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  1. added 2020-05-26
    Neurostimulation, doping, and the spirit of sport.Jonathan Pugh & Christopher Pugh - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-18.
    There is increasing interest in using neuro-stimulation devices to achieve an ergogenic effect in elite athletes. Although the World Anti-Doping Authority does not currently prohibit neuro-stimulation techniques, a number of researchers have called on WADA to consider its position on this issue. Focusing on trans-cranial direct current stimulation as a case study of an imminent so-called ‘neuro-doping’ intervention, we argue that the emerging evidence suggests that tDCS may meet WADA’s own criteria for a method’s inclusion on its list of prohibited (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-21
    Continuous Glucose Monitoring as a Matter of Justice.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-26.
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic illness that requires intensive lifelong management of blood glucose concentrations by means of external insulin administration. There have been substantial developments in the ways of measuring glucose levels, which is crucial to T1D self-management. Recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has allowed people with T1D to keep track of their blood glucose levels in near real-time. These devices have alarms that warn users about potentially dangerous blood glucose trends, which can often be shared with (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-12
    No Blame No Gain? From a No Blame Culture to a Responsibility Culture in Medicine.Joshua Parker & Ben Davies - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
  4. added 2020-04-29
    The Legislation of Things.Ilana Löwy - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (3):533-543.
  5. added 2020-04-28
    The Doctor's Dilemma: Problems That Do Not Go Away.W. M. Landau - 1989 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (4):505.
  6. added 2020-04-27
    How Should Physicians Manage Neuroprognosis with ECPR?Ian McCurry, Jason Han & Andrew Courtwright - forthcoming - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics.
    Rapidly advancing technologies in the field of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) have presented a new challenge in accurate neuroprognostication following cardiac arrest. Determination of brain state informs the prognostic picture and allows providers to begin effective communication regarding likelihood of meaningful neurological recovery as defined by patients or family members. The evolving role of sedation during ECPR and its impacts on ethical tension in decision-making is reviewed. Work surrounding the advancing field of neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest and hypothermia is summarized (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-27
    Canadian Medical System.J. M. Orient - 1988 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (4):614.
  8. added 2020-04-27
    The Oath: An Investigation of the Injunction Prohibiting Physician-Patient Sexual Relations.M. L. Campbell - 1988 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (2):300-308.
  9. added 2020-04-27
    Resolving Problems at the Intensive Care Unit/Oncology Unit Interface.S. J. Youngner, M. Allen, H. Montenegro, J. Hreha & H. Lazarus - 1988 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (2):299.
  10. added 2020-04-27
    Refusing Medical Treatment.L. M. Peterson - 1988 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (3):454.
  11. added 2020-04-26
    The Philosophy of Medicine: Clinical Science and its Ethics.D. A. Moros - 1987 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (1):134.
    Of central concern to the philosophy of medicine is an understanding of the relationship that arises between science and ethics when decisions involve human beings. To examine this relationship, we must consider the status of claims to medical knowledge and whether there exists within medical practice a style of collecting and analyzing data and mak- ing therapeutic decisions that is properly called science. Since ideally, in medicine, knowledge guides practice, to a significant extent our factual claims will legislate our behavior (...)
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  12. added 2020-04-16
    Clarifying the Best Interests Standard: The Elaborative and Enumerative Strategies in Public Policy-Making.Chong Ming Lim, Michael C. Dunn & Jacqueline J. Chin - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):542-549.
    One recurring criticism of the best interests standard concerns its vagueness, and thus the inadequate guidance it offers to care providers. The lack of an agreed definition of ‘best interests’, together with the fact that several suggested considerations adopted in legislation or professional guidelines for doctors do not obviously apply across different groups of persons, result in decisions being made in murky waters. In response, bioethicists have attempted to specify the best interests standard, to reduce the indeterminacy surrounding medical decisions. (...)
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  13. added 2020-04-03
    Allocation of Scarce Biospecimens for Use in Research.Leah Pierson, Sophia Gibert, Benjamin Berkman, Marion Danis & Joseph Millum - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105766.
