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  1. The Passions and Self-Esteem in Mary Astell's Early Feminist Prose.Kathleen Ann Ahearn - unknown
    This dissertation examines the influence of Cambridge Platonism and materialist philosophy on Mary Astell's early feminism. More specifically, I argue that Astell co-opts Descartes's theory of regulating the passions in his final publication, The Passions of the Soul, to articulate a comprehensive, Enlightenment and body friendly theory of feminine self-esteem that renders her feminism modern. My analysis of Astell's theory of feminine self-esteem follows both textual and contextual cues, thus allowing for a reorientation of her early feminism vis-a-vis contemporary feminist (...)
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  2. Reason and Religious Tolerance: Mary Astell’s Critique of Shaftesbury.D. P. Alvarez - 2011 - Eighteenth Century Studies 44 (4).
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  3. A Serious Proposal to the Ladies.Mary Astell - 2002 - Broadview Press.
    Mary Astell's A Serious Proposal to the Ladies is one of the most important and neglected works advocating the establishment of women's academies. Its reception was so controversial that Astell responded with a lengthy sequel, also in this volume. The cause of great notoriety, Astell's Proposal was imitated by Defoe in his "An Academy for Women," parodied in the Tatler, satirized on the stage, plagiarized by Bishop Berkeley, and later mocked by Gilbert and Sullivan in Princess Ida.
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  4. The First English Feminist Reflections Upon Marriage and Other Writings.Mary Astell & Bridget Hill - 1986
  5. A Serious Proposal to the Ladies. Parts I & II.Mary Astell & Patricia Springborg - 1998 - Utopian Studies 9 (2):225-226.
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  6. The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Volume 1: From Plato to Nietzsche.Andrew R. Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) - 2008 - Broadview Press.
    This comprehensive volume contains much of the important work in political and social philosophy from ancient times until the end of the nineteenth century. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thucydides, Seneca, and Cicero are included along with Plato and Aristotle; Al-Farabi, Marsilius of Padua, and de Pizan take their place alongside Augustine and Aquinas; Astell and Constant are presented in the company of (...)
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  7. Amor Dei in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.David C. Bellusci (ed.) - 2013 - Editions Rodopi.
    Amor Dei, “love of God” raises three questions: How do we know God is love? How do we experience love of God? How free are we to love God? This book presents three kinds of love, worldly, spiritual, and divine to understand God’s love. The work begins with Augustine’s Confessions highlighting his Manichean and Neoplatonic periods before his conversion to Christianity. Augustine’s confrontation with Pelagius anticipates the unresolved disputes concerning God’s love and free will. In the sixteenth-century the Italian humanist, (...)
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  8. The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue. [REVIEW]Sandrine Berges - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):835-837.
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  9. On the Outskirts of the Canon: The Myth of the Lone Female Philosopher, and What to Do About It.Sandrine Berges - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):380-397.
    Women philosophers of the past, because they tended not to engage with each other much, are often perceived as isolated from ongoing philosophical dialogues. This has led—directly and indirectly—to their exclusion from courses in the history of philosophy. This article explores three ways in which we could solve this problem. The first is to create a course in early modern philosophy that focuses solely or mostly on female philosophers, using conceptual and thematic ties such as a concern for education and (...)
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  10. Koncasinda Koparilmiş Akil: Kadin Haklarinin Gerekçelendirilmesinde Özgürlük Ve Eğitim.Sandrine Berges - 2011 - Felsefe Tartismalari 46:18-38.
    This paper focuses on what Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft had to say about women's condition of subservience in the 18th century. While both philosophers held that education played a central role in women's freedom, there were some significant differences in their outlooks. I will try to understand Astell's arguments in the light of Wollstonecraft's subtle and perceptive analysis of oppression. I will further suggest that Wollstonecraft's own account is closely related to Amartya Sen's discussion of adaptive preferences and indeed (...)
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  11. Mary Astell on Flattery and Self-Esteem.A. Blank - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):53-63.
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  12. The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue, by Jacqueline Broad. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):606-609.
  13. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination - by Patricia Springborg.Deborah Boyle - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (4):359-360.
