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  1. Clinical Ethics Protocols in the Clinical Ethics Committees of Madrid.M. A. Sanchez-Gonzalez, B. Herreros, V. R. Ramnath, M. D. Martin, E. Pintor & L. Bishop - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):205-208.
    Introduction Currently, The nature and scope of Clinical Ethics Protocols in Madrid are not well understood.Objectives The main objective is to describe the features of ‘guideline/recommendation’ type CEPs that have been or are being developed by existing Clinical Ethics Committees in Madrid. Secondary objectives include characterisation of those CECs that have been the most prolific in reference to CEP creation and implementation and identification of any trends in future CEP development.Methods We collected CEPs produced and in process by CECs accredited (...)
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  2. The Limits of Individuality: Ritual and Sacrifice in the Lives and Medical Treatment of Conjoined Twins.D. A. - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):1-29.
  3. Chemical Castration of Danish Sex Offenders.Lise Aagaard - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):117-118.
    Surgical castration of sex offenders has been used in several countries to prevent sexual recidivism and is still practiced in several states in the United States. In Europe, it has remained in limited use in Germany and in the Czech Republic (Douglas et al. 2013). Since the 1960s, most jurisdictions have replaced irreversible surgical castration of sex offenders with reversible chemical castration with anti-androgen drugs. In Denmark, use of surgical castration was stopped in 1970, and since the late 1980s, serious (...)
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  4. "If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians.M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including three women), (...)
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  5. “If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician”: A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians.M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues.Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians , aged 33–66 years, (...)
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  6. Rare but Routine: The Physician's Obligation to Protect Third Parties.Elmer D. Abbo & Angelo E. Volandes - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):34 – 36.
  7. Seven Things to Know About Female Genital Surgeries in Africa.Jasmine Abdulcadir, Fuambai Sia Ahmadu, Lucrezia Catania, Birgitta Essen, Ellen Gruenbaum, Sara Johnsdotter, Michelle C. Johnson, Crista Johnson-Agbakwu, Corinne Kratz, Carlos Londoño Sulkin, Michelle McKinley, Wairimu Njambi, Juliet Rogers, Bettina Shell-Duncan & Richard A. Shweder - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (6):19-27.
    Western media coverage of female genital modifications in Africa has been hyperbolic and one-sided, presenting them uniformly as mutilation and ignoring the cultural complexities that underlie these practices. Even if we ultimately decide that female genital modifications should be abandoned, the debate around them should be grounded in a better account of the facts.
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  8. Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries.H. E. Abdulhameed, M. M. Hammami & E. A. Hameed Mohamed - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
    Background The consistency of codes governing disclosure of terminal illness to patients and families in Islamic countries has not been studied until now. Objectives To review available codes on disclosure of terminal illness in Islamic countries. Data source and extraction Data were extracted through searches on Google and PubMed. Codes related to disclosure of terminal illness to patients or families were abstracted, and then classified independently by the three authors. Data synthesis Codes for 14 Islamic countries were located. Five codes (...)
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  9. Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries.Hunida E. Abdulhameed, Muhammad M. Hammami & Elbushra A. Hameed Mohamed - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
  10. Lifting the Veil: A Typological Survey of the Methodological Features of Islamic Ethical Reasoning on Biomedical Issues.Khalil Abdur-Rashid, Steven Woodward Furber & Taha Abdul-Basser - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):81-93.
    We survey the meta-ethical tools and institutional processes that traditional Islamic ethicists apply when deliberating on bioethical issues. We present a typology of these methodological elements, giving particular attention to the meta-ethical techniques and devices that traditional Islamic ethicists employ in the absence of decisive or univocal authoritative texts or in the absence of established transmitted cases. In describing how traditional Islamic ethicists work, we demonstrate that these experts possess a variety of discursive tools. We find that the ethical responsa—i.e., (...)
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  11. What is Dignity in Prehospital Emergency Care?A. Abelsson & L. Lindwall - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (3):268-278.
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  12. Struggling with the Fragility of Life: A Relational-Narrative Approach to Ethics in Palliative Nursing.Tineke A. Abma - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):337-348.
    In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband’s narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. (...)
