About this topic
Summary The content of this category can be found in the categories "Can machines think?" and "Machine consciousness." 
Key works The content of this category can be found in the categories "Can machines think?" and "Machine consciousness."  See those two for readings and references, also.
Introductions See the categories "Can machines think?" and "Machine consciousness"
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1 — 50 / 326
  1. added 2020-04-18
    Über ein die Maschinenmetapher des Menschen betreffendes Mißverständnis.Geert Keil - 1993 - In Jörg F. Maas (ed.), Das sichtbare Denken. Modelle und Modellhaftigkeit in der Philosophie und den Wissenschaften. Rodopi. pp. 75-89.
    Das Maschinenmodell des Menschen wurde im Aufklärungsmaterialismus des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts philosophisch etabliert. Die Mechanisten beanspruchten, die Funktionsweise des menschlichen Körpers, später auch die seines Geistes, in nichtmetaphysischer und nichtteleologischer Weise erklären zu können. Entgegen der communis opinio haben viele Mechanisten niemals antiteleologische Positionen vertreten. Die anderen haben ihre Ansprüche nicht einlösen können. Statt teleologische Beschreibungen überflüssig zu machen, haben sie, oft ungewollt und unbemerkt, in ihren eigenen Theorien auf teleologische Konzepte zurückgegriffen.
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  2. added 2020-01-22
    Gods of Transhumanism.Alex V. Halapsis - 2019 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 16:78-90.
    Purpose of the article is to identify the religious factor in the teaching of transhumanism, to determine its role in the ideology of this flow of thought and to identify the possible limits of technology interference in human nature. Theoretical basis. The methodological basis of the article is the idea of transhumanism. Originality. In the foreseeable future, robots will be able to pass the Turing test, become “electronic personalities” and gain political rights, although the question of the possibility of machine (...)
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  3. added 2019-11-22
    Utopias, Dolphins, and Computers: Problems of Philosophical Plumbing Mary Midgley New York: Routledge, 1996, X + 182 Pp., $22.95. [REVIEW]Kathleen Okruhlik - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (4):877-.
    This is a collection of twelve essays, most of which have appeared before in diverse places. They cover a broad range of topics and are loosely connected by a recurring set of themes. These themes are best understood as attacks by Midgley on certain characteristics of the philosophical enterprise as it is currently practised in the West. The tendencies and principles she calls into question include individualism, scholasticism, realism, instrumentalist conceptions of rationality, anthropocentrism, reductionism, scientism, and mechanism.
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  4. added 2019-09-16
    Crítica da Razão Positrônica.Sandro Rinaldi Feliciano - 2018 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do ABC
    Existe um horizonte à frente. Este horizonte está longe de ser aquele aqui descrito em sua forma, mas talvez o seja em sua essência. O que quero dizer com isso é que existe uma possibilidade de os cérebros positrônicos do título nunca existirem para além das brilhantes mentes que os conceberam na Ficção Científica, mas isto não quer dizer que não existirão sistemas análogos em suas funções, principalmente quanto à racionalidade. A Crítica da Razão Positrônica é um texto que tem (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    Nano-Enabled AI: Some Philosophical Issues.J. Storrs Hall - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):247-261.
    Improvements in computational hardware enabled by nanotechnology promise a dual revolution in coming decades: machines which are both more intelligent and more numerous than human beings. This possibility raises substantial concern over the moral nature of such intelligent machines. An analysis of the prospects involves at least two key philosophical issues. The first, intentionality in formal systems, turns on whether a “mere machine” can be a mind whose thoughts have true meaning and understanding. Second, what is the moral nature of (...)
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Embodied Mind: On Computational, Evolutionary, and Philosophical Interpretations of Cognition.Klaus Mainzer - 2005 - Synthesis Philosophica 20 (2):389-406.
