This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

9 found
Order:
  1. Love as a Habit: A Response to Vincent Lloyd.William T. Cavanaugh - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (1):121-123.
  2. What Love Is Not: Lessons From Martin Luther King, Jr.Vincent Lloyd - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (1):107-120.
  3. Love, Anger, and Racial Injustice.Myisha Cherry - 2019 - In Adrienne Martin (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Love in Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Luminaries like Martin Luther King, Jr. urge that Black Americans love even those who hate them. This can look like a rejection of anger at racial injustice. We see this rejection, too, in the growing trend of characterizing social justice movements as radical hate groups, and people who get angry at injustice as bitter and unloving. Philosophers like Martha Nussbaum argue that anger is backward-looking, status focused, and retributive. Citing the life of the Prodigal Son, the victims of the Charleston (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. Martin Luther, Die Juden Und Esther.Isaac Kalimi - 2019 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 71 (4):357-394.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Revolution of Conscience: MLK, Jr. And the Philosophy of Nonviolence (Kindle E-Book Edition).Greg Moses - 2018 - Austin, TX: Kindle.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. developed a philosophical logic of nonviolence in terms of equality, structure, nonviolent direct action, and love. Here we look at the way King's analysis makes use of each concept with a special view to the context of other Black activist intellectuals. This ebook is a slightly edited version of earlier print editions.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Democratic Impatience: Martin Luther King, Jr. On Democratic Temporality.Mario Feit - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (3):363-386.
    The intensifying speed-up of contemporary economic, social and political life troubles democratic theorists because they assume that democracy depends on patience. This article turns to Martin Luther King, Jr. to challenge democratic theory’s temporal bias. I argue that King demonstrates that impatience, too, is a democratic virtue. Building on impatient knowledge, democratic impatience aides in overcoming undemocratic legacies, fosters democratic subjectivity and agency, ensures political accountability, and creates a more inclusive practice of democratic belonging. I furthermore show that King reveals (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Toward a New Conception of Socially-Just Peace.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - In Fuat Gursozlu (ed.), Peace, Culture, and Violence. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 248-272.
    In this chapter, I approach the subject of peace by way of Andrew Fiala’s pioneering, synthetic work on “practical pacifism.” One of Fiala’s articles on the subject of peace is entitled “Radical Forgiveness and Human Justice”—and if one were to replace “Radical Forgiveness” with “Peace,” this would be a fair title for my chapter. In fact, Fiala himself explicitly makes a connection in the article between radical forgiveness and peace. Also in support of my project, Fiala’s article names four of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Roycean Roots of the Beloved Community.Gary Herstein - 2009 - The Pluralist 4 (2):91 - 107.
    While it is widely acknowledged that Martin Luther King’s notion of the “Beloved Community” owes the origin of its name to Josiah Royce, what has not been noticed in the literature on the subject is the depth of the connection between King’s and Royce’s conception of such a community. It is known that King studied Royce as a graduate student at Boston University, and that his advisors -- both Edgar Sheffield Brightman and L. Harrold DeWolf -- were intimately familiar with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Nonviolenza.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1996 - In Enciclopedia della Filosofia e delle Scienze Umane.
    A short reconstruction of the birth and development of the doctrine of non-violence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark