Related categories

19731 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 19731
Material to categorize
  1. Data Privacy Protection in Scientific Publications: Process Implementation at a Pharmaceutical Company.Friedrich Maritsch, Ingeborg Cil, Colin McKinnon, Jesse Potash, Nicole Baumgartner, Valérie Philippon & Borislava G. Pavlova - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Background Sharing anonymized/de-identified clinical trial data and publishing research outcomes in scientific journals, or presenting them at conferences, is key to data-driven scientific exchange. However, when data from scientific publications are linked to other publicly available personal information, the risk of reidentification of trial participants increases, raising privacy concerns. Therefore, we defined a set of criteria allowing us to determine and minimize the risk of data reidentification. We also implemented a review process at Takeda for clinical publications prior to submission (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. On the Person in Personal Health Responsibility.Joar Røkke Fystro, Bjørn Hofmann & Eli Feiring - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    In this paper, we start by comparing the two agents, Ann and Bob, who are involved in two car crashes. Whereas Ann crashes her car through no fault of her own, Bob crashes as a result of reckless driving. Unlike Ann, Bob is held criminally responsible, and the insurance company refuses to cover the car’s damages. Nonetheless, Ann and Bob both receive emergency hospital treatment that a third party covers, regardless of any assessment of personal responsibility. What warrants such apparent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. What Does Person‐Centred Care Mean, If You Weren't Considered a Person Anyway: An Engagement with Person‐Centred Care and Black, Queer, Feminist, and Posthuman Approaches.Jamie B. Smith, Eva-Maria Willis & Jane Hopkins-Walsh - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Relaxing Mask Mandates in New Jersey: A Tale of Two Universities.Wesley J. Park - 2022 - Voices in Bioethics 8.
    The ethical question is whether university mask mandates should be relaxed. I argue that the use of face masks by healthy individuals has uncertain benefits, which potential harms may outweigh, and should therefore be voluntary. Systematic reviews by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections concluded that the use of face masks by healthy individuals in the community lacks effectiveness in reducing viral transmission based on moderate-quality evidence. The only two randomized controlled trials of face masks published (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Empathy, Caring and Compassion: Toward a Freudian Critique of Nursing Work.Michael Traynor - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Institutional Trust in Medicine in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.Michał Klincewicz - forthcoming - In The Moral Psychology of Trust. Rowman and Littlefield/Lexington Books: Rowman and Littlefield/Lexington Books.
    It is easier to talk frankly to a person whom one trusts. It is also easier to agree with a scientist whom one trusts. Even though in both cases the psychological state that underlies the behavior is called ‘trust’, it is controversial whether it is a token of the same psychological type. Trust can serve an affective, epistemic, or other social function, and comes to interact with other psychological states in a variety of ways. The way that the functional role (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Clinical Ethical Practice and Associated Factors in Healthcare Facilities in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.Nebiyou Tafesse, Assegid Samuel, Abiyu Geta, Fantanesh Desalegn, Lidia Gebru, Tezera Tadele, Ewnetu Genet, Mulugeta Abate & Kemal Jemal - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Background Clinical ethical practice is required for healthcare workers to improve health-care delivery. However, there are gaps between accepted ethical standards and CEP in Ethiopia. There have been limited studies conducted on CEP in the country. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the magnitude and associated factors of CEP among healthcare workers in healthcare facilities in Ethiopia. Method From February to April 2021, a mixed-method study was conducted in 24 health facilities, combining quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative and qualitative data (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Freighted Social Histories of HIV and Hepatitis C: Exploring Service Providers’ Perspectives on Stigma in the Current Epidemics.Kylie Valentine, Anthony Smith, Asha Persson, Rebecca Gray, Joanne Bryant, Myra Hamilton, Jack Wallace, Kerryn Drysdale & Christy E. Newman - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2022-012382.
    A virus has a social history. In the case of the hepatitis C virus and HIV, this history is one involving stigma and discrimination, advocacy and activism, and recent dramatic improvements in treatment. These social histories influence the experience of people who live with the viruses, and those who work with them. One aspect of this is the impact of social changes on the biographical disruption and integration brought about by illness. Healthcare practitioners who see significant improvements in the effectiveness (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Military Medical Ethics in Contemporary Armed Conflict: Mobilizing Medicine in the Pursuit of Just War Michael L. Gross Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2021. 304 Pp. ISBN 978‐0190694944. £29.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):731-732.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 6, Page 731-732, July 2022.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Using Ricoeur's Notions on Narrative Interpretation as a Resource in Supporting Person‐Centredness in Health and Social Care.Staffan Josephsson, Joakim Öhlén, Margarita Mondaca, Manuel Guerrero, Mark Luborsky & Maria Lindström - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Evolution in Health and Medical Humanities Education: A Proposal for Accreditation.Sarah L. Berry, Anna-Leila Williams, Erin Gentry Lamb & Craig M. Klugman - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012377.
