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  1. added 2019-02-02
    Review of Deborah A. Boyle, The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2).
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  2. added 2018-10-03
    Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Infinitude of Nature.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (3):219-239.
    In this paper, I develop a new interpretation of the order of nature, its function, and its implications in Margaret Cavendish’s philosophy. According to the infinite balance account, the order of nature consists in a balance among the infinite varieties of nature. That is, for Cavendish, nature contains an infinity of different types of matter: infinite species, shapes, and motions. The potential tumult implicated by such a variety, however, is tempered by the counterbalancing of the different kinds and motions of (...)
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  3. added 2018-02-17
    Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century.Jacqueline Broad - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  4. added 2018-02-16
    Two Opponents of Material Atomism.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. pp. 35--50.
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  5. added 2017-08-23
    Review of Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy, Edited by Eugene Marshall. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):617-9.
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  6. added 2017-05-30
    Visual Perception as Patterning: Cavendish Against Hobbes on Sensation.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):193-214.
    Many of Margaret Cavendish’s criticisms of Thomas Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters (1664) relate to the disorder and damage that she holds would result if Hobbesian pressure were the cause of visual perception. In this paper, I argue that her “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV is aimed at a different goal: to show the explanatory potency of her account. First, I connect Cavendish’s view of visual perception as “patterning” to the “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV. Second, (...)
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  7. added 2017-02-13
    Distributing Discovery' Between Watt and Cavendish: A Reassessment of the Nineteenth-Century 'Water Controversy.David Philip Miller - 2002 - Annals of Science 59 (2):149-178.
    Contention about who discovered the compound nature of water occurred in two phases. During the first phase, in the 1780s, the claimants to the discovery produced the work on which their claims were based. This phase of controversy was relatively short and did not generate much heat, although it was part of the larger debates surrounding the 'chemical revolution'. The second phase of controversy, in the 1830s and 1840s, saw heated exchanges in Britain between advocates of Watt on the one (...)
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  8. added 2017-02-09
    Blessed Margaret Clitherow.Helene Magaret - 1948 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 23 (3):499-500.
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  9. added 2017-01-29
    The Domestication of Royalist Themes in The Concealed Fancies by Jane Cavendish and Elizabeth Brackley.Kamille Stanton - 2007 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 36 (2):177-198.
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  10. added 2017-01-29
    J. J. Thomson And The Cavendish Laboratory. [REVIEW]D. Chilton - 1965 - British Journal for the History of Science 2 (3):266-266.
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  11. added 2017-01-29
    Cole, G. D. H., and Margaret, A Guide to Modern Politics.Field Field - 1935 - Studies in Philosophy and Social Science 4:132.
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  12. added 2017-01-28
    A History of the Cavendish Laboratory. [REVIEW]Morris R. Cohen - 1912 - Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):79.
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  13. added 2017-01-27
    “Listen Now All and Understand”: Adaptation of Hagiographical Material for Vernacular Audiences in the Old English Lives of St. Margaret.Hugh Magennis - 1996 - Speculum 71 (1):27-42.
    The two extant Old English lives of the virgin-martyr St. Margaret of Antioch, in London, British Library, Cotton Tiberius A. iii, and Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Library 303, reflect the specific interest in this saint that appears to have developed in England in the late Anglo-Saxon period. More broadly, they are representative of the widely evident interest in this period in making hagiographical material available, in prose, to vernacular audiences. Although Ælfric played the leading part in that enterprise, numerous translations (...)
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  14. added 2017-01-27
    The Cavendish Laboratory 1874–1974. [REVIEW]J. B. Morrell - 1976 - British Journal for the History of Science 9 (1):71-72.
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  15. added 2017-01-27
    The Electrical Researches of the Honourable Henry Cavendish. [REVIEW]Russell Mccormmach - 1969 - British Journal for the History of Science 4 (4):408-409.
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  16. added 2017-01-26
    Advanced College Writing Dr. Rogers 8 November 2008 Ethos and Authorship in “The Ghastly Ordeal of Timothy Cavendish”.Michael Madson - forthcoming - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology.
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  17. added 2017-01-26
    Margaret J. Osler.Divine Will - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press. pp. 145.
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  18. added 2017-01-26
    Margaret Benyon.Holography as Art & An Automatic Eden - 1989 - In Richard Kostelanetz (ed.), Esthetics Contemporary. Prometheus Books.
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  19. added 2017-01-25
    Medicating" Margaret".Coleen Reid - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):340.
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  20. added 2017-01-17
    Margaret Cavendish: Gender, Science and Politics.Lisa Walters - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    It is often thought that the numerous contradictory perspectives in Margaret Cavendish's writings demonstrate her inability to reconcile her feminism with her conservative, royalist politics. In this book Lisa Walters challenges this view and demonstrates that Cavendish's ideas more closely resemble republican thought, and that her methodology is the foundation for subversive political, scientific and gender theories. With an interdisciplinary focus Walters closely examines Cavendish's work and its context, providing the reader with an enriched understanding of women's contribution to early (...)
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  21. added 2017-01-17
    Margaret Cavendish.Deborah Boyle - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 60:63-65.
