed in the context of his general theory of demonstration and his specific discussions of particular demonstrations. This paper explores Locke’s general remarks about demonstration as well as his (...)
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  3. Locke and the Methodology of Newton’s Principia.Patrick J. Connolly - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (3):311-335.
    A number of commentators have recently suggested that there is a puzzle surrounding Locke’s acceptance of Newton’s Principia. On their view, Locke understood natural history as the primary methodology for natural philosophy and this commitment was at odds with an embrace of mathematical physics. This article considers various attempts to address this puzzle and finds them wanting. It then proposes a more synoptic view of Locke’s attitude towards natural philosophy. Features of Locke’s biography show that he was deeply interested in (...)
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  4. Locke, Kant, and Synthetic A Priori Cognition.Brian A. Chance - 2015 - Kant Yearbook 7 (1).
    This paper attempts to shed light on three sets of issues that bear directly on our understanding of Locke and Kant. The first is whether Kant believes Locke merely anticipates his distinction between analytic and synthetic judgments or also believes Locke anticipates his notion of synthetic a priori cognition. The second is what should we as readers of Kant and Locke should think about Kant’s view whatever it turns out to be, and the third is the nature of Kant’s justification (...)
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  5. Locke and Newton on Space and Time and Their Sensible Measures.Edward Slowik & Geoffrey Gorham - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press: pp. 119-137.
    It is well-known that Isaac Newton’s conception of space and time as absolute -- “without reference to anything external” (Principia, 408) -- was anticipated, and probably influenced, by a number of figures among the earlier generation of seventeenth century natural philosophers, including Pierre Gassendi, Henry More, and Newton’s own teacher Isaac Barrow. The absolutism of Newton’s contemporary and friend, John Locke, has received much less attention, which is unfortunate for several reasons. First, Locke’s views of space and time undergo a (...)
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  6. A Lockian Geometric Demonstration.M. J. Cresswell - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:21-43.
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  7. Lowe on Locke's and Frege's Conceptions of Number.A. Arrieta-Urtizberea - 2010 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 17 (1):39-52.
    In his last book about Locke’s philosophy, E. J. Lowe claims that Frege’s arguments against the Lockean conception of number are not compelling, while at the same time he painstakingly defines the Lockean conception Lowe himself espouses. The aim of this paper is to show that the textual evidence considered by Lowe may be interpreted in another direction. This alternative reading of Frege’s arguments throws light on Frege’s and Lowe’s different agendas. Moreover, in this paper, the problem of singular sentences (...)
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  8. The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke.Katherine Dunlop - 2009 - Philosophers' Imprint 9:1-31.
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant construes (...)
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  9. Leibniz on Locke on Mathematical Knowledge.Emily Carson - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:21-46.
  10. Locke and Kant on Mathematical Knowledge.Emily Carson - 2006 - In Emily Carson & Renate Huber (eds.), Intuition and the Axiomatic Method. Springer. pp. 3--19.
  11. Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson.Mary Domski - 2006 - Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  12. Locke on Simple and Mixed Modes.Emily Carson - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:19-38.
  13. Geometry and Experimental Method in Locke, Newton and Kant.Mary Domski - 2003 - Dissertation, Indiana University
    Historians of modern philosophy have been paying increasing attention to contemporaneous scientific developments. Isaac Newton's Principia is of course crucial to any discussion of the influence of scientific advances on the philosophical currents of the modern period, and two philosophers who have been linked especially closely to Newton are John Locke and Immanuel Kant. My dissertation aims to shed new light on the ties each shared with Newtonian science by treating Newton, Locke, and Kant simultaneously. I adopt Newton's philosophy of (...)
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  14. Identity, Individuality, and Unity.E. J. Lowe - 2003 - Philosophy 78 (3):321-336.
    Locke notoriously included number amongst the primary qualities of bodies and was roundly criticized for doing so by Berkeley. Frege echoed some of Berkeley's criticisms in attacking the idea that ‘Number is a property of external things’, while defending his own view that number is a property of concepts. In the present paper, Locke's view is defended against the objections of Berkeley and Frege, and Frege's alternative view of number is criticized. More precisely, it is argued that numbers are assignable (...)
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  15. Locke’s Account of Certain and Instructive Knowledge.Emily Carson - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):359 – 378.
  16. Locke's Geometrical Analogy.Matthew Stuart - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (4):451 - 467.
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  17. Locke i Leibniz o podstawach matematyki.Tadeusz Batóg - 1991 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 36.
  18. Locke on Mathematical Knowledge.Predrag Cicovacki - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):511-524.
  19. Genèse de l'Algèbre symbolique en Angleterre: une influence possible de John Locke.Marie-José Durand - 1990 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 43 (2):129-180.
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  20. Genèse de l'algèbre symbolique en Angleterre: une influence possible de John Locke.Durand-Richard Marie-José - 1990 - Revue D’Histoire des Sciences 43:2-3.
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  21. Genèse de l'Algèbre Symbolique En Angleterre : Une Influence Possible de John Locke.Marie-Jose Durand - 1988 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 41 (3-4):129-180.
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  22. Locke's Triangles.N. G. E. Harris - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):31 - 41.
    One of the most frequently discussed passages from Locke's An Essay Concerning the Human Understanding is that which occurs in IV.vii.9, where he writes:… the Ideas first in the Mind, ‘tis evident, are those of particular Things, from whence, by slow degrees, the Understanding proceeds to some few general ones; which being taken from the ordinary and familiar Objects of Sense, are settled in the Mind, with general Names to them. Thus particular Ideas are first received and distinguished, and so (...)
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  23. The Informal Logic of John Locke.Kevin Gregory Fanick - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Windsor
    Dept. of Philosophy. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1987 .F355. Source: Masterss International, Volume: 40-07, page: . Thesis --University of Windsor , 1987.
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  24. Locke and the Intuitionist Theory of Number.Richard Aaron & Philip Walters - 1965 - Philosophy 40 (153):197 - 206.
    The Purpose of this paper is to ask how far Locke can be said to have anticipated modern theories of number, particularly the intuitionist theory of Brouwer and Heyting. It has in mind Mr Edward E. Dawson's statement that Locke's account of number was not merely ‘a good effort in his own day’ but that ‘what Locke had to say really was quite fundamental, and a good deal of modern mathematics assumes his position, either explicitly or implicitly’. Mr Dawson thinks (...)
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  25. Locke on Number and Infinity.Edward E. Dawson - 1959 - Philosophical Quarterly 9 (37):302-308.
  26. Locke on Number and Infinity. E. E. Dawson - 1959 - Philosophical Quarterly 9 (37):302.
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  27. Empiricism and Geometry in Hobbes and Locke.George Goe - 1959 - Dissertation, Columbia University
  28. Locke's Theory of Mathematical Knowledge and of a Possible Science of Ethics.J. Gibson - 1896 - Philosophical Review 5:324.
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  29. Locke's Theory of Mathematical Knowledge and of a Possible Science of Ethics.James Gibson - 1896 - Mind 5 (17):38-59.
  30. Locke on Newton's Principia: Mathematics or Natural Philosophy?Michael J. White - unknown
    In his Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke explicitly refers to Newton’s Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica in laudatory but restrained terms: “Mr. Newton, in his never enough to be admired Book, has demonstrated several Propositions, which are so many new Truths, before unknown to the World, and are farther Advances in Mathematical Knowledge” (Essay, 4.7.3). The mathematica of the Principia are thus acknowledged. But what of philosophia naturalis? Locke maintains that natural philosophy, conceived as natural science (as opposed to natural (...)
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