This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

8 found
Order:
  1. added 2018-07-16
    “A Trespass Against the Whole Species”: Universal Crime and Sovereign Founding in John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government.Sinja Graf - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (4):560-585.
    This essay theorizes how the enforcement of universal norms contributes to the solidification of sovereign rule. It does so by analyzing John Locke’s argument for the founding of the commonwealth as it emerges from his notion of universal crime in the Second Treatise of Government. Previous studies of punishment in the state of nature have not accounted for Locke’s notion of universal crime which pivots on the role of mankind as the subject of natural law. I argue that the dilemmas (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2016-09-19
    Punitive Warfare, Counterterrorism, and Jus Ad Bellum.Shawn Kaplan - 2013 - In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge. pp. 236-249.
    In order to address whether states can ever have the proper authority to militarily punish other international agents, I examine three attempts to justify punitive warfare from Augustine, Grotius and Locke for their relevance to both our contemporary international legal and political order and our contemporary security threats from sporadic terrorist or militant violence. Once a plausible model for a state’s valid authority to punish international agents is found, I will consider what punitive aims it can support and what challenges (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2014-03-30
    Locke on Punishment and the Death Penalty.Brian Calvert - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (264):211 - 229.
    At the end of the opening chapter of his Second Treatise of Government , Locke describes political power in the following terms: ‘Political Power then I take to be a Right of making Laws with Penalties of Death, and consequently all less Penalties, for the Regulating and Preserving of Property, and of employing the force of the Community, in the Execution of such Laws, and in the defence of the Common-wealth from Foreign Injury, and all this only for the Publick (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2014-03-25
    Locke, Waldron and the Moral Status of 'Crooks'.Rebecca Kingston - 2008 - European Journal of Political Theory 7 (2):203-221.
    This article provides an assessment of Jeremy Waldron's arguments (in God, Locke and Equality and his subsequent 'Response to Critics') that Locke provides us with a compelling version of liberal equality. A close examination of the case of the criminally convicted in The Second Treatise shows how Locke's commitment to the principle of equality is compromised. This is revealed in part through recourse to contextualist considerations. This leads to the suggestion that Waldron's principled rejection of contextualist approaches to the history (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2014-03-10
    Locke on Punishment, Property and Moral Knowledge.Lee Ward - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (2):218-244.
    Locke's admittedly 'very strange' sounding doctrine of natural executive power, according to which the individual has the right to execute the law of nature, has long been one of the most controversial features of his moral philosophy. In contrast to the many commentators who deny its theoretical innovation and challenge its individualist premises, this study proposes that the philosophical significance of Locke's natural right to punish derives from its critical departure from earlier moral and political theory. It also argues that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2014-01-19
    Susceptibility to Punishment: A Response to Yaffe.David J. Anderson - 2008 - Locke Studies 8:101-106.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2013-08-15
    Locke on the Death Penalty.A. John Simmons - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (270):471-.
    Brian Calvert has offered us a clear and careful analysis of Locke's views on punishment and capital punishment. The primary goal of his paper - that of correcting the misperception of Locke as a wholehearted proponent of capital punishment for a wide range of offenses - must be allowed to be both laudable and largely achieved in his discussion. But Calvert's analysis also encourages, I think, a number of serious misunderstandings of Locke's true position.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2013-08-15
    Locke and the Right to Punish.A. John Simmons - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (4):311-349.