    Hundreds of millions of rare biospecimens are stored in laboratories and biobanks around the world. Often, the researchers who possess these specimens do not plan to use them, while other researchers limit the scope of their work because they cannot acquire biospecimens that meet their needs. This situation raises an important and underexplored question: how should scientists allocate biospecimens that they do not intend to use? We argue that allocators should aim to maximise the social value of the research enterprise (...)
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  14. added 2020-04-01
    Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
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  15. added 2020-04-01
    The Internal Morality of Medicine: A Constructivist Approach.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4449-4467.
    Physicians frequently ask whether they should give patients what they want, usually when there are considerations pointing against doing so, such as medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations. It has been argued that the source of medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations lies in what has been dubbed “the internal morality of medicine”: medicine is a practice with an end and norms that are definitive of this practice and that determine what physicians ought to do qua physicians. In this paper, I defend (...)
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  16. added 2020-04-01
    The Truth Behind Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):404-410.
    Answers to the questions of what justifies conscientious objection in medicine in general and which specific objections should be respected have proven to be elusive. In this paper, I develop a new framework for conscientious objection in medicine that is based on the idea that conscience can express true moral claims. I draw on one of the historical roots, found in Adam Smith’s impartial spectator account, of the idea that an agent’s conscience can determine the correct moral norms, even if (...)
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  17. added 2020-03-27
    Transhumanism, in vitro fertilization and woman dignity.Carlos Alberto Rosas Jimenez - 2020 - In Diana Stephania Muñoz-Gomez (ed.), La persona: on-off Desafíos de la familia en la cuarta revolución industrial. Bogotá, Colombia: pp. 304-317.
    Transhumanism is a movement that seeks to transcend certain limits inherent in the human condition as we know it. However, does it justify leaving aside the dignity of current human beings to fulfill the desire to increase human potential and improve the human being as such to obtain other human beings? Does it justify passing over the dignity of women in order to obtain new human beings through fertilization? To answer these questions we have made a sweep over the ideas (...)
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  18. added 2020-03-26
    Targeting the Fetal Body and/or Mother-Child Connection: Vital Conflicts and Abortion.Helen Watt & Anthony McCarthy - 2019 - The Linacre Quarterly:1-14.
    Is the “act itself” of separating a pregnant woman and her previable child neither good nor bad morally, considered in the abstract? Recently, Maureen Condic and Donna Harrison have argued that such separation is justified to protect the mother’s life and that it does not constitute an abortion as the aim is not to kill the child. In our article on maternal–fetal conflicts, we agree there need be no such aim to kill (supplementing aims such as to remove). However, we (...)
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  19. added 2020-03-20
    Vaccinating for Whom? Distinguishing Between Self-Protective, Paternalistic, Altruistic and Indirect Vaccination.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phaa005.
    Preventive vaccination can protect not just vaccinated individuals, but also others, which is often a central point in discussions about vaccination. To date, there has been no systematic study of self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination. This article has two major goals: first, to examine and distinguish between self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination, especially with regard to vaccinating for the sake of third parties, and second, to explore some ways in which this approach can help to clarify and guide (...)
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  20. added 2020-02-17
    Two Methods of Doing Bioethics.Dieter Birnbacher - 1994 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 2:173-185.
    The subject matter of ethics is morality, and ethics deals with it in four different though closely related ways: by analysis, by criticism, by norm construction, and by moral pragmatics.
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  21. added 2020-02-09
    Increased Performance and Better Patient Attendance in an Hospital with the Use of Smart Agendas.Ângelo Costa, Paulo Novais, Juan M. Corchado & José Neves - 2012 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 20 (4):689-698.
    Hospital environments tend to be very ineffective, resulting in the lost of valuable resources at all times. Current approaches that address this problem tend to ignore the patient, looking only at the economics. In our view, these systems must be patient centred, and for that reason, we look at the development of tools that can improve the use of timely resources in such environments. The solution presented in this work consists in the use of personal memory assistants to monitor single (...)
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  22. added 2020-02-09
    Review: An Introductory Philosophy of Medicine: Humanizing Modern Medicine. [REVIEW]Igor Eterović - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (1):244-246.
    The review of James Marcum's book starts with the explanation of the introductory character of the book in the field of philosophy of medicine. Than, the quality-of-care crisis is presented as the central motivation of the book. The clash between prevalent biomedical model in medicine and desirable humanistic model is explored through the presentation of all three parts of the book. The first part deals with metaphysical boundaries of biomedical and humanistic models. The second part is concerned with the epistemology (...)
