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  1. Carbon Fee Fail-Safe and Safeguard.P. Olcott - manuscript
    The fail-safe makes sure the fee is high enough to meet carbon emission reduction targets. The safeguard keeps the fee from getting any higher than needed. -/- One of the ways that we could account for the unpredictability of the price elasticity of demand for carbon would be to provide a fail-safe mechanism to ensure that we definitely stay on the carbon reduction schedule. If we keep Energy Innovation Act (HR 763) essentially as it is and scale up the annual (...)
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  2. Making Carbon Fee Just Steep Enough to Meet Emission Reduction Targets.P. Olcott - manuscript
    One of the ways that we could account for the unpredictability of the price elasticity of demand for carbon would be to provide a fail-safe mechanism to ensure that we definitely stay on the carbon reduction schedule. If we kept Energy Innovation Act (HR 763) essentially as it is and scale up the annual carbon fee increase by Number-of-Years-Behind-Schedule * 0.15.
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  3. Money, Markets, Morality: Dvd.Ken Knisely, David Haslett & Ronald Duska - unknown - Milk Bottle Productions.
    How should we evaluate the economic environment we live in? Does anyone really believe in capitalism? How good are the philosophical judgments that inform the structures and habits of our economic lives? With David Schweickart , David Haslett , and Ronald Duska.
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  4. The Choice of Efficiencies and the Necessity of Politics.Michael Bennett - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-20.
    Efficiency requires legislative political institutions. There are many ways efficiency can be promoted, and so an ongoing legislative institution is necessary to resolve this choice in a politically sustainable and economically flexible way. This poses serious problems for classical liberal proposals to constitutionally protect markets from government intervention, as seen in the work of Ilya Somin, Guido Pincione & Fernando Tesón and others. The argument for the political nature of efficiency is set out in terms of both Pareto optimality and (...)
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  5. A Market Model for the Analysis of Ecumenicity.Peter L. Berger - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  6. Comment on" New Problems for the United States in the World Economy".Peter L. Bernstein - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  7. Forthcoming.“How Not to Defend the Market,”.Walter E. Block - forthcoming - Journal of Libertarian Studies.
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  8. Still Primus Inter Pares for Understanding and Opposing the Capitalist System.Richard A. Brosio - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
  9. The Global Financial Crisis: Emerging Markets 'Prospects for Economic Recovery and Democratic Transformations'.Ceslav Ciobanu - forthcoming - Cogito.
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  10. " On the Parasitic Character of Wage Labor and Post-Fordist Semblance.Paolo Cirno & Max Henninger - forthcoming - Substance.
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  11. Why the" Papen Plan" for Economic Recovery Failed.Gerhard Colm - forthcoming - Social Research.
  12. From Estimates of National Income to Projections of the Nation's Budget.Gerhard Colm - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  13. Domination and Misframing in the Refugee Regime.Jamie Draper - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
  14. A Blocked Exchange? Investment Citizenship and the Limits of the Commodification Objection.Lior Erez - forthcoming - In Investment Migration: The Law of Citizenship and Money.
    Critics of investment citizenship often appeal to the idea that citizenship should not be commodified. This chapter clarifies how the different arguments in support of this Commodification Objection are best understood as versions of wider claims in the literature on the moral limits of markets (MLM). Through an analysis of the three main objections – The Wrong Distribution Argument, The Value Degradation Argument, and the Motivational Corruption Argument – it claims that these objections rely on flawed and partial interpretations of (...)
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  15. Fake News and Epistemic Vice: Combating a Uniquely Noxious Market.Megan Fritts & Frank Cabrera - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    The topic of fake news has received increased attention from philosophers since the term became a favorite of politicians (Habgood-Coote 2016; Dentith 2016). Notably missing from the conversation, however, is a discussion of fake news and conspiracy theory media as a market. This paper will take as its starting point the account of noxious markets put forward by Debra Satz (2010), and will argue that there is a pro tanto moral reason to restrict the market for fake news. Specifically, we (...)
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  16. Planning and the Market System.Eduard Heimann - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  17. Money, Markets, Morality: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, David Schweickart, David Haslett & Ronald Duska - forthcoming - DVD.