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  13. Evaluating Palliative Care: Facilitating Reflexive Dialgoues About an Ambiguous Concept. [REVIEW]Tineke A. Abma - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):261-276.
    Palliation is a relatively new concept that is used in connection with the integral care provided to those who are unable to recover from their illness. The specific meaning of the concept has not been clearly defined. This article explores the possibilities offered by a responsive approach to evaluation that can facilitate a reflexive dialogue on this ambiguous concept. In doing so it draws on a case study of a palliative care project in a Dutch health care authority. The article (...)
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  14. Inter-Ethics: Towards an Interactive and Interdependent Bioethics.Tineke A. Abma, Vivianne E. Baur, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):242-255.
    Since its origin bioethics has been a specialized, academic discipline, focussing on moral issues, using a vast set of globalized principles and rational techniques to evaluate and guide healthcare practices. With the emergence of a plural society, the loss of faith in experts and authorities and the decline of overarching grand narratives and shared moralities, a new approach to bioethics is needed. This approach implies a shift from an external critique of practices towards embedded ethics and interactive practice improvement, and (...)
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  15. Moral Deliberation in Psychiatric Nursing Practice.Tineke A. Abma & Guy Am Widdershoven - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (5):546-557.
    Moral deliberation has been receiving more attention in nursing ethics. Several ethical conversation models have been developed. This article explores the feasibility of the so-called CARE (Considerations, Actions, Reasons, Experiences) model as a framework for moral deliberation in psychiatric nursing practice. This model was used in combination with narrative and dialogical approaches to foster discourse between various stakeholders about coercion in a closed admission clinic in a mental hospital in the Netherlands. The findings demonstrate that the CARE model provides a (...)
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  16. Collection, Storage and Use of Blood Samples for Future Research: Views of Egyptian Patients Expressed in a Cross-Sectional Survey.A. Abou-Zeid, H. Silverman, M. Shehata, M. Shams, M. Elshabrawy, T. Hifnawy, S. A. Rahman, B. Galal, H. Sleem, N. Mikhail & N. Moharram - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):539-547.
    Objective To determine the attitudes of Egyptian patients regarding their participation in research and with the collection, storage and future use of blood samples for research purposes. Design Cross-sectional survey. Study population Adult Egyptian patients (n=600) at rural and urban hospitals and clinics. Results Less than half of the study population (44.3%) felt that informed consent forms should provide research participants the option to have their blood samples stored for future research. Of these participants, 39.9% thought that consent forms should (...)
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  17. " Enhanced" Interrogation of Detainees: Do Psychologists and Psychiatrists Participate?Halpern Abraham, Halpern John & Doherty Sean - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3.
    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists (...)
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  18. Three Stages of Medical Dialogue.Henry Abramovitch & Eliezer Schwartz - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (2).
    The negative consequences of physicians' failure to establish and maintain personal relationships with patients are at the heart of the humanistic crisis in medicine. To resolve this crisis, a new model of doctor-patient interaction is proposed, based on the ideas of Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue. This model shows how the physican may successfully combine the personal (I-Thou) and impersonal (I-It) aspects of medicine in three stages. These Three Stages of Medical Dialogue include:1. An Initial Personal Meeting stage, which initiates (...)
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  19. A Casebook of Medical Ethics.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    Should a brain-dead woman be artificially maintained for the sake of her fetus? Does a physician have the right to administer a life-saving transfusion despite the patient's religious beliefs? Can a family request a hysterectomy for their retarded daughter? Physicians are facing moral dilemmas with increasing frequency. But how should these delicate questions be resolved and by whom? A Casebook of Medical Ethics offers a real-life view of the central issue involved in clinical medical ethics. Since the analysis of cases (...)
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  20. A Practical Guide to Clinical Ethics Consulting by Christopher Meyers. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2007. 114 Pp. $19.95.: 8080432. [REVIEW]David M. Adams - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):347-350.
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  21. Ethics Expertise and Moral Authority: Is There a Difference?David Michael Adams - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):27-28.
  22. Predictive Testing for Huntington Disease-Response.J. Adams - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):48-48.
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  23. Confidentiality and Huntington's Chorea.J. Adams - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):196-199.
