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  1. The Role of Consent in Locke’s Theory of State.Elena Yi-Jia Zeng - 2020 - Historical Inquiry, Journal of National Taiwan University 66:201-236.
    John Locke’s theory of state is heavily constructed around his doctrine of consent. The doctrine indeed signifies a critical moment in the development of liberal and democratic theories in the history of political thought. Nevertheless, the doctrine has provoked various controversies and raises doubts on whether Locke’s early and later positions are reconcilable. This paper joins the scholarly debate through investigating the role of consent in Locke’s theory of state. It rejects the ahistorical readings of the doctrine that deliberation and (...)
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  2. John Locke E o Direito de Resistência.Flávio Gabriel Capinzaiki Ottonicar - 2019 - Investigação Filosófica 10 (1):75.
    Na sua principal obra política, os _Dois Tratados Sobre o Governo_, Locke defende o direito do indivíduo de resistir ao soberano. Entretanto, segundo Locke, o ser humano abandona o estado de natureza voluntariamente para criar o Estado político com a esperança de que o poder político amenize as inconveniências do estado de natureza. Se a criação do Estado político foi voluntária, em que circunstâncias se deve resistir às determinações do soberano? Além disso, como fundamentar o direito de resistência ao soberano (...)
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  3. Locke, Liberty, and Law: Legalism and Extra-Legal Powers in the Second Treatise.Assaf Sharon - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511987164.
    The apparent inconsistency between Locke’s commitment to legalism and his explicit endorsement of the extra-legal power of prerogative has confounded many readers. Among those who don’t ignore or d...
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  4. “A Trespass Against the Whole Species”: Universal Crime and Sovereign Founding in John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government.Sinja Graf - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (4):560-585.
    This essay theorizes how the enforcement of universal norms contributes to the solidification of sovereign rule. It does so by analyzing John Locke’s argument for the founding of the commonwealth as it emerges from his notion of universal crime in the Second Treatise of Government. Previous studies of punishment in the state of nature have not accounted for Locke’s notion of universal crime which pivots on the role of mankind as the subject of natural law. I argue that the dilemmas (...)
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  5. Considerações Sobre O Consentimento No Segundo Tratado de John Locke.Alessandra Tsuji - 2018 - Cadernos Espinosanos 38:223-244.
    Neste artigo procura-se destacar alguns pontos acerca do conceito de consentimento no _Segundo tratado sobre o governo, _a fim de fomentar a discussão sobre esse tema, bastante relevante, e ao mesmo tempo complexo, para a compreensão da teoria política de Locke. Neste percurso, busca-se ressaltar algumas passagens mais relevantes para a apreensão dessa noção com base em sua análise tanto no início das sociedades políticas quanto no exercício do governo civil. Além disso, procura-se apontar a conexão entre consentimento e confiança (...)
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  6. Propiedad, Democracia y Monarquía En John Locke.Roberto Rodríguez Guerra - 2017 - Contrastes. Revista Internacional de Filosofia 20 (2).
    RESUMENEl presente trabajo discute aquellas interpretaciones de Locke como un continuador del radicalismo leveller y un partidario inequívoco de la igualdad política y la democracia. Sostiene que su obra y pensamiento político persigue más bien un retorno a «our ancient government» y «its original constitution», esto es, un modelo de «monarquía moderada» o «mixta» que no sólo representa un retroceso democrático respecto al «republicanismo popular» de los levellers sino también una forma de gobierno en la que los elementos democráticos e (...)
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  7. Toward Modelling a Global Social Contract: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and John Locke.Takashi Inoguchi & Lien Thi Quynh Le - 2016 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 17 (3):489-522.
    The paper attempts to construct a global model of a social contract using well-known metaphors of two great philosophers: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and John Locke. By modelling a global social contract, I mean the formulation of a social contract using two sets of data: one is global citizens' preferences about values and norms while the other is sovereign states' participation in multilateral treaties. Both Rousseau and Locke formulate their versions of social contract theories in the national context of eighteenth-century Europe. This (...)