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  23. added 2020-02-09
    CULVER, C. M. And GERT, B. "Philosophy in Medicine: Conceptual and Ethical Issues in Medicine and Psychiatry". [REVIEW]R. Lindley - 1984 - Mind 93:624.
  24. added 2020-02-07
    Medical Ontology.Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh - 2nd ed. 2015 - In Handbook of Analytic Philosophy of Medicine. Springer Verlag.
    Due to the intricate nature of its subject matter, medicine is always threatened by speculations and disagreements about which among its entities exist, e.g., any specific biological structures, substructures or substances, pathogenic agents, pathophysiological processes, diseases, psychosomatic relationships, therapeutic effects, and other possible and impossible things. To avoid confusion, and to determine what entities an item of medical knowledge presupposes to exist if it is to be true, we need medical ontology. The term “medical ontology” we understand to mean the (...)
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  25. added 2020-02-07
    Targeted Chemotherapy, the Medical Ecosystem, and the Future of American Health Care.Muriel R. Gillick - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (2):268-284.
    In light of the central role that medications play in medical progress, the declining rate of new drug development over the past decade is cause for concern . Without important breakthroughs in drug discovery, the future will not be auspicious for the many people suffering from chronic and incurable illnesses. The sluggish pace of pharmaceutical innovation has been particularly characteristic of the largest drug manufacturers, which have generally focused their energies on potential blockbuster medications, those that can generate over $1 (...)
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  26. added 2020-02-07
    Psychiatric-Legal Decision Making by the Mental Health Practitioner the Clinician as de Facto Magistrate.Harvey Bluestone, Sheldon Travin & Douglas B. Marlowe - 1994
  27. added 2020-02-06
    Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof.Julian Koplin & Michael Selgelid - 2019 - Journal of Practical Ethics 7 (3):32-53.
    Janet Radcliffe Richards’ The Ethics of Transplants outlines a novel framework for moral inquiry in practical contexts and applies it to the topic of paid living kidney donation. In doing so, Radcliffe Richards makes two key claims: that opponents of organ markets bear the burden of proof, and that this burden has not yet been satisfied. This paper raises four related objections to Radcliffe Richards’ methodological framework, focusing largely on how Radcliffe Richards uses this framework in her discussion of kidney (...)
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  28. added 2020-02-06
    Not a Defence of Organ Markets.Janet Radcliffe Richards - 2019 - Journal of Practical Ethics 7 (3):54-66.
    Selgelid and Koplin’s article ‘Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof’ (K&S 2019) presents a series of detailed and persuasive arguments, intended to demolish my own arguments against the prohibition of organ selling. And perhaps they might succeed, if the case described by the authors were anything like the one I actually make. However, notwithstanding the extensive quotations and the detailed explanations of the way I supposedly argue, this account of my position comprehensively mistakes both the conclusions I reach and (...)
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  29. added 2020-02-06
    Peabody’s “Care of the Patient” and the Nature of Medical Science.Howard Brody - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (3):341-350.
    Francis W. Peabody’s 1927 essay “The Care of the Patient” may be one of the most widely quoted and yet least read “classics” in medicine. Its famous concluding line, “The secret of the care of the patient is in caring for the patient,” shorn of context, risks degeneration into platitude. Yet how many readers today follow the entire thread of argument to see how Peabody arrived at his conclusion?Understanding “The Care of the Patient” in context requires at least three things. (...)
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  30. added 2020-02-05
    Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics By Elliott N. Dorff.Audrey Gordon - 1999 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (1):147-148.
  31. added 2020-02-05
    Hidden Superstitions as a Barrier Between Doctor and Patient in an Island Culture.Ian Shine - 1969 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 13 (1):63-70.
  32. added 2020-02-05
    Scientific Medicine and Historical Research.Owsei Temkin - 1959 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 3 (1):70-85.
  33. added 2020-02-04
    A Proposal for New Careers in Health Care.James S. Terry - 1984 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 28 (1):35-39.
  34. added 2020-01-29
    The Doctor, the Patient, and the System: Reflections on Education for Clinical Careers.Jeremiah A. Barondess - 1983 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 26 (2):261-273.
