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  1. added 2015-05-04
    Primary and Secondary Qualities in Locke's 'Essay'.Michael Ayers - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 136.
  2. added 2015-05-04
    Locke: Vol. 1, Epistemology; Vol.2, Ontology.Michael Ayers - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):577-584.
  3. added 2015-04-06
    Locke’s Metaphysics and Newtonian Metaphysics.Lisa Downing - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-118.
    Locke’s metaphysical commitments are a matter of some controversy. Further controversy attends the issue of whether and how Locke adapts his views in order to accommodate the success of Newton’s Principia. The chapter lays out an interpretation of Locke’s commitments according to which Locke’s response to Newton on gravity does not require the positing of brute powers and is consistent with his core essentialism. The chapter raises the question of how the hypothesis concerning the creation of matter, alluded to at (...)
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  4. added 2015-01-20
    Locke's Place‐Time‐Kind Principle.Jessica Gordon‐Roth - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (4):264-274.
    John Locke discusses the notions of identity and diversity in Book 2, Chapter 27 of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. At the beginning of this much-discussed chapter, Locke posits the place-time-kind principle. According to this principle, no two things of the same kind can be in the same place at the same time . Just what Locke means by this is unclear, however. So too is whether this principle causes problems for Locke, and whether these problems can be resolved. This (...)
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  5. added 2014-01-19
    Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson.Mary Domski - 2006 - Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  6. added 2013-08-14
    Not Just a Coincidence. Conditional Counter-Examples to Locke's Thesis.Giuseppe Spolaore - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):108-115.
    So-called Locke's thesis is the view that no two things of the same kind may coincide, that is, may be completely in the same place at the same time. A number of counter-examples to this view have been proposed. In this paper, some new and arguably more convincing counter-examples to Locke's thesis are presented. In these counter-examples, a particular entity (a string, a rope, a net, or similar) is interwoven to obtain what appears to be a distinct, thicker entity of (...)
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  7. added 2013-08-14
    The Speed of Thought. Experience of Change, Movement, and Time: A Lockean Account.Jiri Benovsky - 2012 - Locke Studies 12:85-110.
    This paper is about our experience of change and movement, and thus about our experience of time – at least under the reasonable assumption that we (can only) experience time by having experiences of change. This assumption is shared by Locke, whose view on temporal experience, expounded in Book II, Chap.14 of his Essay, will be the main focal point of my paper. Some of the most influential accounts of temporal experience embrace the notion of a "specious present" as an (...)
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  8. added 2013-08-14
    The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke.Katherine Dunlop - 2009 - Philosophers' Imprint 9:1-31.
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant construes (...)
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  9. added 2013-08-14
    Time in Locke and Kant.Patrick S. Madigan - 1976 - Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):20-50.
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  10. added 2013-08-14
    Locke's Idea of Spatial Extension.R. S. Woolhouse - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (3):313-318.
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  11. added 2013-08-13
    Locke, Leibniz, and Wiggins on Being in the Same Place at the Same Time.David H. Sanford - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (1):75-82.
    Locke thought it was a necessary truth that no two material bodies could be in the same place at the same time. Leibniz wasn't so sure. This paper sides with Leibniz. I examine the arguments of David Wiggins in defense of Locke on this point (Philosophical Review, January 1968). Wiggins’ arguments are ineffective.
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  12. added 2013-08-12
    Locke's Atomism.Thomas M. Lennon - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:1-28.
    What ultimately exists for Locke is the solid. Reading this ontology in light of the atomist tradition elucidates and relates a number of important issues in the Essay: the analysis of space and related concepts, the distinction between simple and complex ideas, the distinction between primary and secondary qualitie the analysis of power and causation.
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