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  1. Locke and the Methodology of Newton’s Principia.Patrick J. Connolly - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (3):311-335.
    A number of commentators have recently suggested that there is a puzzle surrounding Locke’s acceptance of Newton’s Principia. On their view, Locke understood natural history as the primary methodology for natural philosophy and this commitment was at odds with an embrace of mathematical physics. This article considers various attempts to address this puzzle and finds them wanting. It then proposes a more synoptic view of Locke’s attitude towards natural philosophy. Features of Locke’s biography show that he was deeply interested in (...)
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  2. Locke, Pyrard, and Coconuts: Travel Literature, Evidence, and Natural History.Patrick Connolly - 2018 - In J. T. A. Lancaster & R. Raiswell (eds.), Evidence in the Age of the New Sciences. Springer. pp. 103-122.
    Locke had a lifelong love of travel literature. He was also a proponent of the construction of natural histories. Many commentators have noted that there is a close link between these two interests. They suggest that data gleaned from travel literature was used in the construction of natural histories. This paper uses Locke’s reading of François Pyrard’s Voyage to argue that the relationship between the two genres was closer than has been realized. Specifically, it is argued that Pyrard’s discussion of (...)
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  3. Vision in God and Thinking Matter: Locke’s Epistemological Agnosticism Used Against Malebranche and Stillingfleet.P. Schuurman - 2008 - In S. Hutton & P. Schuurman (eds.), Studies on Locke: Sources, Contemporaries, and Legacy. Springer.
  4. Review Article. [REVIEW]J. C. Walmsley - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:243-284.
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  5. Locke, Providence, and the Limits of Natural Philosophy.Elliot Rossiter - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):217-235.
    John Locke's comments on experimental natural philosophy can plausibly be seen as a part of the physico-theological project of certain Christian virtuosi of the Royal Society to show that the workings of nature reveal the existence of a providential God. As I make clear, Locke thinks that God providentially designs us with limited epistemic capacities in order to check our pride and to motivate us to seek perfection in God. Locke maintains that a true science of nature is possible, but (...)
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  6. Peter R. Anstey. John Locke and Natural Philosophy . Pp. Xii+252. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Benjamin Hill - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):382-387.
  7. Inspiracje i kontynuacje problemów filozofii XVII wieku.Jolanta Żelazna (ed.) - 2013 - Wydawnictwo Naukowe Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
Locke: Matter
  1. Review of Jacovides's Image of the World.Nathan Rockwood - 2018 - Locke Studies 18.
    The overarching theme of Locke’s Image of the World, by Michael Jacovides, is that Locke’s belief in the best science of his day shapes his philosophy in important ways. Jacovides contends that “by understanding the scientific background to Locke’s thoughts, we can better understand his work” (1), including both his positions and his arguments for those positions. To a lesser extent, Jacovides’s book also treats Locke as a case study in thinking about how much scientific theory should influence philosophy. While (...)
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  2. Strings, Physies and Hogs Bristles: Names, Species and Classification in Locke.Allison Kuklok - 2018 - Locke Studies 18:1-27.
    It is often claimed that classification, on Locke’s view, proceeds by attending to similarities between things, and it is widely argued that nothing about the sensible similarities between things determines how we are to sort them, in which case sorting substances at the phenomenal level must be arbitrary. However, acquaintance with the “internal” or hidden qualities of substances might yet reveal objective boundaries. Citing what I refer to as the Watch passage in Locke’s Essay (henceforth Watches), many commentators claim that (...)
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  3. Locke's Image of the World.Michael Jacovides - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael Jacovides provides an engaging account of how the scientific revolution influenced one of the foremost figures of early modern philosophy, John Locke. By placing Locke's thought in its scientific, religious, and anti-scholastic contexts, Jacovides explains not only what Locke believes but also why he believes it.
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  4. John Locke : Empiricist, Atomist, Conceptualist and Agnostic.John Louis Kraus - 1972 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 162:215-215.
  5. A Useful Anachronism: John Locke, the Corpuscular Philosophy, and Inference to the Best Explanation.Selman Halabi - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):241-259.