    Modern cognitive science cannot be understood without recent developments in computer science, artificial intelligence, robotics, neuroscience, biology, linguistics, and psychology. Classic analytic philosophy as well as traditional AI assumed that all kinds of knowledge must eplicitly be represented by formal or programming languages. This assumption is in contradiction to recent insights into the biology of evolution and developmental psychology of the human organism. Most of our knowledge is implicit and unconscious. It is not formally represented, but embodied knowledge which is (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    James H. Fetzer, Computers and Cognition: Why Minds Are Not Machines, Dordrecht: Kluwer, 2001, Xix + 323 Pp., $128.00 , ISBN 0-792-36615-8. [REVIEW]Richard Wyatt - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (3):435-441.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    Ken Richardson, the Making of Intelligence. Maps of the Mind. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. Pp. VIII+210. Isbn 0-231-12004-4. $24.95. [REVIEW]R. G. A. Dolby - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Science 35 (2):213-250.
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Narrow Versus Wide Mechanism: Including a Re-Examination of Turing’s Views on the Mind-Machine Issue.B. Jack Copeland - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):5-32.
  10. added 2019-06-06
    An Exploration Into Teaching with Computers.Ludwik Kowalski - 1995 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 14 (3):64-71.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    What Computers Still Can’T Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason. [REVIEW]Bob Welham - 1994 - Cogito 8 (1):97-99.
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    Review of Artificial Intelligence and Human Reason: A Teleological Critique. [REVIEW]John M. Ford - 1991 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):126-130.
    Reviews the book, Artificial intelligence and human reason: A teleological critique by J. F. Rychlak. There is a frequent lack of communication between artificial intelligence practitioners and critics. Joseph Rychlak's latest book is an attempt to contribute productively to this exchange. He introduces his work by stating: "I think it is relatively easy to write a superficial book "picking" on the computer as somehow inadequate to the description of human beings. Overall, Rychlak provides a sufficiently detailed criticism of computational approaches (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Computers and Self-Knowledge.Theodore W. Schick Jr - 1989 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 64 (2):137-145.
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    Technology and Instruments Simon Lavington, Early British Computers: The Story of Vintage Computers and the People Who Built Them. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1980. Pp. Iv + 139. £3.95. [REVIEW]Graham Hollister-Short - 1983 - British Journal for the History of Science 16 (2):208-209.
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    Mentality in Machines.J. O. Wisdom, R. J. Spilsbury & D. M. Mackay - 1952 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 26 (1):1-86.
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  16. added 2019-02-23
    Review of I Am a Strange Loop by Douglas Hofstadter (2007) (Review Revised 2019).Michael Starks - 2019 - In Suicidal Utopian Delusions in the 21st Century-- Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization -- Articles and Reviews 2006-2019 4th Edition Michael Starks. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 217-235.
    Latest Sermon from the Church of Fundamentalist Naturalism by Pastor Hofstadter. Like his much more famous (or infamous for its relentless philosophical errors) work Godel, Escher, Bach, it has a superficial plausibility but if one understands that this is rampant scientism which mixes real scientific issues with philosophical ones (i.e., the only real issues are what language games we ought to play) then almost all its interest disappears. I provide a framework for analysis based in evolutionary psychology and the work (...)
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  17. added 2019-02-11
    Machine Learning and Irresponsible Inference: Morally Assessing the Training Data for Image Recognition Systems.Owen King - 2019 - In Matteo Vincenzo D'Alfonso & Don Berkich (eds.), On the Cognitive, Ethical, and Scientific Dimensions of Artificial Intelligence. Springer Verlag. pp. 265-282.
    Just as humans can draw conclusions responsibly or irresponsibly, so too can computers. Machine learning systems that have been trained on data sets that include irresponsible judgments are likely to yield irresponsible predictions as outputs. In this paper I focus on a particular kind of inference a computer system might make: identification of the intentions with which a person acted on the basis of photographic evidence. Such inferences are liable to be morally objectionable, because of a way in which they (...)
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  18. added 2019-02-07
    Robots, Autonomy, and Responsibility.Raul Hakli & Pekka Mäkelä - 2016 - In Johanna Seibt, Marco Nørskov & Søren Schack Andersen (eds.), What Social Robots Can and Should Do: Proceedings of Robophilosophy 2016. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: IOS Press. pp. 145-154.
