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  1. Foundations of a Free Society: Reflections on Ayn Rand's Political Philosophy.Gregory Salmieri & Robert Mayhew - 2019 - Pittsburgh, PA, USA: University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Foundations of a Free Society brings together some of the most knowledgeable Ayn Rand scholars and proponents of her philosophy, as well as notable critics, putting them in conversation with other intellectuals who also see themselves as defenders of capitalism and individual liberty. United by the view that there is something importantly right—though perhaps also much wrong—in Rand’s political philosophy, contributors reflect on her views with the hope of furthering our understandings of what sort of society is best and why. (...)
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  2. An Approach to Political Philosophy: Locke in Contexts.James Tully - 1993 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    An approach to political philosophy: Locke in contexts brings together Professor Tully's most important and innovative statements on Locke in a treatment of the latter's thought that is at once contextual and critical. The essays have been rewritten and expanded for this volume, and each seeks to understand a theme of Locke's political philosophy by interpreting it in light of the complex contexts of early modern European political thought and practice. These historical studies are then used in a variety of (...)
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  3. Roads, Brtoges, Sunlight, and Private Property Rights.Mattew Block & Walter Block - 1996 - Journal de Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 7 (2-3):351-362.
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  4. 2. The Justification of Private Property.Dan Usher - 2000 - In John Douglas Bishop (ed.), Ethics and Capitalism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 49-80.
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  5. 6. From Private Property in Hume and Locke to the Universality of Natural Laws.David Braybrooke - 2001 - In Natural Law Modernized. University of Toronto Press. pp. 147-177.
  6. John Locke: Two Treatises of Government.Peter Laslett - 1967
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  7. The Liberal Politics of John Locke.Alan Gewirth & Martin Seliger - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (4):571.
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  8. On the Edge of Anarchy: Locke, Consent, and the Limits of Society.S. A. Lloyd & A. John Simmons - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (1):139.
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  9. God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought.Jeremy Waldron - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a concise and profound book from one of the world's leading political and legal philosophers about a major theme, equality, and the proposition that humans are all one another's equals. Jeremy Waldron explores the implications of this fundamental tenet for law, politics, society and economy in the company of John Locke, whose work Waldron regards 'as well-worked-out a theory of basic equality as we have in the canon of political philosophy'. Throughout the text, which is based on the (...)
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  10. A Theory of Property.Stephen R. Munzer - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book represents a major new statement on the issue of property rights. It argues for the justification of some rights of private property while showing why unequal distributions of private property are indefensible. Three features of the book are especially salient: it offers a challenging new pluralist theory of justification; the argument integrates perceptive analyses of the great classical theorists Aristotle, Locke, Hegel and Marx with a discussion of contemporary philosophers such as Nozick and Rawls; and the author moves (...)
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  11. The Limits of Property Rights in John Locke: An Evaluation Based on Natural Law.Bekir Geçit - 2014 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):91.
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  12. John Locke and the Doctrine of Majority-Rule.A. H. & Willmoore Kendall - 1942 - Journal of Philosophy 39 (25):695.
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  13. Private Property and the Distributist Thesis.Reginald Jebb - 1950 - New Blackfriars 31 (364):324-330.
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  14. Private Property a Moral Right.James Scally - 1949 - New Blackfriars 30 (353):377-380.
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  15. Theories of Private Property in Modern Property Law.S. Panesar - unknown
    The philosophical analysis of property is an ever-continuing process since the meaning, function and existence of the institution of private property is not constant but dynamic. This article explores four dominant justificatory theories of private property.
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  16. Private Property Rights: An Indispensable Moral Foundation of Society.Ayokunle Ogunshola - unknown
    The philosophic justifications of private property reach back to the ancient world. Aristotle regarded secure possessions as necessary for successful social functioning, and Cicero understood government’s function to be the protection of private property. Renaissance and Enlightenment thinkers Hugo Grotius, Samuel Pufendorf, and John Locke argued vigorously for the importance of private property rights in human life. The work of late twentieth-century analytical philosophers John Rawls and Robert Nozick brought property rights to the fore of philosophical discussion. In the field (...)
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  17. Allegiance and Jurisdiction in Locke's Doctrine of Tacit Consent.Julian H. Franklin - 1996 - Political Theory 24 (3):407-422.
  18. Chapter 8. Locke and the Reformation of Natural Law: Two Treatises of Government.Michael P. Zuckert - 2011 - In Natural Rights and the New Republicanism. Princeton University Press. pp. 216-246.
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  19. Chapter 9. Locke and the Reformation of Natural Law: Of Property.Michael P. Zuckert - 2011 - In Natural Rights and the New Republicanism. Princeton University Press. pp. 247-288.
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  20. Coming Into One's Own: Locke's Theory of Property, God, and Politics.S. C. Brubaker - 2012 - Review of Politics 74:207-32.
  21. Right of Resistance Non-Archaic: A Consideration of the Character of Locke's Defense.J. K. Numao - 2013 - Locke Studies 13:63-92.