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  14. Astell, Mary.Jacqueline Broad - 2017 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Mary Astell The English writer Mary Astell is widely known today as an early feminist pioneer, but not so well known as a philosophical thinker. Her feminist reputation rests largely on her impassioned plea to establish an all-female college in England, an idea first put forward in her Serious Proposal to the Ladies. … Continue reading Astell, Mary →.
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  15. Snapshot: Mary Astell.Jacqueline Broad - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 74:63-65.
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  16. The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue.Jacqueline Broad - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Mary Astell is best known today as one of the earliest English feminists. This book sheds new light on her writings by interpreting her first and foremost as a moral philosopher—as someone committed to providing guidance on how best to live. The central claim of this work is that all the different strands of Astell’s thought—her epistemology, her metaphysics, her philosophy of the passions, her feminist vision, and her conservative political views—are best understood in light of her ethical objectives. To (...)
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  17. Mary Astell on Marriage and Lockean Slavery.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - History of Political Thought 35 (4):717–38.
    In the 1706 third edition of her Reflections upon Marriage, Mary Astell alludes to John Locke’s definition of slavery in her descriptions of marriage. She describes the state of married women as being ‘subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, Arbitrary Will of another Man’ (Locke, Two Treatises, II.22). Recent scholars maintain that Astell does not seriously regard marriage as a form of slavery in the Lockean sense. In this paper, I defend the contrary position: I argue that Astell does seriously (...)
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  18. Women on Liberty in Early Modern England.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (2):112-122.
    Our modern ideals about liberty were forged in the great political and philosophical debates of the 17th and 18th centuries, but we seldom hear about women's contributions to those debates. This paper examines the ideas of early modern English women – namely Margaret Cavendish, Mary Astell, Mary Overton, ‘Eugenia’, Sarah Chapone and the civil war women petitioners – with respect to the classic political concepts of negative, positive and republican liberty. The author suggests that these writers' woman-centred concerns provide a (...)
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  19. Impressions in the Brain: Malebranche on Women, and Women on Malebranche.Jacqueline Broad - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):373-389.
    In his De la recherche de la vérité (The Search after Truth) of 1674-75, Nicolas Malebranche makes a number of apparently contradictory remarks about women and their capacity for pure intellectual thought. On the one hand, he seems to espouse a negative biological determinism about women’s minds, and on the other, he suggests that women have the free capacity to attain truth and happiness, regardless of their physiology. In the early eighteenth-century, four English women thinkers – Anne Docwra (c. 1624-1710), (...)
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  20. Mary Astell's Machiavellian Moment? Politics and Feminism in Moderation Truly Stated.Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - In Jo Wallwork & Paul Salzman (eds.), Early Modern Englishwomen Testing Ideas. Ashgate. pp. 9-23.
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  21. Mary Astell on Virtuous Friendship.Jacqueline Broad - 2009 - Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies 26 (2):65-86.
    According to some scholars, Mary Astell’s feminist programme is severely limited by its focus on self-improvement rather than wider social change. In response, I highlight the role of ‘virtuous friendship’ in Astell’s 1694 work, A Serious Proposal to the Ladies. Building on classical ideals and traditional Christian principles, Astell promotes the morally transformative power of virtuous friendship among women. By examining the significance of such friendship to Astell’s feminism, we can see that she did in fact aim to bring about (...)
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  22. Astell, Cartesian Ethics, and the Critique of Custom.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - In William Kolbrener & Michal Michelson (eds.), Mary Astell: Reason, Gender, Faith. Ashgate. pp. 165-79.
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  23. Adversaries or Allies? Occasional Thoughts on the Masham-Astell Exchange.Jacqueline Broad - 2003 - Eighteenth-Century Thought 1:123-49.
    Against the backdrop of the English reception of Locke’s Essay, stands a little-known philosophical dispute between two seventeenth-century women writers: Mary Astell (1666-1731) and Damaris Cudworth Masham (1659-1708). On the basis of their brief but heated exchange, Astell and Masham are typically regarded as philosophical adversaries: Astell a disciple of the occasionalist John Norris, and Masham a devout Lockean. In this paper, I argue that although there are many respects in which Astell and Masham are radically opposed, the two women (...)
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  24. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century.Jacqueline Broad - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  25. The Celebrated Mary Astell: An Early English Feminist.Alice Browne - 1988 - History of European Ideas 9 (4):505-506.