    The growth of Health and Medical Humanities baccalaureate and master’s degrees in recent decades makes the present moment ideal for initiating field-defining conversations among health humanities constituents about the boundaries of this transdisciplinary field. Focusing on accreditation at the programme level rather than the individual level, we explore four models with different advantages for Health and Medical Humanities: a certification for practice; a network ; a programme of merit model; and consultancy. We conclude that for a young field like health (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Jennifer S. Blumenthal-Barby, Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioral Economics for Medical Ethics.Stephen M. Campbell & Moti Gorin - 2022 - Ethics 132 (4):881-885.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Objectivity in the Historiography of COVID-19 Pandemic.Orhan Onder - 2022 - History and Philosophy of Medicine 4 (3):1-3.
    The world is facing a once-in-a-lifetime situation: the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic, the World Health Organization announced an infodemic as well. This infodemic caused infollution and sparked many controversies. Pandemics as extraordinary occurrences are always attractive to historians. However, infodemics and biased information threaten objective history-writing. Objectivity as it regards historians is already a much-discussed subject. In this commentary, the fundamental theories about objectivity are delineated. Second, the relationship between the infodemic and COVID-19 pandemic is explained. Lastly, the problems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Global Health Humanities in Transition.Narin Hassan & Jessica Howell - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):133-137.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Parasites and Priorities: The Early Evolution of ‘Neglected Disease’ Initiatives and the History of a Global Health Agenda.Mari Kathryn Webel - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):177-189.
    This article explores the development and evolution of ‘neglected tropical diseases’ as an operative and imaginative category in global public health, focusing on the early intellectual and institutional development of the category in the 1970s. It examines early work around ‘neglected’ diseases in the Rockefeller Foundation’s Health Sciences Division, specifically the Foundation’s ‘Great Neglected Diseases of Mankind’ initiative that ran between 1978 and 1988, as well as intersections with the WHO’s parallel Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Global Health Wars: A Rhetorical Review of Global Health Critique.Raquel Baldwinson - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):200-210.
    The critique of global health is a longstanding tradition in the global health humanities. Typically, this critique takes an expected tack: critics take a slice of global health, identify its rhetoric, expose its power, and elucidate its unanticipated consequences. Here, I subject global health critique to its own approach—conducting a ‘rhetorical review’ of global health critique in order to ascertain whether it has rhetoric, power and unanticipated consequences of its own. Following this review, I find that global health critique has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. COVID-19 Narratives and Layered Temporality.Jessica Howell - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):211-220.
    The essay outlines the ways in which narrative approaches to COVID-19 can draw on imaginative literature and critical oral history to resist the ‘closure’ often offered by cultural representations of epidemics. To support this goal, it analyses science and speculative fiction by Alejandro Morales and Tananarive Due in terms of how these works create alternative temporalities, which undermine colonial and racist medical discourse. The essay then examines a new archive of emerging autobiographical illness narratives, namely online Facebook posts and oral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Xenotransplantation and Borders: Two Indian Narratives.Meenakshi Srihari - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):153-158.
    This paper examines two Indian texts, Anand Gandhi’s film The Ship of Theseus and Manjula Padmanabhan’s play Harvest, which deal with complex biopolitical and geopolitical questions around organ transplantation, for their treatment of corporeal, geopolitical and ethical borders.By dramatising the lives of carriers who are both receivers and donors, the texts enact boundaries, visible and invisible, from both sides. I focus on the carrier of the diseased organ—already a stranger, as Jean-Luc Nancy describes his own failing heart in L’Intrus —and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Writing the Worlds of Genomic Medicine: Experiences of Using Participatory-Writing to Understand Life with Rare Conditions.Richard Gorman & Bobbie Farsides - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e4-e4.