    A doctor has duties towards his patients of both confidentiality and veracity and at times these may conflict, as in the following case. A mother who has the symptoms of Huntington's chorea does not wish her daughters to know. The doctor must try to make her realise how valuable the information can be to the daughters, and thus obtain her consent to inform them. If the mother's consent cannot be obtained, then the doctor must tell the mother that he cannot (...)
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  24. Promoting Social Responsibility Amongst Health Care Users: Medical Tourists' Perspectives on an Information Sheet Regarding Ethical Concerns in Medical Tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:19.
    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from (...)
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  25. Information Rx: Prescribing Good Consumerism and Responsible Citizenship. [REVIEW]Samantha Adams & Antoinette de Bont - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (4):273-290.
    Recent medical informatics and sociological literature has painted the image of a new type of patient—one that is reflexive and informed, with highly specified information needs and perceptions, as well as highly developed skills and tactics for acquiring information. Patients have been re-named “reflexive consumers.” At the same time, literature about the questionable reliability of web-based information has suggested the need to create both user tools that have pre-selected information and special guidelines for individuals to use to check the individual (...)
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  26. The BMA's Guidance on Conscientious Objection May Be Contrary to Human Rights Law.John Olusegun Adenitire - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):260-263.
    It is argued that the current policy of the British Medical Association (BMA) on conscientious objection is not aligned with recent human rights developments. These grant a right to conscientious objection to doctors in many more circumstances than the very few recognised by the BMA. However, this wide-ranging right may be overridden if the refusal to accommodate the conscientious objection is proportionate. It is shown that it is very likely that it is lawful to refuse to accommodate conscientious objections that (...)
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  27. Defining Standard of Care in the Developing World: The Intersection of International Research Ethics and Health Systems Analysis.Liza Dawson Adnan A. Hyder - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (2):142-152.
    ABSTRACTIn recent years there has been intense debate regarding the level of medical care provided to ‘standard care’ control groups in clinical trials in developing countries, particularly when the research sponsors come from wealthier countries. The debate revolves around the issue of how to define a standard of medical care in a country in which many people are not receiving the best methods of medical care available in other settings. In this paper, we argue that additional dimensions of the standard (...)
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  28. Informed Consent in Psychiatry: European Perspectives of Ethics, Law and Clinical Practice.G. Adshead - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):428-429.
  29. Ethics of Psychiatry.G. Adshead - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):357-358.
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  30. Forensic Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Issues.G. Adshead - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):124-125.
  31. The Community of the Excluded: Mental Health and Confidentiality in Prisons.Gwen Adshead - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (6):501-502.
  32. Same but Different: Constructions of Female Violence in Forensic Mental Health.Gwen Adshead - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):41-68.
    We are more alike than we are different.In male prisons, the agency and antisocial mindset of violent offenders is taken seriously in the pursuit of rehabilitation. Male offenders are expected to own full agency for their cruelty and violence to others, and to explore it in supported rehabilitative group-work programs. Such programs have been shown to be highly effective for some offenders and relate to a process of engaging with a new pro-social identity and taking responsibility for leading a "good (...)
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  33. Ethical Issues in Secure Care.Gwen Adshead - 2009 - In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oxford University Press.
  34. Psychiatric Ethics. [REVIEW]Gwen Adshead - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):220-221.
  35. Psychiatric Ethics S Bloch, P Chodoff, S Agreen, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999, 531 Pages,£ 65 (Hb)£ 34.50 (Pb). [REVIEW]Gwen Adshead - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):220-221.
  36. Situating the Trovan Trial With the Use of Experimental Ebola Therapies Is Like Comparing an Apple With an Orange.Muhammed Afolabi - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):19-20.
    I read with great bewilderment the unconvincing arguments of Peter F. Omonzejele in his article “Ethical Challenges Posed by the Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa” published in the 11 issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry. While the author glaringly mixed up anthropological issues concerning the hygiene of hand-washing and safe burials in an article with a title clearly focused on ethical challenges, he failed to establish how the current Ebola epidemic ravaging some West Africa countries made these human (...)
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  37. Views of Patients with Heart Failure About Their Role in the Decision to Start Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Treatment: Prescription Rather Than Participation.A. Agard, R. Lofmark, N. Edvardsson & I. Ekman - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):514-518.