    Locke is often interpreted as having attempted to build a foundation for knowledge based on ideas. However, textual evidence shows that the corpuscular philosophy is also a fundamental part of that foundation. Somewhat anachronistically, but also very usefully, Locke can be described as inferring corpuscularianism by an inference to the best explanation. Locke felt justified in believing that the corpuscular philosophy was the correct description of the world because it provided us with a better explanation of a wider variety of (...)
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  6. The Coherence of Cohesion in the Later Leibniz.Peter R. Anstey - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (4):594-613.
    ABSTRACTThis paper expounds and critically assesses G. W. Leibniz’s mature theory of the cohesion of material bodies. Leibniz’s later view of cohesion was forged in polemical engagement with the views of John Locke and the Dutch natural philosopher Nicolaas Hartsoeker and it is in Leibniz’s response to Locke in his New Essays on Human Understanding, and especially his correspondence with Hartsoeker, that the theory is revealed. After setting out Locke’s theory of solidity and cohesion, the paper examines Leibniz’s response to (...)
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  7. Ideas, Qualities, and Corpuscles: Locke and Boyle on the External World. Peter Alexander.Margaret J. Osler - 1986 - Isis 77 (4):715-716.
  8. Chapter 6. The “Sensible Object” and the “Uncertain Philosophical Cause”.Lisa Downing - 2008 - In Béatrice Longuenesse & Daniel Garber (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press. pp. 100-116.
    Both Immanuel Kant and Paul Guyer have raised important concerns about the limitations of Lockean thought. Following Guyer, I will focus my attention on questions about the proper ambitions and likely achievements of inquiry into the natural/physical world. I will argue that there are at least two important respects, not discussed by Guyer, in which Locke’s account of natural philosophy is much more flexible and accommodating than may be immediately apparent. On my interpretation, however, one crucial source of a too-limited (...)
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  9. The Influence of Pierre Gassendi on John Locke's Theory of the Material World.John Kish - 1984 - Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
    In his Nouveaux Essais, Leibniz places Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding in the Gassendist tradition. Modern philosophical historians have, however, largely disregarded Leibniz' claim. In this dissertation, I examine the evolution of Locke's theory of the material world, and argue that its final form in his Essay is correctly interpreted only if one takes seriously Locke's indebtedness to Pierre Gassendi. ;An examination of the early Drafts A and B of Locke's Essay places his theory of the material world squarely in (...)
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  10. John Locke and the Corpuscular Theory.F. Oliver Hanpeter - 1975 - Dissertation, Duke University
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  11. Locke's Corpuscularianism and Boyle.Guy Meynell - 2003 - Locke Studies 3:133-146.
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  12. Ideas, Qualities and Corpuscles: Locke and Boyle on the Natural World. [REVIEW]John Henry - 1986 - British Journal for the History of Science 19 (3):357-358.
  13. Locke, Boyle, and the Percieving of Corpuscles.David F. Wolf Ii - 1997 - Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (2):43-56.
  14. From Locke to Materialism: Empiricism, the Brain and the Stirrings of Ontology.Charles Wolfe - 2018 - In What Does It Mean to Be an Empiricist? Springer Verlag.
    My topic is the materialist appropriation of empiricism – as conveyed in the ‘minimal credo’ nihil est in intellectu quod non fuerit in sensu (which interestingly is not just a phrase repeated from Hobbes and Locke to Diderot, but is also a medical phrase, used by Harvey, Mandeville and others). That is, canonical empiricists like Locke go out of their way to state that their project to investigate and articulate the ‘logic of ideas’ is not a scientific project: “I shall (...)
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  15. Lockean Qualities and Boylean Corpuscles.I. Mazis - 1981 - Gnosis. A Journal of Philosophic Interest Montréal 2 (2):9-20.
  16. 3 Locke's Philosophy of Body.Edwin McCann - 1994 - In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. pp. 56.
  17. How Could a Respectable Seventeenth-Century Empiricist Be Influenced by Robert Boyle?Peter Alexander - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:103-118.
  18. Was Locke an Atomist?James Hill - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:75-101.
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  19. Hipótesis corpuscular y teoría del conocimiento en Locke.Wilson Valenzuela - 1990 - Universitas Philosophica 15:73-88.