    We study whether robots can satisfy the conditions for agents fit to be held responsible in a normative sense, with a focus on autonomy and self-control. An analogy between robots and human groups enables us to modify arguments concerning collective responsibility for studying questions of robot responsibility. On the basis of Alfred R. Mele’s history-sensitive account of autonomy and responsibility it can be argued that even if robots were to have all the capacities usually required of moral agency, their history (...)
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  19. added 2018-06-15
    Giving Robots a Voice: Testimony, Intentionality, and the Law.Billy Wheeler - 2017 - In Steve Thompson & Steven John Thompson (eds.), Androids, Cyborgs, and Robots in Contemporary Society and Culture. Hershey, PA, USA: pp. 1-34.
    Humans are becoming increasingly dependent on the ‘say-so' of machines, such as computers, smartphones, and robots. In epistemology, knowledge based on what you have been told is called ‘testimony' and being able to give and receive testimony is a prerequisite for engaging in many social roles. Should robots and other autonomous intelligent machines be considered epistemic testifiers akin to those of humans? This chapter attempts to answer this question as well as explore the implications of robot testimony for the criminal (...)
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  20. added 2018-02-18
    Machine Ethics.M. Anderson & S. Anderson (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge Univ. Press.
    The essays in this volume represent the first steps by philosophers and artificial intelligence researchers toward explaining why it is necessary to add an ...
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  21. added 2018-02-16
    Assessing Artificial Consciousness.Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart, Tom Ziemke, Ron Chrisley & Uziel Awret - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti book, and include (...)
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  22. added 2018-02-16
    What Role Do the Emotions Play in Cognition? Towards a New Alternative to Cognitive Theories of Emotion.Jason L. Megill - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):81-100.
    This paper has two aims: (1) to point the way towards a novel alternative to cognitive theories of emotion, and (2) to delineate a number of different functions that the emotions play in cognition, functions that become visible from outside the framework of cognitive theories. First, I hold that the Higher Order Representational (HOR) theories of consciousness — as generally formulated — are inadequate insofar as they fail to account for selective attention. After posing this dilemma, I resolve it in (...)
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  23. added 2017-08-31
    On the Matter of Robot Minds.Brian P. McLaughlin & David Rose - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy.
    The view that phenomenally conscious robots are on the horizon often rests on a certain philosophical view about consciousness, one we call “nomological behaviorism.” The view entails that, as a matter of nomological necessity, if a robot had exactly the same patterns of dispositions to peripheral behavior as a phenomenally conscious being, then the robot would be phenomenally conscious; indeed it would have all and only the states of phenomenal consciousness that the phenomenally conscious being in question has. We experimentally (...)
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  24. added 2017-02-15
    Are We Computers?: A Wittgensteinian Approach.John-Michael Kuczynski - 2003 - Existentia 13 (3-4):219-238.
  25. added 2017-02-15
    Can Computers Think?John R. Searle - 2002 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oup Usa.
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  26. added 2017-02-15
    Life-Worlds and Social Relations in Computers.László Ropolyi - 1999 - AI and Society 13 (1-2):69-87.
  27. added 2017-02-15
    Yorick A. Wilks, Brian M. Slater, and Louise M. Guthrie, Electric Words: Dictionaries, Computers and Meanings.H. Geirsson - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7:312-315.
  28. added 2017-02-15
    Graham Button, Jeff Coulter, John RE Lee, and Wes Sharrock, Computers, Minds, and Conduct.G. M. Gottfried & S. Traiger - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7:129-133.
  29. added 2017-02-14
    The First Computers-History and Architectures.D. Wood - 2003 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 16 (3):168-169.
  30. added 2017-02-14
    Lives of the Mind: The Use and Abuse of Intelligence.Nemoianu Virgil - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):152-153.
    The author of this collection of essays is known as managing editor and regular contributor to the New Criterion, a substantial monthly that has been appearing for twenty-one years and was founded in order to bring a voice of reason and balance inside the agitated and disoriented activities of American intellectual and academic life. The New Criterion sees as one of its central duties the defense of “high-modernist” literature and art against deconstructive “post-modernist” tendencies. Nevertheless, it is also successful in (...)