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  22. Locke's Religious Thinking and His Politics.Victor Nuovo - 2011 - In V. Nuovo (ed.), Christianity, Antiquity, and Enlightenment: Interpretations of Locke. Springer.
  23. Locke's Theory of Property: A Re-Examination.Peter Paul Cvek - unknown
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  24. The Consent of the Governed the Lockean Legacy in Early American Culture.Gillian Brown - 2001
  25. An Essay Upon Government, Wherein the Republican Schemes Reviv'd by Mr. Lock [in Two Treatises of Government] Dr. Blackal, &C. Are Fairly Consider'dand Refuted. [REVIEW] Essay - 1705
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  26. Our Only Star and Compass Locke and the Struggle for Political Rationality.Peter C. Myers - 1998
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  27. Locke’s Tracts and the Anarchy of the Religious Conscience.Paul Bou-Habib - 2015 - European Journal of Political Theory 14 (1):3-18.
    This article reconstructs the main arguments in John Locke’s first political writings, the highly rhetorical, and often obscure, Two Tracts on Government . The Tracts support the government’s right to impose religious ceremonies on its people, an astonishing fact given Locke’s famous defense of toleration in his later works. The reconstruction of the Tracts developed here allows us to see that rather than a pessimistic view of the prospects for peace under religious diversity, what mainly animates the young Locke is (...)
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  28. The Right to Private Property.Tomasz Dzięgiel - 2005 - Diametros:1-11.
    The article considers the right to property according to John Locke, interpreted in the light of two mutually opposed positions: libertarian and Marxist. The former is represented by the American thinker R. Nozick; his adversary is G. Cohen. The views of I. Berlin and J. Rawls are also considered.The first part concerns the right to property. For Locke this was a basic right, to which he attached the highest value. The second part of the article presents the problem of how (...)
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  29. Labor, Liberty, and Property: A Critique of the Liberal Theory of Property of Locke, Nozick, and Rawls.Judy Dering - 1983 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    The right to private property plays an important role in liberal political theory. In this thesis I consider versions of the liberal theory of property developed by Locke, Nozick, and Rawls, arguing that each fails to give an adequate account of the nature and justification of the right to private property. Although Locke establishes a natural right to private property based on the moral value of labor, his theory cannot justify an inviolable right to private property where it is not (...)
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  30. John Locke's Contractarian Theory of Political Obligation.Yoen-kyo Jung - 1992 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    Locke's contractarian theory of political obligation has been controversial, largely due to his notorious distinction between express and tacit consent. To most political philosophers it is an inconsistent theory, and to most historians it is an inappropriate response to Sir Robert Filmer's criticisms of social contract theory. The aim of this dissertation is to show that Locke's theory of political obligation is much better than generally recognized. ;My argument is based primarily on the recognition that Locke developed a theory of (...)
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  31. Original Acquisition Today.Michael Vincent - 2010 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).
    An „Original Acquisition‟ justification of strong private property rights, allegedly first enunciated by John Locke, has in recent decades been increasingly adopted in some circles. These writers purport to demonstrate that as property rights may exist prior to, and provide a justification for, government and other forms of social constraint; they should therefore to the greatest possible extent be immune to the latter‟s interference. Yet many theorists equivocate as to whether the acquisition they write of is only an in-theory possibility, (...)
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  32. Lockean Economics: Against the Charge Locke Fails to Justify Contemporary Inequality.Patrick Young Lin - 1997 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    In his Second Treatise of Government, John Locke offers a theory of property. It is widely believed that his theory culminates in what has been called the consent argument, by which Locke justifies the genesis of contemporary inequality from an egalitarian state of nature. And it is believed that he also asserts here the so-called Lockean provisos, namely the fair share limit and the waste limit. However, it has been convincingly objected that Locke's consent argument does not work. This is (...)
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  33. Locke's Labor Theory of Original Appropriation: Philosophical Significance and Implications.Simeon Wyckliffe Hebert - 1993 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    A reconsideration of the logical structure of arguments for property rights reveals that Locke's labor theory of original appropriation is more important than has been previously recognized because the justification of property rights must be deontological and of the four possible justifications of property rights-- universal consent, social utility, self-actualization, and Locke's labor theory--only Locke's theory is deontological. So if any justification of property rights exists, it must be based upon Locke's labor theory. Consequently, if Locke's theory fails, property rights (...)
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  34. Property Rights: A Lockean-Christian View.Paul Kong - 1989 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    In this dissertation, I concur with John Locke's critics, who charge that he first set up natural law to limit the amount of property individuals may own and then found a way to allow people to circumvent those limits. However, Locke's property theory does have some merits. It has generated a large amount of productivity; it is just in the sense that it gives laborers what is due to them; and it is based on a Christian premise that holds, originally, (...)
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  35. The Leaven in the Loaf: A Comparative Analysis of the Social Reconstructionist Projects of John Locke and Martin Luther King, Jr.Adetokunbo Atodele Adelekan - 2002 - Dissertation, Princeton Theological Seminary
    This dissertation compares two competing theologically informed projects of social reconstruction. I argue that a critical examination of their projects in social reconstructionism reveals the crucial differences and similarities between John Locke and Martin Luther King Jr's relation to modern liberalism. Though John Locke developed a covenant-based social contract theory for seventeenth century Britain, much of its theological content was lost as others adopted it that came under its influence. This was certainly the case in British North America and subsequently, (...)