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  20. Ideas, Qualities and Corpuscles: Lock and Boyle on the External World.James Somerville - 1986 - Philosophical Books 27 (4):211-214.
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  21. John Locke & Natural Philosophy (Review).Antonia LoLordo - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):296-297.
  22. Laws of Nature, Corpuscules, and Concourse.Struan Jacobs - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:373-393.
    It has been said that Robert Boyle gave in the century of The Scientific Revolution the “fullest expression” of the view that laws of nature are continually impressed by God (“occasionalism”). So regarded, the universe is anything but an autonomous machine, its ordered operation depending on God’s continuous imposition of lawful, patterned relations between phenomena and his continuous provision of motion for them to actually enter relations. The present paper contests this treatment of Boyle. Evidence is elicited to show that, (...)
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  23. God and Matter in Locke: An Exposition of Essay 4.10.Jonathan Bennett - 2005 - In Mercer & O'Neill (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind Matter Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    Although we never made time to talk it out thoroughly, Margaret Wilson and I shared an interest in, and enthusiasm for, the tenth chapter in Locke’s Essay IV, entitled ‘Of Our Knowledge of the Existence of a GOD.’ In the present paper, written in sad tribute to her work and her person, I shall expound that deep, subtle, intricate, flawed chapter. While I shall evaluate its arguments as I go, I chiefly aim just to make clear what happens in those (...)
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  24. How Matter Might First Be Made.Jonathan Bennett & Peter Remnant - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 4:1.
    In the fourth book of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding Locke hints that he could explain how God may have created matter ex nihilo, but refrains from doing so. Leibniz, when he came upon this passage, pricked up his ears. There ensued a sequence of personal events which are not without charm and piquancy, and a sequence of philosophical events which are of some interest. In this paper we tell the tale.
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  25. A Useful Anachronism: John Locke, the Corpuscular Philosophy, and Inference to the Best Explanation.Selman Halabi - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):241-259.
    Locke is often interpreted as having attempted to build a foundation for knowledge based on ideas. However, textual evidence shows that the corpuscular philosophy is also a fundamental part of that foundation. Somewhat anachronistically, but also very usefully, Locke can be described as inferring corpuscularianism by an inference to the best explanation. Locke felt justified in believing that the corpuscular philosophy was the correct description of the world because it provided us with a better explanation of a wider variety of (...)
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  26. Lockean Fluids.Michael Jacovides - 2008 - In Paul Hoffman, David Owen & Gideon Yaffe (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Vere Chappell. Broadview Press.
    Robert Boyle showed that air “has a Spring that enables it to sustain or resist a pressure” and also it has “an active Spring . . . as when it distends a flaccid or breaks a full-blown Bladder in our exhausted receiver” (Boyle 1999, 6.41-42).1 In this respect, he distinguished between air and other fluids, since liquids such as water are “not sensibly compressible by an ordinary force” (ibid., 5.264). He explained the air’s tendency to resist and to expand by (...)
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  27. Ideas, Qualities and Corpuscles: Locke and Boyle on the External World.Peter Alexander - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    This study presents a substantial and often radical reinterpretation of some of the central themes of Locke's thought. Professor Alexander concentrates on the Essay Concerning Human Understanding and aims to restore that to its proper historical context. In Part I he gives a clear exposition of some of the scientific theories of Robert Boyle, which, he argues, heavily influenced Locke in employing similar concepts and terminology. Against this background, he goes on in Part II to provide an account of Locke's (...)
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  28. Corpuscles, Mechanism, and Essentialism in Berkeley and Locke.Margaret Atherton - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (1):47-67.
  29. Locke on the Ontology of Matter, Living Things and Persons.Vere Chappell - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.
  30. Locke on "Particles".Donald F. Henze - 1971 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (2):222-226.
  31. Locke on the Propria of Body.Michael Jacovides - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (3):485 – 511.
    Seth Pringle-Pattison (233n1) observed that Locke “teaches a twofold mystery—in the first place, of the essence (‘for the powers or qualities that are observable by us are not the real essence of that substance, but depend upon it or flow from it’), and in the second place, of the substance itself (‘Besides, a man has no idea of substance in general, nor knows what substance is in itself.’ Bk. II.31.13).” In this paper, I’ll explain the relation between the two mysteries. (...)