    The diagnostic and treatment possibilities made possible by the development and subsequent mainstreaming of clinical genomics services have the potential to profoundly change the experiences of families affected by rare genetic conditions. Understanding the potentials of genomic medicine requires that we consider the perspectives of those who engage with such services; there are substantial social implications involved. There are increasing calls to think more creatively, and draw on more participatory approaches, in evoking rich accounts of lived experience. In this article, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Exploring the Intersection of Critical Disability Studies, Humanities and Global Health Through a Case Study of Scarf Injuries in Bangladesh.Anna Tupetz, Marion Quirici, Mohsina Sultana, Kazi Imdadul Hoque, Kearsley Alison Stewart & Michel Landry - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):169-176.
    This article puts critical disability studies and global health into conversation around the phenomenon of scarf injury in Bangladesh. Scarf injury occurs when a woman wearing a long, traditional scarf called an orna rides in a recently introduced autorickshaw with a design flaw that allows the orna to become entangled in the vehicle’s driveshaft. Caught in the engine, the orna pulls the woman’s neck into hyperextension, causing a debilitating high cervical spinal cord injury and quadriplegia. The circumstances of the scarf (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Narratives of Prevention and Redemption in Opioid Overdose Obituaries.Elizabeth Troutman Adams & Mara Buchbinder - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e5-e5.
    Obituaries of people who died from an opioid overdose represent a new territory for understanding cultural narratives of the US opioid epidemic. Drawing on textual analysis of 30 opioid overdose obituaries published on Legacy.com between 2015 and 2020, we describe a prototypical narrative conveyed through opioid overdose obituaries, which renders symbolic meaning through the voices of the bereaved. Obituary authors reimagine their subjects as tragic heroes and reconstitute opioid addiction as a curse, plight or affliction that befalls its victims. Many (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Decolonising ‘Man’, Resituating Pandemic: An Intervention in the Pathogenesis of Colonial Capitalism.Rosemary J. Jolly - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):221-229.
    This paper brings together fifth-wave public health theory and a decolonised approach to the human informed by the Caribbean thinker, Sylvia Wynter, and the primary exponent of African Humanism, Es’kia Mpahlele. Sub-Saharan indigenous ways of thinking the human as co-constitutive in a subject we might call human-animal-‘environment’, in conjunction with the subcontinent’s experiences of colonial damage in disease ‘prevention’ and ‘treatment’, demonstrate the lack of genuine engagement with Indigenous wisdom in Western medical practice.The paper offers a decolonial reading of pandemic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Call for Emergency Action to Limit Global Temperature Increases, Restore Biodiversity and Protect Health.Lukoye Atwoli, Abdullah H. Baqui, Thomas Benfield, Raffaella Bosurgi, Fiona Godlee, Stephen Hancocks, Richard Horton, Laurie Laybourn-Langton, Carlos Augusto Monteiro, Ian Norman, Kirsten Patrick, Nigel Praities, Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert, Eric J. Rubin, Peush Sahni, Richard Smith, Nicholas J. Talley, Sue Turale & Damián Vázquez - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e3-e3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. In Good Hands: The Phenomenological Significance of Human Touch for Nursing Practices.Gillian Lemermeyer - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):230-237.
    Prevailing understandings of the nurse’s touch tend to be focused on its consoling, instrumental and communicative utility. What seems to be missing is an exploration of the ethical and existential significance of the nurse’s touch. As an aspect of nearly every human experience, touch has a depth and breadth of meanings that are hard to compass. We experience the world through our bodies, feeling our way through our lives. In the nurse’s world, touching contact with the person in care is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. African Perspectives of Moral Status: A Framework for Evaluating Global Bioethical Issues.Caesar Alimsinya Atuire - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):238-245.
    This paper offers an African perspective on moral status grounded on an understanding of personhood. These concepts are key to understanding the differences in emphasis and the values at play when global ethical issues are analysed within the African context. Drawing from African philosophical reflections on the descriptive and normative concepts of personhood, I propose a dual notion of subject and object moral status. I explain how object moral status, duties owed to persons, is differently grounded with respect to subject (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Biocolonial Pregnancies: Louise Erdrich’s Future Home of the Living God.Anna Kemball - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):159-168.
    This article argues that the health humanities must examine biocolonialism if it is to attend to Native American experiences of reproductive healthcare in the USA. Reproductive healthcare abuses are brought into dialogue with Native American resistance to Western biomedical sciences in Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich. Written over the course of two reinstatements of the Mexico City Policy, Erdrich’s novel invites a consideration of biocolonialism in relation to the exploitation and policing of female bodies.After a discussion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Narrative Trajectories of Disaster Response: Ethical Preparedness From Katrina to COVID-19.Yoshiko Iwai, Sarah Holdren, Leah Teresa Rosen & Nina Y. Hu - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e8-e8.