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  8. John Locke - Libertarian Anarchism.Helga Varden - 2014 - In Guttorm Fløistad (ed.), Philosophy of Justice. pp. 157-176.
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  9. Legitimidade Do Poder E Resistência Em Thomas Hobbes E John Locke.Juliano Cordeiro da Costa Oliveira - 2013 - Kalagatos 10 (20):171-192.
    Hobbes; Locke; Legitimidade; Resistência.
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  10. Locke on Consent: The Two Treatises as Practical Ethics.Michael Davis - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):464-485.
    Locke's Two Treatises of Government is (primarily) a work of practical (or applied) ethics rather than (as commonly supposed) political philosophy or (as some recent historians have argued) political propaganda. The problem is the oath of allegiance to James II. So interpreting it makes political obligation resemble the special moral obligations of profession rather than the general obligations of morality. Political obligation is the formal moral obligation to law that comes from voluntary participation in law-making (directly or through representatives one (...)
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  11. Vertrag und Vertrauen: Lockes Legitimation von Herrschaft.Michaela Rehm - 2012 - In Michaela Rehm & Bernd Ludwig (eds.), John Locke: „Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung“. Akademie Verlag. pp. 95-114.
    The paper discusses the foundation and genesis of the political society according to Locke, elaborating why the relationship between the civil society and the government is not defined in contractual terms, but by the notion of “trust”. Rehm argues against the view that Locke supports a liberal proceduralism, stressing that consent for him is indeed the necessary, but not the sufficient condition of legitimate political power: what needs to be added is action in accordance with the law of nature.
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  12. Sovereignty and the Separation of Powers in John Locke.Bedri Gencer - 2010 - The European Legacy 15 (3):323-339.
    Locke's conceptualization of sovereignty and its uses, combining theological, social, and political perspectives, testifies to his intellectual profundity that was spurred by his endeavour to re-traditionalize a changing world. First, by relying on the traditional, personalistic notion of polity, Locke developed a concept of sovereignty that bore the same sense of authority as the “right of commanding” attributable only to real persons. Second, he managed to reconcile the unitary nature of sovereignty with the plurality of its uses, mainly through a (...)
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  13. Crown Under Law: Richard Hooker, John Locke, and the Ascent of Modern Constitutionalism. [REVIEW]Ronald Tinnevelt - 2009 - Ethical Perspectives 16 (3):397-398.
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  14. Judging Necessity.Leonard C. Feldman - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):550-577.
    This article probes the relationship among constitutionalism, extra-legal prerogative power, and citizen judgment. While much has been written about the nature of Lockean prerogative, and while his theory serves as a direct inspiration for contemporary "normative extra-legalists," key participants in the debate over emergency powers, less attention has been paid to how the people judge prerogative. Attention to this issue is useful because an examination of the process of political judgment of extra-legalism in Locke leads to a complication of the (...)
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  15. Reason, Right, and Revolution: Kant and Locke.Katrin Flikschuh - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (4):375-404.
  16. Crown Under Law: Richard Hooker, John Locke, and the Ascent of Modern Constitutionalism.Alexander S. Rosenthal - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Crown under Law is an investigation of the constitutional idea through an exploration of the political thought of Richard Hooker and John Locke. It should appeal to academics within a number of disciplines including history of ideas, political philosophy, philosophy of law, and theology.
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  17. John Locke's America.John Perry - 2007 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 27 (2):227-252.
    RECENT STUDIES OF CHRISTIANITY'S RELATION TO LIBERAL POLITICS HAVE recognized the importance of specifying clearly what type of liberalism is being considered. Jeffrey Stout's critique is one such example. Unfortunately, Stout fails to engage the one thinker who arguably is the most influential in how Americans relate Christianity and politics: John Locke. Political arguments of today's Christians are premised, often unconsciously, on rival interpretations of Locke's political theology.
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  18. John Locke: Champion of Modern Democracy.Graham Faiella - 2006 - Rosen Pub. Group.