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  26. Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”.Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  27. Remarkable Women in a Remarkable Age. Sulla genesi della sfera pubblica inglese, 1642-1752.Eleonora Cappuccilli - 2015 - Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 27 (52).
    During the era of the English Revolutions and shortly after that, some spaces, albeit limited, of female visibility open up. Thanks to the window of opportunity caused by the collapse of censorship, the participation in the radical sects and in the Civil war, some remarkable women succeed in introducing themselves in the public sphere, shaping it since its very genesis. Moreover, analysing law institutions as jointure and feoffment, the attempt is to reconstruct some fragments of juridical female autonomy, which belie (...)
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  28. Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Catherine Wilson & Stephen Gaukroger (eds.), Mind and Nature in Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
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  29. Women, Liberty, and Forms of Feminism.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen (eds.), Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter shows how Mary Astell and Margaret Cavendish can reasonably be understood as early feminists in three senses of the term. First, they are committed to the natural equality of men and women, and related, they are committed to equal opportunity of education for men and women. Second, they are committed to social structures that help women develop authentic selves and thus autonomy understood in one sense of the word. Third, they acknowledge the power of production relationships, especially friendships (...)
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  30. Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education.Karen Detlefsen - 2016 - In Penny Weiss & Alice Sowaal (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 74-92.
    Whatever may be said about contemporary feminists’ evaluation of Descartes’ role in the history of feminism, Mary Astell herself believed that Descartes’ philosophy held tremendous promise for women. His urging all people to eschew the tyranny of custom and authority in order to uncover the knowledge that could be found in each one of our unsexed souls potentially offered women a great deal of intellectual and personal freedom and power. Certainly Astell often read Descartes in this way, and Astell herself (...)
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  31. Critical Notice.Karen Detlefsen - 2004 - Philosophical Inquiry 26 (4):131-138.
    Critical notice of Jacqueline Broad's Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century (CUP, 2002).
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  32. Christianity and Women's Education: Anna Maria van Schurman and Mary Astell.Jane Duran - 2014 - Philosophy and Theology 26 (1):3-18.
    A contrast is developed between the educational views of van Schurman and Astell, revolving around their sense of Christian piety and their stance on women’s place in the social and political sphere. The work of Irwin, Hill, and others is cited, and it is concluded that important differences between the views of the two thinkers can be delineated, and that doing so helps us to understand the intellectual and philosophical milieu of the seventeenth century. In addition, the debate sheds light (...)
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  33. Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism.Jane Duran - 2006 - University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
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  34. Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist.Jane Duran - 2000 - In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press. pp. 147--154.
  35. The Love of God and the Radical Enlightenment: Mary Astell's Brush with Spinoza.Sarah Ellenzweig - 2003 - Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):379-397.
  36. Including Early Modern Women Writers in Survey Courses: A Call to Action.Jessica Gordon-Roth & Nancy Kendrick - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):364-379.
    There are many reasons to include texts written by women in early modern philosophy courses. The most obvious one is accuracy: women helped to shape the philosophical landscape of the time. Thus, to craft a syllabus that wholly excludes women is to give students an inaccurate picture of the early modern period. Since it seems safe to assume that we all aim for accuracy, this should be reason enough to include women writers in our courses. This article nonetheless offers an (...)
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  37. A Moral Philosophy of Their Own? The Moral and Political Thought of Eighteenth-Century British Women.Karen Green - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):89-101.
    Despite the fact that the High-Church Tory, Mary Astell, held political views diametrically opposed to the Whiggish Catharine Trotter Cockburn and Catharine Macaulay, it is here argued that their metaethical views were surprisingly similar. All were influenced by a blend of Christian universalism and Aristotelian eudaimonism, which accepted the existence of a law of nature, that we strive for happiness, and that happiness results from living in accord with our God-given nature. They differed with regard to epistemological issues; the means (...)
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  38. A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1700–1800.Karen Green - 2014 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    During the eighteenth century, elite women participated in the philosophical, scientific, and political controversies that resulted in the overthrow of monarchy, the reconceptualisation of marriage, and the emergence of modern, democratic institutions. In this comprehensive study, Karen Green outlines and discusses the ideas and arguments of these women, exploring the development of their distinctive and contrasting political positions, and their engagement with the works of political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville and Rousseau. Her exploration ranges across Europe from England (...)