    While COVID-19 brings unprecedented challenges to the US healthcare system, understanding narratives of historical disasters illuminates ethical complexities shared with COVID-19. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina revealed a lack of disaster preparation and protocol, not dissimilar to the challenges faced by COVID-19 healthcare workers. A case study of Memorial Hospital during Hurricane Katrina reported by journalist-MD Sheri Fink reveals unique ethical challenges at the forefront of health crises. These challenges include disproportionate suffering in structurally vulnerable populations, as seen in COVID-19 where (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. ‘I Will Never Love Anyone Like That Again’: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and the Pathologisation and Medicalisation of Ordinary Experiences.Sahanika Ratnayake - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e7-e7.
    Psychiatry has a long history of being criticised for the pathologisation and medicalisation of ordinary experiences. One of the most prominent of these critiques is advanced by Allan Horwitz and Jerome Wakefield who argue that instances of ordinary sadness in response to events such as bereavement, heartbreak and misfortune, are being mistakenly diagnosed as depression due to an increasing lack of consideration for aetiology and contextual factors. Critiques concerning pathologisation and medicalisation have not been forthcoming for psychiatry’s close cousin, psychotherapy. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. When Numbers Eclipse Narratives: A Cultural-Political Critique of the ‘Ethical’ Impacts of Short-Term Experiences in Global Health in Dominican Republic Bateyes.Brenda K. Wilson - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):190-199.
    With the rising demand for short-term experiences in global health is an ever-increasing volume of literature that focuses attention on ethics and ethical concerns, such as the effects of STEGH on host populations. Such concerns have driven the development of ethical principles and guidelines, with discussions and debates largely centred around normative questions of positive/negative and benefit/harm for us/them. Using a critical medical humanities lens, this paper blurs these dichotomous framings and offers a more complex understanding of the effects and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Nations Must Be Defended: Public Health, Enmity and Immunity in Katherine Mayo’s Mother India.Sandhya Shetty - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):144-152.
    This essay explores repressed hostility and punitive fantasies in the discourse of international health, using Katherine Mayo’s Mother India. Multiple tendencies in interwar thinking converge in Mayo’s book, making it a veritable archive of major, minor and emergent forces, including those shaping the phenomenon of ‘international health’ post-Versailles. Mother India provides a unique opportunity to explore how progressive principles of international public health tend to obscure a ‘minor’ and forgettable yet disturbing truth: the discourse on life and health can ‘safely’ (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. ‘Living in a Material World’: Frankenstein and New Materialism.Jasmine Yong Hall - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):e6-e6.
    This paper uses concepts from Karen Barad’s theories from quantum physics and other theoretical approaches from new materialism to show how Frankenstein can be used to introduce this new framework and to challenge an older one based on dualism, representationalism and individualism. A new ethical understanding of the message of the text emerges from this reading—one that rethinks the prohibitions against ‘playing God’ or creating the unnatural and relies instead on an ethics of care.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. A ‘Prodigious Latitude’ of Words: Vocabularies of Illness in 18th-Century Medical Treatises and Women’s Writing.Heather Meek - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):253-260.
    In its examination of a selection of 18th-century medical treatises and women’s writing, this essay considers a range of context-specific and historically specific medical vocabularies and tries to illuminate the various linguistic registers of physicians’ and women’s understandings and experiences of physio-emotional illness. In a preprofessionalised world in which medical and literary cultures overlapped significantly and medical knowledge was not yet restricted to a group of formally trained male elites, vocabularies of illness abounded, oftentimes moving freely between the permeable disciplinary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Sea of Bodies: A Medical Discourse of the Refugee Crisis in Tears of Salt: A Doctor’s Story.Lava Asaad & Matthew Spencer - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):138-143.
    In the memoir Tears of Salt: A Doctor’s Story, Pietro Bartolo relates visceral descriptions of illness, injury and death endured by refugees on their journey of escape to the shores of Lampedusa in the Mediterranean. The medical gaze of the doctor/author further complicates the political and philosophical discourse of mass migration, foregrounding and calling into question the myriad ways in which the migrating human body is subjugated to forms of structural violence that render it ungrievable and inhuman. The migrating body, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. ‘Working in a Comfort Formerly Unknown’: Medical Holism and the Radical Ambitions Behind Interwar Bermondsey’s Foot Clinic.Christopher T. Mitchell - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (2):246-252.