    Europe and England in the seventeenth century -- John Locke : his life -- Essay concerning human understanding and other works -- Influences on Locke -- The meaning of Locke's philosophy -- The influence and importance of Locke's work and ideas.
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  19. The Philosophy of Liberty : Locke's Machiavellian Teaching.Margaret Michelle Barnes Smith - 2006 - In Paul Anthony Rahe (ed.), Machiavelli's Liberal Republican Legacy. Cambridge University Press.
  20. Hobbes’s and Locke’s Contract Theories: Political Not Metaphysical.Deborah Baumgold - 2005 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):289-308.
    Abstract Inspired by Rawls?s admission that his twentieth?century contract theory builds in the parochial horizon of modern constitutional democracy, this essay critically examines two truisms about seventeenth?century contract theory. The first is the stock view that the English case is irrelevant to the logic of Leviathan and the Second Treatise. To the contrary, I argue that their political conclusions depend on introducing constitutional and legal ?facts?, in particular, facts about the constitution of the English monarchy. Second, I challenge the Whiggish (...)
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  21. Philosophy’s Gaudy Dress.Linda M. G. Zerilli - 2005 - European Journal of Political Theory 4 (2):146-163.
    John Locke famously sets the arts of rhetoric at odds with the pursuit of knowledge. Drawing on the work of Ernesto Grassi, this article shows that Locke’s epistemological and political arguments are parasitic on the very tropes and figures he would exclude in any serious discourse. Accordingly, Locke’s attack on the divine right of kings and his famous argument for the social contract is read as exhibiting a rhetorical structure. This structure is crucial to Locke’s critique of heteronomy and his (...)
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  22. Lockian Express Consent: An Argument Against Irrevocability.Michael W. Brough - 2003 - Locke Studies 3:113-131.
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  23. Justification, Legitimacy, and Social Embeddedness: Locke and Rawls on Society and the State.Simon Cushing - 2003 - Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):217-231.
  24. Locke and the Non-Arbitrary.Lena Halldenius - 2003 - European Journal of Political Theory 2 (3):261-279.
    In this article, John Locke's accounts of political liberty and legitimate government are read as expressions of a normative demand for non-arbitrariness. I argue that Locke locates infringements of political liberty in dependence on the arbitrary will of another, whether or not interference or restraint actually takes place. This way Locke is tentatively placed in that tradition of republican thought recently brought to our attention by Pettit, Skinner and others. This reading shifts the focus on legitimacy and identifies the independent (...)
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  25. Private Family, Private Individual: John Locke’s Distinction Between Paternal and Political Power.Kristin A. Kelly - 2002 - Social Theory and Practice 28 (3):361-380.
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  26. An'ontological'argument for the Contract-Trust Theory.Mj Cresswell - 2001 - Locke Studies 1:159-171.
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  27. Locke on Political Authority and Conjugal Authority. Sample - 2000 - Locke Studies 31:115-146.
  28. Locke on Political Authority and Conjugal Authority.Ruth Sample - 2000 - Locke Newsletter 31:115-146.
  29. Book Reviews : A Kind of Life Imposed on Man: Vocation and Social Order From Tyndale to Locke, by Paul Marshall. University of Toronto Press, 1996. 163 Pp. Hb. £32.50. ISBN 0-8020-0784-8. [REVIEW]J. C. D. Clark - 1998 - Studies in Christian Ethics 11 (1):99-102.
  30. Consensual Foundations and Resistance in Locke's `Second Treatise'.Rory J. Conces - 1998 - Theoria 45 (91):19-33.
  31. Extending Liberalism to Non-European Peoples a Comparison of John Locke and James Mill.Man To Leung - 1998
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  32. Locke on King's Prerogative.Pasquale Pasquino - 1998 - Political Theory 26 (2):198-208.
  33. “Denisons” and “Aliens”.A. John Simmons - 1998 - Social Theory and Practice 24 (2):161-182.