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  22. added 2017-01-17
    Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings.Susan James (ed.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, published a wide variety of works including poems, plays, letters and treatises of natural philosophy, but her significance as a political writer has only recently been recognised. This major contribution to the series of Cambridge Texts includes the first ever modern edition of her Divers Orations on English social and political life, together with a new student-friendly rendition of her imaginary voyage, A New World called the Blazing World. Susan James explains the allusions made in (...)
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  23. added 2017-01-16
    Brandie R. Siegfried; Lisa T. Sarasohn . God and Nature in the Thought of Margaret Cavendish. Xvi + 257 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2014. £65. [REVIEW]Sarah Hutton - 2016 - Isis 107 (1):168-170.
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  24. added 2017-01-16
    "The Convent of Pleasure" and Other Plays. Margaret Cavendish, Anne Shaver.Lisa T. Sarasohn - 2001 - Isis 92 (3):609-609.
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  25. added 2017-01-16
    Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind. Anna Battigelli.Lisa T. Sarasohn - 1999 - Isis 90 (4):809-810.
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  26. added 2017-01-16
    Margaret Lucas Cavendish, Grounds of Natural Philosophy, with an Introduction by Colette V. Michael. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill Press, 1995. Pp. Xx+311. ISBN 0-933951-66-3. $38.00. [REVIEW]David Knight - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Science 31 (1):63-102.
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  27. added 2017-01-16
    Henry Cavendish on the Theory of Heat.Russell McCormmach - 1988 - Isis 79 (1):37-67.
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  28. added 2017-01-16
    The Cavendish Laboratory 1874-1974J. G. Crowther.Thaddeus J. Trenn - 1976 - Isis 67 (2):287-289.
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  29. added 2017-01-16
    Henry Cavendish: His Life and Scientific WorkA. J. Berry.L. Pearce Williams - 1962 - Isis 53 (2):255-256.
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  30. added 2017-01-15
    Margaret Cavendish: Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy.Eileen O'Neill (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Margaret Cavendish's 1668 edition of Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, presented here in a 2001 edition, holds a unique position in early modern philosophy. Cavendish rejects the Aristotelianism which was taught in the universities in the seventeenth century, and the picture of nature as a grand machine which was propounded by Hobbes, Descartes and members of the Royal Society of London, such as Boyle. She also rejects the views of nature which make reference to immaterial spirits. Instead she develops an original (...)
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  31. added 2017-01-14
    Speculative Truth: Henry Cavendish, Natural Philosophy and the Rise of Modern Theoretical Science.Russell McCormmach - 2003 - Oxford University Press USA.
    With a never-before published paper by Lord Henry Cavendish, as well as a biography on him, this book offers a fascinating discourse on the rise of scientific attitudes and ways of knowing. A pioneering British physicist in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Cavendish was widely considered to be the first full-time scientist in the modern sense. Through the lens of this unique thinker and writer, this book is about the birth of modern science.
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  32. added 2016-10-07
    Women, Liberty, and Forms of Feminism.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen (eds.), Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter shows how Mary Astell and Margaret Cavendish can reasonably be understood as early feminists in three senses of the term. First, they are committed to the natural equality of men and women, and related, they are committed to equal opportunity of education for men and women. Second, they are committed to social structures that help women develop authentic selves and thus autonomy understood in one sense of the word. Third, they acknowledge the power of production relationships, especially friendships (...)
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  33. added 2016-08-22
    ‘Exploding’ Immaterial Substances: Margaret Cavendish’s Vitalist-Materialist Critique of Spirits.Emma Wilkins - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):858-877.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I explore Margaret Cavendish’s engagement with mid-seventeenth-century debates on spirits and spiritual activity in the world, especially the problems of incorporeal substance and magnetism. I argue that between 1664 and 1668, Cavendish developed an increasingly robust form of materialism in response to the deficiencies which she identified in alternative philosophical systems – principally mechanical philosophy and vitalism. This was an intriguing direction of travel, given the intensification in attacks on the supposedly atheistic materialism of Hobbes. While some (...)
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  34. added 2016-03-03
    Margaret Cavendish, Environmental Ethics, and Panpsychism.Stewart Duncan - manuscript
    Margaret Cavendish (1623-73) held a number of surprising philosophical views. These included a materialist panpsychism, and some views in what we might call environmental ethics. Panpsychism, though certainly not unheard of, is still often a surprising view. Views in environmental ethics - even just views that involve a measure of environmental concern - are unusual to find in early modern European philosophy. Cavendish held both of these surprising views. One might suspect that panpsychism provides some reasons for environmental concern. I (...)
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  35. added 2016-02-29
    Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):493-505.
    Many scholars point to the close association between early modern science and the rise of rational arguments in favour of the existence of witches. For some commentators, it is a poor reflection on science that its methods so easily lent themselves to the unjust persecution of innocent men and women. In this paper, I examine a debate about witches between a woman philosopher, Margaret Cavendish , and a fellow of the Royal Society, Joseph Glanvill . I argue that Cavendish is (...)