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  39. When is a Contract Theorist Not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes.Karen Green - 2012 - In Nancy Hirschmann Joanne Wright (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. Penn State. pp. 169-89.
    Although Catharine Macaulay was a contract theorist and early feminist her philosophy is not based on a concept of liberty like that of Hobbes, but on a notion of individual liberty as self government close to that accepted by Mary Astell. This raises the question of whether criticisms of liberal feminism which assume that it is rooted in Hobbes's suspect notion of freedom and consent may miss there mark.
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  40. Learning Performances of Dislocation, Receptivity and Hybridity in Women's Utopian Writing.Zelia Gregoriou - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    This thesis explores utopias as itineraries of learning at gender, national, and language borders rather than as didactic stories that recite and legitimize the center's grand narratives of rationality and progress. It is both deconstructive and revisionary, critical and performative. A postmodern journey in utopia, this project offers a deconstruction of the cultural imperialism and Eurocentrism which are built-in the utopianism of political philosophy, theories of childhood and learning, and Western representations of others in colonial travel narratives. Intricately braided with (...)
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  41. John Locke and Eighteenth-Century Education for Women: The Didactic Novel as Lockean Education in the Fiction of Sarah Fielding and Charlotte Lennox.Kristen Leigh Hague - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of New Mexico
    The subject of my dissertation is the way that the novels of Sarah Fielding and Charlotte Lennox functioned as didactic texts for instructing girls and young women, texts informed in part by John Locke's and Mary Astell's theories of education. ;In particular, I focus on Locke's and Astell's theories as they relate to these novels in order to illustrate the manner in which Fielding and Lennox use reading---of both texts and people---as a tool for modeling theories of education, specifically as (...)
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  42. Philosophy and Sexual Politics in Mary Astell and Samuel Richardson.Jocelyn Harris - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):445-463.
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  43. Mary Astell: Political Writings; Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Women.S. Hutton - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:176-177.
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  44. The Philosophy of Mary Astell by Jacqueline Broad.Sarah Hutton - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):504-505.
    The study of female philosophers of the past has come a long way in the last two decades. Until relatively recently, special pleading was required in order to make the case that there were any women philosophers and that they deserved to be taken seriously. Since then the picture has changed radically. Not only are the philosophical credentials of women philosophers better known, but many more women have been recognized as philosophers. It is increasingly taken for granted that philosophers today (...)
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  45. The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England by Mary Astell.Sarah Hutton - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):847-848.
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  46. Mary Astell's 'Excited Needles': Theorizing Feminist Utopia in Seventeenth-Century England.Alessa Johns - 1996 - Utopian Studies 7 (1):60 - 74.
  47. Mary Astell’s Theory of Spiritual Friendship.Nancy Kendrick - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):46-65.
    Mary Astell’s theory of friendship has been interpreted either as a version of Aristotelian virtue friendship, or as aligned with a Christian and Platonist tradition. In this paper, I argue that Astell’s theory of friendship is determinedly anti-Aristotelian; it is a theory of spiritual friendship offered as an alternative to Aristotelian virtue friendship. By grounding her conception of friendship in a Christian–Platonist metaphysics, I show that Astell rejects the Aristotelian criteria of reciprocity and partiality as essential features of the friendship (...)
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  48. Mary Astell: Reason, Gender, Faith.William Kolbrener & Michal Michelson (eds.) - 2007 - Ashgate.
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  49. Mary Astell on the Existence and Nature of God.Marcy Lascano - 2016 - In Alice Sowaal & Penny Weiss (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 168-187.
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  50. Marriage and Misogyny: The Place of Mary Astell in the History of Political Thought.A. Lister - 2004 - History of Political Thought 25 (1):44-72.
    This article qualifies and supplements the interpretation of Astell's Reflections on Marriage as an attack on contract theories of politics. Astell was undoubtedly a conservative critic of Locke, but also deserves her reputation as a feminist critic of marriage, since the primary purpose of her Reflections was to get women to reflect on whether to marry, and seriously to consider not marrying. The essay supports this interpretation by locating Astell's Reflections in the context of the querelle des femmes. Viewed as (...)
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