    Background: There is a shortage of reports on what potential recipients of implantable cardioverter–defibrillators need to be informed about and what role they can and want to play in the decision-making process when it comes to whether or not to implant an ICD.Aims: To explore how patients with heart failure and previous episodes of malignant arrhythmia experience and view their role in the decision to initiate ICD treatment.Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews was used. The study (...)
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  38. Causality and Medicine.Joseph Agassi - 1976 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (4):301-317.
    The philosophers of science who viewed causality as a metaphysical headache were right. Yet when they concluded that it is of no scientific import and of less practical import, they were clearly in error. I say clearly because they thereby recommended that we replace cause by mere empirical correlation, which obviously will not do. Here is an obvious example which proves them in error without even touching upon the question of what science is.
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  39. Italy: Old Problems, New Books.Evandro Agazzi - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (4):27-29.
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  40. Nation, Narration, and Health in Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary.Neil Krishan Aggarwal - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities.
    Scholars have mostly analyzed information from mental health practitioners, attorneys, and institutions to critique mental health practices in the War on Terror. These sources offer limited insights into the suffering of detainees. Detainee accounts provide novel information based on their experiences at Guantánamo. Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary is the only text from a current detainee that provides a first-person account of his interrogations and interactions with health professionals. Despite being advertised as a diary, however, it has undergone redaction from (...)
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  41. The Importance of Management for Understanding Managed Care.George G. J. Agich - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):518 – 534.
    This paper argues that the concept of management is critically important for understanding managed care. A proper interpretation of management is needed before a positive account of the ethics of managed care can be constructed. The paper discusses three aspects of management: administrative, clinical, and resource management, and compares the central commitments of traditional medical practice with those of managed care for each of these aspects. In so doing, the distinctive conceptual features of the managed care paradigm are discussed. The (...)
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  42. Ethical Theory and Clinical Ethics Consultation: Toward Understanding the Relationship.George J. Agich - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (9):36-37.
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  43. Truth in Advertising: Reasonable Versus Unreasonable Claims About Improving Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (3):25-26.
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  44. Why I Wrote … Dependence and Autonomy in Old Age.George J. Agich - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):108-110.
  45. Why Quality Is Addressed So Rarely in Clinical Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):339.
    In a practice like ethics consultation, quality and accountability are intertwined. Critics of ethics consultation have complained that clinical ethics consultants exercise power or influence in patient care without sufficient external oversight. Without oversight or external accountability, ethics consultation is seen as more sophistical than philosophical. Although there has been more discussion of accountability, concern for quality in ethics consultation is arguably more important, because it represents a central challenge for the field, namely, how to structure a responsible practice of (...)
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  46. What Kind of Doing is Clinical Ethics?George J. Agich - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1):7-24.
    This paper discusses the importance of Richard M. Zaners work on clinical ethics for answering the question: what kind of doing is ethics consultation? The paper argues first, that four common approaches to clinical ethics – applied ethics, casuistry, principlism, and conflict resolution – cannot adequately address the nature of the activity that makes up clinical ethics; second, that understanding the practical character of clinical ethics is critically important for the field; and third, that the practice of clinical ethics is (...)
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  47. Joining the Team: Ethics Consultation at the Cleveland Clinic. [REVIEW]George J. Agich - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (4):310-322.
  48. The Question of Method in Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):31 – 41.
    This paper offers an exposition of what the question of method in ethics consultation involves under two conditions: when ethics consultation is regarded as a practice and when the question of method is treated systematically. It discusses the concept of the practice and the importance of rules in constituting the actions, cognition, and perceptions of practitioners. The main body of the paper focuses on three elements of the question of method: canon, discipline, and history, which are treated heuristically to outline (...)
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  49. The Salience of Narrative for Bioethics.George J. Agich - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):50-50.
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  50. Response to “From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics” by George J. Agich (CQ Vol 8, No 3).George J. Agich - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):517-523.
    Frank Koughan and Walt Bogdanich's response to my article, reminds me of the Shakespearean line, My article was not about the specifics of the 60Minutes April 13, 1997, story on NHBD at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF), even though the story formed the basis for the reflection. I did not attack the critics, though I do believe that bioethicists are accountable for their scholarly and public pronouncements. Although I do not see why the 60Minutes' story should be treated with deference, (...)
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