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  32. Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499–534.
    In a well-known paper, Reginald Jackson expresses a sentiment not uncommon among readers of Locke: “Among the merits of Locke’s Essay…not even the friendliest critic would number consistency.”2 This unflattering opinion of Locke is reiterated by Maurice Mandelbaum: “Under no circumstances can [Locke] be counted among the clearest and most consistent of philosophers.”3 The now familiar story is that there are innumerable inconsistencies and internal problems contained in Locke’s Essay. In fact, it is probably safe to say that there is (...)
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  33. Matter and Spirit: The Battle of Metaphysics in Modern Western Philosophy Before Kant.James M. Lawler - 2006 - University of Rochester Press.
    Hobbes on morality and the modern science of motion -- Freedom as the realization of desire -- Leviathan : the making of a mortal God -- John Locke : underlaborer of the new sciences -- Locke on the freedom of the human spirit -- From Berkeley to Hume : the radicalization of empiricism -- Hume's science of the dynamics of the passions -- Adam Smith deciphers the invisible hand of the market -- Contradictions of economic life -- I think : (...)
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  34. Boyle, Bentley and Clarke on God, Necessity, Frigorifick Atoms and the Void.J. J. MacIntosh - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):33 – 50.
    In this paper I look at two connections between natural philosophy and theology in the late 17th century. In the last quarter of the century there was an interesting development of an argument, earlier but sketchier versions of which can be found in classical philosophers and in Descartes. The manoeuvre in question goes like this: first, prove that there must, necessarily, be a being which is, in some sense of "greater", greater than humans. Second, sketch a proof that such a (...)
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  35. Ideas, Qualities and Corpuscles. Locke and Boyle on the External World.Ezra Talmor - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (1):152-153.
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  36. Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity.Catherine Wilson - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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Locke: Mechanism
  1. Richard Baxter and the Mechanical Philosophers. [REVIEW]Patrick J. Connolly - 2019 - Locke Studies 19.
  2. Strings, Physies and Hogs Bristles: Names, Species and Classification in Locke.Allison Kuklok - 2018 - Locke Studies 18:1-27.
    It is often claimed that classification, on Locke’s view, proceeds by attending to similarities between things, and it is widely argued that nothing about the sensible similarities between things determines how we are to sort them, in which case sorting substances at the phenomenal level must be arbitrary. However, acquaintance with the “internal” or hidden qualities of substances might yet reveal objective boundaries. Citing what I refer to as the Watch passage in Locke’s Essay (henceforth Watches), many commentators claim that (...)
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  3. Thinking Matter in Locke's Proof of God's Existence.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    Commentators almost universally agree that Locke denies the possibility of thinking matter in Book IV Chapter 10 of the Essay. Further, they argue that Locke must do this in order for his proof of God’s existence in the chapter to be successful. This paper disputes these claims and develops an interpretation according to which Locke allows for the possibility that a system of matter could think (even prior to any act of superaddition on God’s part). In addition, the paper argues (...)
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  4. Locke's Image of the World.Michael Jacovides - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael Jacovides provides an engaging account of how the scientific revolution influenced one of the foremost figures of early modern philosophy, John Locke. By placing Locke's thought in its scientific, religious, and anti-scholastic contexts, Jacovides explains not only what Locke believes but also why he believes it.
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  5. Lockean Superaddition and Lockean Humility.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:53-61.
    This paper offers a new approach to an old debate about superaddition in Locke. Did Locke claim that some objects have powers that are unrelated to their natures or real essences? The question has split commentators. Some (Wilson, Stuart, Langton) claim the answer is yes and others (Ayers, Downing, Ott) claim the answer is no. This paper argues that both of these positions may be mistaken. I show that Locke embraced a robust epistemic humility. This epistemic humility includes ignorance of (...)
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  6. Locke, A Mechanical Philosopher?H. Duncan - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:11.
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  7. The “Corpuscular” Philosophy.Robert Boyle - 2009 - In Timothy J. McGrew, Marc Alspector-Kelly & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Historical Anthology. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 157.
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