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  31. added 2017-02-14
    It Don't Mean a Thing: On What Computers Have to Say.Wes Sharrock & Wil Coleman - 2000 - Communication and Cognition. Monographies 33 (1-2):83-95.
  32. added 2017-02-14
    Talking Back to the Machine: Computers and Human Aspiration.P. Ceruzzi - 1999 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 12 (3):115-116.
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  33. added 2017-02-14
    Computers Near the Threshold.Martin Gardener - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (1):89-94.
    The notion that it is possible to construct intelligent machines out of nonorganic material is as old as Greek mythology. Vulcan, the lame god of fire, fabricated young women out of gold to assist him in his labours. He also made the bronze giant Talus, who guarded the island of Crete by running around it three times a day and heaving huge rocks at enemy ships. A single vein of ichor ran from Talus's neck to his heels. He bled to (...)
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  34. added 2017-02-14
    Thinking Computers and the Problem of Intentionality.Eric Dietrich - 1994 - In Thinking Computers and Virtual Persons. Academic Press.
  35. added 2017-02-14
    Computers and Philosophers.Gary Clark - 1985 - Philosophy Today 29 (4):332-338.
  36. added 2017-02-14
    Computers as Universal Mimics.Timothy Clark - 1985 - Philosophy Today 29 (4):302-318.
  37. added 2017-02-13
    What Are Computers (If They're Not Thinking Things)?John Preston - unknown
  38. added 2017-02-13
    A Case Study of Low‐Status Women’s Attitudes Towards Computers.Ruey S. Shieh, Sung‐Lu Chang & Eric Zhi‐Feng Liu - 2011 - Educational Studies 37 (2):233-243.
    This study investigates the attitudes of a group of low‐status women towards computers through a deliberately designed computer training programme. Four aspects of the women’s attitudes were examined, including computer anxiety, confidence, liking and usefulness. Data sources consist of pre‐ and post‐surveys and interviews with the participants. The results show that the participants’ attitudes towards computers improved greatly after attending the training course, especially in terms of the aspect of anxiety. It was also found that the instructor’s patience, repeated step‐by‐step (...)
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  39. added 2017-02-13
    Do We All Look Alike to Computers?Robert L. Goldstone - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):55-57.
  40. added 2017-02-13
    Computers and Biology.Harold Morowitz - 2003 - Complexity 9 (1):11-12.
  41. added 2017-02-13
    Computers, Science, and the Microsoft Case.Barry Fagin - 1999 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 29 (2):15-22.
  42. added 2017-02-13
    Computers and Employment.Inna Shostak - 1996 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 26 (1):21-24.
  43. added 2017-02-13
    An Essay on Philosophy and Computers.K. Pstruzina - 1995 - Filozofia 50 (5):284-289.
  44. added 2017-02-13
    Dreyfus, HL, 3% Dreyfus, SE, 396.J. W. Cornman, G. Cottrell, R. Cummins, A. Cussins, L. Darden, C. Darwin, W. Demopoulos, M. Derthick, H. Gardner & M. S. Gazzaniga - 1993 - In Scott M. Christensen & Dale R. Turner (eds.), Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. L. Erlbaum.
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  45. added 2017-02-13
    Teaching Computers and Society in a Virtual Classroom.S. R. Hiltz & Murray Turoff - 1990 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 20 (3):69-72.
  46. added 2017-02-13
    Computers and Society: An Integrated Course Model.William J. Joel - 1989 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 19 (1):11-14.
  47. added 2017-02-13
    Putting Computers in Their Place.Hubert Dreyfus & Stuart Dreyfus - 1986 - Social Research 53.
  48. added 2017-02-13
    Computers, Society, and Nicaragua.David Bellin - 1986 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 15 (4):38-38.
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  49. added 2017-02-13
    Computers and Cultural Change.L. K. Englehart - 1986 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 16 (1):17-18.
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  50. added 2017-02-13
    Computers and Democracy.H. L. Berghel & D. L. Sallach - 1983 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 13 (2):12-16.
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1 — 50 / 326