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  36. added 2015-12-31
    Cavendish, Margaret.Eugene Marshall - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Margaret Cavendish Margaret Lucas Cavendish, the Duchess of Newcastle, was a philosopher, poet, playwright and essayist. Her philosophical writings were concerned mostly with issues of metaphysics and natural philosophy, but also extended to social and political concerns. Like Hobbes and Descartes, she rejected what she took to be the occult explanations of the Scholastics. […].
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  37. added 2015-10-19
    Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23:325-327.
  38. added 2015-10-19
    Paper Bodies: A Margaret Cavendish Reader.Sylvia Bowerbank & Sara Mendelson - 2000 - Utopian Studies 11 (2):231-233.
  39. added 2015-10-19
    Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind by Anna Battigelli. [REVIEW]Lisa Sarasohn - 1999 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 90:809-810.
  40. added 2015-10-14
    Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind.Anna Battigelli - 2000 - Utopian Studies 11 (1):139-142.
  41. added 2015-10-09
    First Words and Second Thoughts: Margaret Cavendish, Humphrey Moseley, and "the Book".Randall Ingram - 2000 - Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:101-124.
    Each word in the phrase "the history of the book" raises questions, even the definite articles: What does "the" book look like? How is it made? How is it read? Who or what distinguishes "the" book from "a" book? Surely the founding scholars of "the history of the book" did not mean for these definite articles to be read so literally or so archly, and in practice, scholars like Roger Chartier and Roger Darnton privilege study of particular books over generalizations (...)
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  42. added 2015-08-17
    Cavendish.David Cunning - 2016 - Routledge.
    Margaret Cavendish was a philosopher, poet, scientist, novelist, and playwright of the seventeenth century. Her work is important for a number of reasons. It presents an early and compelling version of the naturalism that is found in current-day philosophy; it offers important insights that bear on recent discussions of the nature and characteristics of intelligence and the question of whether or not the bodies that surround us are intelligent or have an intelligent cause; it anticipates some of the central views (...)
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  43. added 2015-08-17
    ‘Two Opposite Things Placed Near Each Other, Are the Better Discerned’: Philosophical Readings of Cavendish's Literary Output.Carlos Santana - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):297-317.
    Seventeenth-century philosopher Margaret Cavendish wrote not only several philosophical treatises, but also many fictional works. I argue for taking the latter as serious objects of study for historians of philosophy, and sketch a method for doing so. Cavendish's fiction is full of conflicting viewpoints, and many authors have argued that this demonstrates that she did not intend her literary works to serve serious philosophical purpose. But if we consider philosophers more central to the canon, such as Plato or Kierkegaard, who (...)
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  44. added 2015-07-13
    Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion.Deborah Boyle - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception as (...)
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  45. added 2015-04-20
    A Princely Brave Woman: Essays On Margaret Cavendish, Duchess Of Newcastle; Authorial Conquests: Essays On Genre In The Writing Of Margaret Cavendish; Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings. [REVIEW]Hilda Smith - 2006 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 36 (1):122-129.
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  46. added 2015-04-20
    Physical Fictions: Margaret Cavendish and Her Material Soul.Jay R. Stevenson - 1997 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    This study discusses the importance of the idea of the material soul in the writings of Margaret Cavendish and, more broadly, in the literature of early modern England, showing that the seemingly arcane notion that discourse is the product of the psychic mechanism was central to Cavendish's works. I suggest that cultural proscriptions against early modern women's discourse were more complex than has been recognized. These proscriptions were both supported and made problematic by conflicting ideas about the nature of the (...)
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  47. added 2015-03-16
    *The Convent Of Pleasure and Other Plays* by Margaret Cavendish (Ed., Anne Shaver). [REVIEW]Lisa Sarasohn - 2001 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:609-609.
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  48. added 2014-11-24
    Minds Everywhere: Margaret Cavendish's Anti-Mechanist Materialism.Stewart Duncan - manuscript
    This paper considers Margaret Cavendish's distinctive anti-mechanist materialism, focusing on her 1664 Philosophical Letters, in which she discusses the views of Hobbes, Descartes, and More, among others. The paper examines Cavendish's views about natural, material souls: the soul of nature, the souls of finite individuals, and the relation between them. After briefly digressing to look at Cavendish's views about divine, supernatural souls, the paper then turns to the reasons for Cavendish's disagreement with mechanist accounts. There are disagreements over the explanation (...)
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  49. added 2014-05-12
    Cavendish, van Helmont, and the Mad Raging Womb.Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - In Judy A. Hayden (ed.), The New Science and Women’s Literary Discourse: Prefiguring Frankenstein. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 47-63.
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  50. added 2014-04-14
    Margaret Cavendish's Exploration of Consciousness in Her Writings.Cynthia Lynne Rogan de Ramirez - unknown
    Writing at a time when women had few property rights, were given scarce educational opportunities, and were viewed as incorrigibly irrational, the largely autodidactic English intellectual Margaret Cavendish is fascinated by knowledge and how to secure for herself a place in the micro- as well as macrocosmic community of letters. In particular, Cavendish holds an abiding interest in what we now call "consciousness" which she attributes to every piece of matter. Throughout the universe, the three aspects of matter--inanimate, sensate, and (...)
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1 — 50 / 77