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  1. added 2019-01-18
    Con e oltre Thomas Hobbes: lo stato di natura in John Locke.Federico Fiorentini - 2008 - Annali Del Dipartimento di Filosofia 14:53-70.
    When Locke develops his view of the state of nature, he keepsin mind the recents works of Thomas Hobbes. Nevertheless, theweight of the will of God in Locke’s theory makes his ‘state ofnature’ less dangerous and lonely than Hobbes’s one. So, whilethe basis of the two systems are similar, the models of the commonwealths that arise from them are diametrically opposite:if Hobbes wants to defend the absolute power of the EnglishCrown, Locke supports the parliamentary principle of the dawningWhig party.
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  2. added 2019-01-18
    John Locke: la división de poderes y la tradición democrática contemporánea.Miguel Alejandro García - 2002 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 22:9-15.
    De acuerdo con John Locke, el estado de naturaleza sufre de una insuficiencia jurídica: ser juez del propio caso. El sistema republicano es la solución a tal inadecuación. Este artículo intenta demostrar que la superioridad del sistema republicano no se funda en razones económicas o demográficas, sino en una base moral.
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  3. added 2018-05-08
    Natural Law And Civil Law in John Locke.Gustavo Hessmann Dalaqua - 2015 - Aufklärung 2 (1):149-168.
    This paper deals with the relationship between natural law and civil law in John Locke’s philosophy. Although renowned scholars have claimed that such a relationship is deductive, this paper will try to show a different interpretation and argue that the relationship between civil law and natural law is one of determination. Far from being a mere deduction of an immutable natural law, civil law plays a determinative role in natural law. As we shall see, this interpretation highlights something that Locke (...)
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  4. added 2018-01-10
    Lockean Freedom and the Proviso's Appeal to Scientific Knowledge.Helga Varden - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):1-20.
    This paper argues that Locke and contemporary Lockeans underestimate the problems involved in their frequent, implicit assumption that when we apply the proviso we use the latest scientific knowledge of natural resources, technology and the economy’s operations. Problematic for these theories is that much of the pertinent knowledge used is obtained through particular persons’ labour. If the knowledge obtained through individuals’ labour must be made available to everyone and if particular persons’ new knowledge affects the proviso’s proper application, then some (...)
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  5. added 2018-01-10
    Nozick's Reply to the Anarchist.Helga Varden - 2009 - Law and Philosophy 28 (6):585 - 616.
    Central to Nozick’s Anarchy, State and Utopia is a defense of the legitimacy of the minimal state’s use of coercion against anarchist objections. Individuals acting within their natural rights can establish the state without committing wrongdoing against those who disagree. Nozick attempts to show that even with a natural executive right, individuals need not actually consent to incur political obligations. Nozick’s argument relies on an account of compensation to remedy the infringement of the non-consenters’ procedural rights. Compensation, however, cannot remedy (...)
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  6. added 2016-12-08
    Locke's State of Nature.A. John Simmons - 1989 - Political Theory 17 (3):449-470.
  7. added 2016-06-14
    Der Naturzustand Im "Second Treatise of Government" Und Die Vorrechtliche Welt H. L. A. Harts.Gunter Zimmermann - 1988 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 42 (3):433 - 447.
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  8. added 2014-03-17
    Politics in a State of Nature.William A. Edmundson - 2013 - Ratio Juris 26 (2):149-186.
    Aristotle thought we are by nature political animals, but the state-of-nature tradition sees political society not as natural but as an artifice. For this tradition, political society can usefully be conceived as emerging from a pre-political state of nature by the exercise of innate normative powers. Those powers, together with the rest of our native normative endowment, both make possible the construction of the state, and place sharp limits on the state's just powers and prerogatives. A state-of-nature theory has three (...)
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  9. added 2014-03-15
    Locke's State of Nature.Barry Hindess - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):1-20.
    Scholarly discussion has treated the account of the state of nature which Locke presents in his Second Treatise as neither an hypothesis nor a description but rather as a fiction. John Dunn, for example, claims that it is a `theoretical analysis of the fundamental relations of right and duty which obtain between human beings, relations which are logically prior to the particular historical situations in which all actual human beings always in fact find themselves'. Here Dunn presents a misleading account (...)
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  10. added 2014-03-04
    States of Nature.Matt Zwolinski - 2011 - Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (1):27-36.
    Whatever else might be said about the Lockean and Hobbesian states of nature, it is widely believe that they are mutually incompatible. One or the other (or neither) is a correct way of thinking about the state of nature, but not both. This paper argues that this intuitively plausible claim is incorrect - if not as a matter of textual interpretation, then as a matter of analysis of the concepts that we have inherited from those texts. Not only does it (...)
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  11. added 2013-10-29
    Locke's State of Nature.Chris Lazarski - 2013 - In Janusz Grygiencl (ed.), .Human Rights and Politics. Erida.
    Locke’s Second Treatise of Government lays the foundation for a fully liberal order that includes representative and limited government, and that guarantees basic civil liberties. Though future thinkers filled in some gaps left in his doctrine, such as division of powers between executive and judicial branch of government, as well as fuller exposition of economic freedom and human rights, it is Locke, who paves the way for others. The article reviews the Treatise, paying particular attention to his ingenious way to (...)
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  12. added 2013-08-14
    The Commodity Form and Socialization in Locke's State of Nature.E. Paul Colella - 1984 - International Studies in Philosophy 16 (3):1-13.
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  13. added 2013-08-13
    Locke, Eden and Two States of Nature: The Fortunate Fall Revisited.Philip Vogt - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):523-544.
    Locke, Eden and Two States of Nature: The Fortunate Fall Revisited PHILIP VOGT TWO STATES OF NATURE, not one, figure in the political writings of John Locke. The more frequently discussed of the two, the "State of Nature" proper, is defined in the second of the Two Treatises of Government as the condition of perfect freedom abandoned by mankind upon the advent of political society.' Whether Locke viewed this "state" as a purely theoretical construct or as an actual moment in (...)
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  14. added 2013-08-13
    “State of Nature” and the “Natural History” of Bourgeois Society. The Origins of Bourgeois Social Theory as a Philosophy of History and Social Science in Samuel Pufendorf, John Locke and Adam Smith.Bernd Warlich - 1974 - Philosophy and History 7 (2):153-157.
  15. added 2013-08-12
    Does Status Matter? The Contradictions in Locke’s Account of the State of Nature.Daniel Eggers - 2013 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 95 (1):87-105.
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