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  36. Nathan Tarcov, Locke's Education for Liberty. [REVIEW]Peter Schouls - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5:89-91.
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  37. Matthew H. Kramer, John Locke and the Origins of Private Property: Philosophical Explorations of Individualism, Community, and Equality. [REVIEW]John Bishop - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18:354-356.
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  38. Gopal Sreenivasan, The Limits of Lockean Rights in Property. [REVIEW]Peter Vallentyne - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18:62-64.
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  39. James Tully, A Discourse on Property: John Locke and His Adversaries. [REVIEW]John Exdell - 1984 - Philosophy in Review 4:288-290.
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  40. James Tully, An Approach to Political Philosophy: Locke in Contexts. [REVIEW]Peter Schouls - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14:217-219.
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  41. Ruth Grant, John Locke's Liberalism. [REVIEW]Michael Lessnoff - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8:20-22.
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  42. C.B. Macpherson, Ed., Locke's Second Treatise Of Government. [REVIEW]Gregory Pyrcz - 1981 - Philosophy in Review 1:266-268.
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  43. An Agonized State of Peace: The Lockean Social Contract Theory of Woodrow Wilson.David William Yang - 1996 - Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
    The theoretical similarity between domestic and international liberalism has yet to be fully understood. This study therefore seeks to compare the classic domestic liberalism of John Locke with the equally classic international liberalism of Woodrow Wilson. Specifically, the study tests the hypothesis that Wilson's policy on the League of Nations represented an international version of Locke's social contract theory. The hypothesis is tested by means of a historico-analytical method that combines textual interpretation with historical reconstruction. ;Overall, the study's results confirm (...)
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  44. And From That Equal Creation: The Philosophy of Locke and the Founding of America.Jerome Huyler - 1992 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation argues that much of the debate concerning John Locke's influence on the American founding is mired in an insufficient grasp of Locke's own theory of nature and society. It is inadequate to see Locke as defending possessive acquisitiveness and the interests of property, narrowly, or interest-group liberalism, utilitarianism or capitalism, more broadly--as many scholars do. ;Reconsidering Locke's major works as well as recent studies that have explored his contextual setting and historical purposes, I argue that Locke left behind (...)
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  45. Power and Authority in John Locke.Izuchukwu Marcel Onyeocha - 1992 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    This study examines Locke's theory of power in the state of nature, in the family, and in civil society. ;The introductory first chapter highlights the themes of natural law, natural right, individual freedom, private property, power and authority, which run through Locke's political theory, particularly as articulated in his Two Treatises of Government. ;The second chapter focuses on the state of nature where no one had or exercised any authority over another, and where life and property were always insecure. Locke (...)
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  46. The Emergence of the Liberal Doctrine of Toleration in the Thought of John Locke.Kenneth Lawrence Grasso - 1989 - Dissertation, Fordham University
    The existence of a commonly held civil theology or public orthodoxy is a precondition of a viable and well-functioning political order. In the English nation-state, prior to the seventeenth century, such an authoritative civil theology was supplied by an established church. The English wars of Religion, however, demonstrated that an increasingly fragmented Christianity was no longer capable of fulfilling this role. Faced with intractable religious divisions, toleration was adopted as a prudential device to secure peace. This expedient, however, left England (...)
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  47. Made by Contrivance and Consent of Men: Abstract Principle and Historical Fact in Locke's Political Philosophy.Govert den Hartogh - 1990 - Interpretation 17 (2):193-221.
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  48. Appropriating Persons: John Locke's Theory of Private Property.Thomas James Berry - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    By giving a unified account of what Locke says about appropriation in an Essay concerning Human Understanding and Two Treatises of Government, I generate a new account of Locke's theory of private property. I argue that Locke develops a coherent theory of private property, which includes both general and special rights. A right is special just in case it arises from one's involvement in some particular relationship or transaction; a right is general just in case it arises from the sort (...)
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  49. Property Rights and the Political Philosophy of John Locke.Ruth J. Sample - 1995 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The ultimate aim of this dissertation is to determine whether libertarian theories of property can be adequately grounded in Locke's theory of natural rights. I defend the thesis that Locke's theory has no room for a fundamental commitment to natural rights, including property rights. ;In the first three chapters, I challenge each component of the dominant interpretation of Locke's theory of property in this century, viz., that of C. B. Macpherson. In Chapter One, I criticize Macpherson's claim that Locke's view (...)
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  50. Property and Justice: A Critical and Historical Study of Locke's Liberalism.Kiyoshi Shimokawa - 1985 - Dissertation, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;The major task of this dissertation is to offer a scholarly interpretation of Locke's political theory, while its minor task is to criticize his political theory. ;Introduction presents the broad framework of interpretation which I adopt, the framework of classical liberalism. Classical liberalism can be summed up in the words of Lippmann: "Thus in a free society the state does not administer the affairs of men. It administers justice among men who (...)
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