    How should we evaluate the economic environment we live in? Does anyone really believe in capitalism? How good are the philosophical judgments that inform the structures and habits of our economic lives? With David Schweickart , David Haslett , and Ronald Duska.
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  18. New Literature on Money, Credit and Banking, 1933–1935.Fritz Lehmann - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  19. Personhood and Vulnerability: Understanding Social Attitudes Towards Dementia.McNess Ann-Marie - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-6.
  20. Carbon Pricing and COVID-19.Kian Mintz-Woo, Francis Dennig, Hongxun Liu & Thomas Schinko - forthcoming - Climate Policy.
    [Article currently freely available to all at the DOI link below] A question arising from the COVID-19 crisis is whether the merits of cases for climate policies have been affected. This article focuses on carbon pricing, in the form of either carbon taxes or emissions trading. It discusses the extent to which relative costs and benefits of introducing carbon pricing may have changed in the context of COVID-19, during both the crisis and the recovery period to follow. In several ways, (...)
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  21. Automation, Basic Income and Merit.Katharina Nieswandt - forthcoming - In Keith Breen & Jean-Philippe Deranty (eds.), Whither Work? The Politics and Ethics of Contemporary Work.
    A recent wave of academic and popular publications say that utopia is within reach: Automation will progress to such an extent and include so many high-skill tasks that much human work will soon become superfluous. The gains from this highly automated economy, authors suggest, could be used to fund a universal basic income (UBI). Today's employees would live off the robots' products and spend their days on intrinsically valuable pursuits. I argue that this prediction is unlikely to come true. Historical (...)
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  22. Ethical Issues in the Policy Response to the 2008 Financial Crisis.Alojzy Z. Nowak & Patrick O'Sullivan - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A Critical Approach: Integrating Ethics Across the Business World.
  23. Village Banking Performance: A Comparative Review, 1994–1998.Judith Painter - forthcoming - Nexus.
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  24. Symbiosis and the Humanitarian Marketplace: The Changing Political Economy of 'Mutual Benefit'.Carlos Palacios - forthcoming - Theory, Culture and Society:026327642110001.
    This article develops a diagnostic lens to make sense of the still baffling development of a ‘humanitarian marketplace’. Ambivalently hybrid initiatives such as volunteer tourism, corporate social responsibility or even fair trade do not strictly obey a distributive logic of market exchange, social reciprocity or philanthropic giving. They engender a type of ‘economy’ that must be apprehended in its own terms. The article argues that the large-scale collaborative effects of such a dispersed market can be theorized without resorting to the (...)
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  25. Central Banking in Contemporary Capitalism: Monetary Policy and its Limits.Demophanes Papadatos - forthcoming - Historical Materialism.
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  26. David Schweickart, Against Capitalism.M. Roberts - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
  27. Reading Rawls Rightly: A Theory of Justice at 50.Robert S. Taylor - forthcoming - Polity.
    A half-century of Rawls interpreters have overemphasized economic equality in A Theory of Justice, slighting liberty—the central value of liberalism—in the process. From luck-egalitarian readings of Rawls to more recent claims that Rawls was a “reticent socialist,” these interpretations have obscured Rawls’s identity as a philosopher of freedom. They have also obscured the perhaps surprising fact that Rawlsian liberties (basic and non-basic) restrain and even undermine that same economic equality. As I will show in this article, such undermining occurs in (...)
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  28. Exchange Rates Within a Common Market.Leland B. Yeager - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  29. Undercutting Justice – Why Legal Representation Should Not Be Allocated by the Market.Shai Agmon - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (1):99-123.
    The adversarial legal system is traditionally praised for its normative appeal: it protects individual rights; ensures an equal, impartial, and consistent application of the law; and, most importantly, its competitive structure facilitates the discovery of truth – both in terms of the facts, and in terms of the correct interpretation of the law. At the same time, legal representation is allocated as a commodity, bought and sold in the market: the more one pays, the better legal representation one gets. In (...)
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  30. The political theory of neoliberalism.William Callison - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):36-40.