  35. added 2020-01-29
    Some Ethical Issues in Research Involving Human Subjects.LeRoy Walters, Carlos A. Schaffenburg & Samuel Stearns - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (2):193-214.
  36. added 2020-01-29
    The Ethics of Biomedical Interventions.Dwight J. Ingle - 1970 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 13 (3):364-387.
  37. added 2020-01-20
    When Death Is Sought: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in the Medical Context.Christine K. Cassel - 1995 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 38 (3):511-512.
  38. added 2020-01-20
    Reflections From the Clinic.Irwin M. Siegel - 1981 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 24 (3):395-395.
  39. added 2020-01-19
    A Social Organizational Approach to Problems of Ethics in Clinical Research.David R. Maines & Attallah Kappas - 1978 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (4):606-616.
  40. added 2020-01-19
    Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution by Robert M. Veatch.Robert J. Comiskey - 1978 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (4):635-637.
  41. added 2020-01-19
    Concepts of Disease: Logical Features and Social Implications.Horacio Fabrega - 1972 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 15 (4):583-616.
  42. added 2020-01-14
    Justice and Genes. [REVIEW]Adam Hayden - 2019 - Science 366 (6461):42.
  43. added 2020-01-12
    The Evaluation of Complex Clinical Trial Protocols: Resources Available to Research Ethics Committees and the Use of Clinical Trial Registries—a Case Study.Núria Homedes & Antonio Ugalde - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (6):464-469.
  44. added 2020-01-12
    AIDS and Contemporary History Edited by Virginia Berridge and Philip Strong.Joel D. Howell - 1994 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (4):617-618.
  45. added 2020-01-12
    Toward an Adequate Pool of Clinical Investigators.John F. Sherman - 1980 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 23 (2-2):S79-S82.
  46. added 2020-01-11
    Ethical and Moral Concerns Regarding Artificial Intelligence in Law and Medicine.Soaad Hossain - 2018 - Journal of Undergraduate Life Sciences 12 (1):10.
    This paper summarizes the seminar AI in Medicine in Context: Hopes? Nightmares? that was held at the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto on October 17, 2017, with special guest assistant professor and neurosurgeon Dr. Sunit Das. The paper discusses the key points from Dr. Das' talk. Specifically, it discusses about Dr. Das' perspective on the ethical and moral issues that was experienced from applying artificial intelligence (AI) in law and how such issues can also arise when applying (...)
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  47. added 2020-01-11
    On the Metaphysics of Diseases.Benjamin Smart - unknown
    Identifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for individuating and classifying diseases is a matter of great importance in the fields of law, ethics, epidemiology, and of course medicine. In this paper I first propose a means of achieving this goal, ensuring that no two distinct disease-types could correctly be ascribed to the same disease-token. I then posit a metaphysical ontology of diseases - that is, I give an account of what a disease is. This is essential to providing the most (...)
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  48. added 2020-01-11
    Expected Net Benefit of Clinical Pharmacy in Intensive Care Medicine: A Randomized Interventional Comparative Trial with Matched Before-and-After Groups.Barbara O. M. Claus, Hugo Robays, Johan Decruyenaere & Lieven Annemans - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):1172-1179.
  49. added 2020-01-11
    Implementation of Evidence-Based Falls Prevention in Clinical Services for High-Risk Clients.Lesley Day, Margaret J. Trotter, Keith D. Hill, Terry P. Haines & Catherine Thompson - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (3):255-259.
    The extent to which best practice for falls prevention is being routinely delivered by health care providers for community‐dwelling older adults is unclear. We investigated falls prevention practice among Hospital Admission Risk Programs (HARP) that provide and coordinate specialized health care for people at high risk of hospitalization.
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  50. added 2020-01-11
    Why Patients Have a Moral Obligation to Give Care to Clinicians.Stephen Buetow - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):890-895.
    Progress is being made in transitioning from clinicians who are torn between caring for patients and populations, to clinicians who are partnering with patients to care for patients as people. However, the focus is still on what patients and others can do for patients, however defined. For clinicians whose interests must be similarly respected for their own sake and because they are integrally related to those of patients, what can and should patients do? Patients can be exempted from some normal (...)
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