    Locke appears to be committed to the peculiar views that native-born residents and visiting aliens have the same political status (since both are tacit consenters) and that real political societies have very few "members" with full rights and duties (since only express consenters seem to be counted as "members"). Locke, however, also subscribes to a principle governing our understanding of the content of vague or inexplicit consent: such consent is consent to all and only that which is necessary to the (...)
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  34. Contract, Trust, and Resistance in the 'Second Treatise'.Rory J. Conces - 1997 - The Locke Newsletter (28):117-33.
  35. Hobbes and Locke on Authority.G. A. J. Rogers - 1997 - Hobbes Studies 10 (1):38-50.
  36. John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism.Barbara Arneil - 1996 - Oxford Unioversity Press.
    This book considers the context of the colonial policies of Britain, Locke's contribution to them, and the importance of these ideas in his theory of property. It also reconsiders the debate about John Locke's influence in America. The book argues that Locke's theory of property must be understood in connection with the philosopher's political concerns, as part of his endeavour to justify the colonialist policies of Lord Shaftesbury's cabinet, with which he was personally associated. The author maintains that traditional scholarship (...)
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  37. La politique révolutionnaire et les deux traits du gouvernement de John Locke, coll. « Léviathan ».Richard Ashcraft - 1996 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 186 (2):316-316.
  38. By Any Means Necessary: John Locke and Malcolm X on the Right to Revolution.Jill Gordon - 1995 - Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):53-85.
  39. Locke on Majority-Rule and the Legislative.A. Tassi - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  40. Two Notions of Consent in Locke's Second Treatise.A. Tassi - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
  41. John Locke, Natural Law and Colonialism.Barbara Arneil - 1992 - History of Political Thought 13 (4):587-603.
    In John Locke's Two Treatises of Government, the state of nature, and more particularly natural man, are created within the tradition of natural law. Several commentators, such as James Tully and Karl Olivecrona, have recognized this legacy in Locke's political thought.1 While providing an analysis of Locke's thought in relation to natural law, such studies, however, have not fully examined the global context within which both the Two Treatises and seventeenth-century natural law developed. Consequently the extent to which natural law (...)
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  42. Locke and the Right to Punish.A. John Simmons - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (4):311-349.
  43. Revolutionary Politics and Locke's "Two Treatises of Government".G. A. J. Rogers - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):668-670.
    'It would ... be a pity if the sketch of religious controversy in the 1670s contained in Richard Ashcraft's bold and exhilarating attempt to reconstruct the argument and intellectual framework of Locke's political thinking and activity should be thought to represent the entire debate accurately.' (Spurr 1988, 567 n. 17) 'has also taken the view that Locke equated the dissolution of government with the state of nature [pp. 576–6]. Important opponents of this view include Dunn [1969, p. 181] and Franklin (...)
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  44. Book Review:John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty: Mixed Monarchy and the Right of Resistance in the Political Thought of the English Revolution. Julian H. Franklin. [REVIEW]Geraint Parry - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):358-.
  45. Locke, Rousseau and the Idea of Consent: An Inquiry Into the Liberal Democratic Theory of Political Obligation.Carole Pateman - 1981 - Ethics 91 (3):513-516.
  46. John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty: Mixed Monarchy and the Right of Resistance in the Political Thought of the English Revolution. [REVIEW]John W. Yolton - 1981 - Political Theory 9 (2):266-268.
  47. Revolutionary Politics and Locke's Two Treatises of Government: Radicalism and Lockean Political Theory.Richard Ashcraft - 1980 - Political Theory 8 (4):429-486.
  48. The Legitimacy of the Civil Society. A Inquiry Into the Concept of Labour in the Theories of Locke, Smith, Ricardo, Hegel and Marx.Hajo Schmidt - 1980 - Philosophy and History 13 (2):156-158.
  49. John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty.Leon J. Goldstein - 1979 - International Studies in Philosophy 11:221-222.
  50. John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty. [REVIEW]Leon J. Goldstein - 1979 - International Studies in Philosophy 11:221-222.
1 — 50 / 63