  31. The morals of the market: Human rights and the rise of neoliberalism.Ben Golder - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):32-35.
  32. Republicanism and Domination by Capital.Mark Losoncz & Szilárd János Tóth - 2021 - In Vesna Stanković Pejnović (ed.), Beyond Neoliberalism and Capitalism. Belgrád, Szerbia: pp. 141-156..
    This article is a review of the contemporary ‘leftist’ republican project. The project stands on two legs, and we examine them both in turn. The first leg is a novel reading of history. This reading suggests, on the one hand that, contrary to some popular assumptions, republicanism does have a leftist, even a radical stream. But on the other hand, it also suggests that several authors and movements that did not self-identify as republicans actually did, in fact, employ a characteristically (...)
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  33. The Value of Fairness and the Wrong of Wage Exploitation.Brian Berkey - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (3):414-429.
    In a recent article in this journal, David Faraci argues that the value of fairness can plausibly be appealed to in order to vindicate the view that consensual, mutually beneficial employment relationships can be wrongfully exploitative, even if employers have no obligation to hire or otherwise benefit those who are badly off enough to be vulnerable to wage exploitation. In this commentary, I argue that several values provide potentially strong grounds for thinking that it is at least sometimes better, morally (...)
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  34. Generalized Trust in Taiwan and (as Evidence for) Hirschman’s Doux Commerce Thesis.Marc A. Cohen - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (1):1-25.
    Data from the World Values Survey shows that generalized trust in Mainland China—trust in out-group members—is very low, but generalized trust in Taiwan is much higher. The present article argues that positive interactions with out-group members in the context of Taiwan’s export-oriented economy fostered generalized trust—and so explains this difference. This line of argument provides evidence for Albert O. Hirschman’s doux commerce thesis, that market interaction can improve persons and even stabilize the social order. The present article defends this point (...)
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  35. Markets, Morals, and Virtues: Evidential and Conceptual Issues.Roberto Fumagalli - 2020 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 13 (1).
  36. The Power of Money: Critical Theory, Capitalism, and the Politics of Debt.Steven Klein - 2020 - Constellations 27 (1):19-35.
  37. The Market, Competition, and Structural Exploitation.Hannes Kuch - 2020 - Constellations 27 (1):95-110.
  38. Why Outcomes Matter: Reclaiming Distributive Justice.Peter Lindsay - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (4):445-467.
  39. Value, Externalities, and the Boundaries of the Market.Andrew Stark - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):180-204.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  40. How Propaganda Became Public Relations: Foucault and the Corporate Government of the Public.Cory Wimberly - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    How Propaganda Became Public Relations pulls back the curtain on propaganda: how it was born, how it works, and how it has masked the bulk of its operations by rebranding itself as public relations. Cory Wimberly uses archival materials and wide variety of sources — Foucault’s work on governmentality, political economy, liberalism, mass psychology, and history — to mount a genealogical challenge to two commonplaces about propaganda. First, modern propaganda did not originate in the state and was never primarily located (...)
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  41. Economic Rights as Human Rights: Commodification and Moral Parochialism.Daniel Attas - 2019 - In Economic Liberties and Human Rights.
    Human rights are a construct of international law. Their legitimacy depends on them being informed by the deep-seated fact of global cultural pluralism and the concern of establishing a system that recognizes this pluralism, transcends a narrow parochial perspective and thus avoids the accusation of cultural or moral colonialism. There are two broad strategies to do this: by invoking an individualist-moral conception of HR designed to promote well-being and by invoking a social-political conception of HR aimed at preserving world peace (...)
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  42. Whose Development? What Hegemony? Tackling the Structural Dynamics of Global Social Injustice.Albena Azmanova - 2019 - Ethics and Global Politics 12 (4):32-39.
  43. The Moral Limits of the Market: The Case of Consumer Scoring Data.Clinton Castro & Adam Pham - 2019 - Ethics and Information Technology 21 (2):117-126.
    We offer an ethical assessment of the market for data used to generate what are sometimes called “consumer scores” (i.e., numerical expressions that are used to describe or predict people’s dispositions and behavior), and we argue that the assessment has ethical implications on how the market for consumer scoring data should be regulated. To conduct the assessment, we employ two heuristics for evaluating markets. One is the “harm” criterion, which relates to whether the market produces serious harms, either for participants (...)
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  44. Four Models of Protecting Citizenship and Social Rights in Europe: Conclusions to the Special Issue ‘Rethinking the European Social Market Economy.Rutger Claassen, Anna Gerbrandy, Sebastiaan Princen & Mathieu Segers - 2019 - Journal of Common Market Studies 57 (1):159-174.
    This article offers a synthesis of and conclusion to the contributions included in the Special Issue 'Rethinking the European Social Market Economy'. Based on different understandings of citizenship in the European Union and the roles of the EU and its member states in providing social protection arrangements, it develops a typology of four models of the EU's role in social protection. It then discusses the contributions to this Special Issue in light of this typology and draws a number of overarching (...)
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  45. Rethinking the European Social Market Economy: Introduction to the Special Issue.Rutger Claassen, Anna Gerbrandy, Sebastiaan Princen & Mathieu Segers - 2019 - Journal of Common Market Studies 57 (1):3-12.
    This contribution offers an introduction to the Special Issue 'Rethinking the European Social Market Economy'. It places the Special Issue against the background of the debate on free markets versus social protection in the European Union and the inclusion of the notion of 'social market economy' in the Treaty on European Union. It sketches the meaning and development of the social market economy concept, and introduces the key questions underlying this Special Issue and the contributions included in it.
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  46. Labour Commodification and Global Justice.Fausto Corvino - 2019 - Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):53-88.
    In this article, I maintain that the social process of labour commodification, through which the individual capability to uphold a decent welfare is bound to participation in the labour market, poses a problem of justice from the republican prospective on freedom as non-domination. I first discuss the reasons we might hold that capitalism brings a form of systemic domination by virtue of one of its intrinsic features: unequal access to the means of production. Then, I argue for a minimum de-commodification (...)
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  47. Republican Freedom in the Labour Market: Exploitation Without Interpersonal Domination.Fausto Corvino - 2019 - Theoria 66 (158):103-131.
    In this article, I query whether participation in the labour market can hinder neo-republican freedom as non-domination. I briefly present the view of Philip Pettit on the topic, based on the distinction between offering a reward and threatening a punishment. I compare it to the analysis of labour republicans, recently reconstructed by Alex Gourevitch, according to whom, the exclusion of a group of individuals from the control of productive assets represents a form of structural domination. Then, I explain why I (...)
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  48. From Homo-Economicus to Homo-Virtus: A System-Theoretic Model for Raising Moral Self-Awareness.Julian Friedland & Benjamin M. Cole - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):191-205.
    There is growing concern that a global economic system fueled predominately by financial incentives may not maximize human flourishing and social welfare externalities. If so, this presents a challenge of how to get economic actors to adopt a more virtuous motivational mindset. Relying on historical, psychological, and philosophical research, we show how such a mindset can be instilled. First, we demonstrate that historically, financial self-interest has never in fact been the only guiding motive behind free markets, but that markets themselves (...)
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  49. Asylum for Sale: A Market Between States That is Feasible and Desirable.Johannes Himmelreich - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (2):217-232.
    The asylum system faces problems on two fronts. States undermine it with populist politics, and migrants use it to satisfy their migration preferences. To address these problems, asylum services should be commodified. States should be able to pay other states to provide determination and protection-elsewhere. In this article, I aim to identify a way of implementing this idea that is both feasible and desirable. First, I sketch a policy proposal for a commodification of asylum services. Then, I argue that this (...)
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  50. Markets, Interpersonal Practices, and Signal Distortion.Barry Maguire & Brookes Brown - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    Semiotic objections to market exchange of a good or service maintain that such exchanges signal an inappropriate attitude to the good or to associated individuals, and that this provides a weighty reason against having or participating in such markets. This style of argument has recently come under withering attack from Jason Brennan and Peter Jaworski (2015a, 2015b). They point out that the significance of any market exchange is explained by a contingent semiotic norm. Given the tremendous value that could be (...)
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