    In 1930, the Bermondsey Public Health Department made the rather unusual decision to establish the first municipal foot clinic in Britain. This pioneering and popular clinic was founded at a time when the aims of public health were being renegotiated. Historical discussion of the reconceptualisation of public health in the interwar period typically depicts a paradigm shift in which public health was no longer focused solely on sanitising the physical environment, but was characterised by an additional, separate aim: the development (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Taming Wickedness: Towards an Implementation Framework for Medical Ethics.Erin Taylor - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    “Wicked” problems are characterized by intractable complexity, uncertainty, and conflict between individuals or institutions, and they inhabit almost every corner of medical ethics. Despite wide acceptance of the same ethical principles, we nevertheless disagree about how to formulate such problems, how to solve them, what would count as solving them, or even what the possible solutions are. That is, we don’t always know how best to implement ethical ideals in messy real-world contexts. I sketch an implementation framework for medical ethics (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Art of Medicine: From Small Beginnings: To Build an Anti-Eugenic Future.Benedict Ipgrave, Miroslava Chavez-Garcia, Marcy Darnovsky, Subhadra Das, Charlene Galarneau, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Nora Ellen Groce, Tony Platt, Milton Reynolds, Marius Turda & Robert A. Wilson - 2022 - The Lancet 10339 (399):1934-1935.
    Short overview of the From Small Beginnings Project and its relevance for resisting eugenics in contemporary society.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Personal Identity, Possible Worlds, and Medical Ethics.Nils-Frederic Wagner - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    Thought experiments that concoct bizarre possible world modalities are standard fare in debates on personal identity. Appealing to intuitions raised by such evocations is often taken to settle differences between conflicting theoretical views that, albeit, have practical implications for ethical controversies of personal identity in health care. Employing thought experiments that way is inadequate, I argue, since personhood is intrinsically linked to constraining facts about the actual world. I defend a moderate modal skepticism according to which intuiting across conceptually incongruent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Genetic Technologies Questionnaire: Lay Judgments About Genetic Technologies Align with Ethical Theory, Are Coherent, and Predict Behaviour.Svenja Küchenhoff, Johannes Doerflinger & Nora Heinzelmann - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (54).
    -/- Policy regulations of ethically controversial genetic technologies should, on the one hand, be based on ethical principles. On the other hand, they should be socially acceptable to ensure implementation. In addition, they should align with ethical theory. Yet to date we lack a reliable and valid scale to measure the relevant ethical judgements in laypeople. We target this lacuna. -/- We developed a scale based on ethical principles to elicit lay judgments: the Genetic Technologies Questionnaire (GTQ). In two pilot (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Beyond ‘Born Not Made’: Challenging Character, Emotions and Professionalism in Undergraduate Medical Education.Marie Allitt & Sally Frampton - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012365.
    In this article we explore the historical antecedents and ongoing perpetuation of the idea that medical professionals must adhere to a specific ‘character’. In the late nineteenth century, an ideal of the medical student as ‘born not made’ was substantiated through medical school opening addresses and other medical literature. An understanding prevailed that students would have a natural inclination that would suit them to medical work, which was predicated on class structures. As we move into the twentieth-century context, we see (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. (De)Troubling Transparency: Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Clinical Applications.Peter David Winter & Annamaria Carusi - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012318.
    Artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques occupy a prominent role in medical research in terms of the innovation and development of new technologies. However, while many perceive AI as a technology of promise and hope—one that is allowing for more early and accurate diagnosis—the acceptance of AI and ML technologies in hospitals remains low. A major reason for this is the lack of transparency associated with these technologies, in particular epistemic transparency, which results in AI disturbing or troubling established knowledge (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Fatherlessness, Sperm Donors and ‘so What?’ Parentage: Arguing Against the Immorality of Donor Conception Through ‘World Literature’.Grace Halden - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012328.
    Is biology and knowing biological ancestral information essential to the construction of identity? Bioethicist James David Velleman believes this is the case and argues that donor gamete conception is immoral because a portion of genetic heritage will be unknown. Velleman is critical of sperm donation and the absence of a biological father in donor-assisted families. His bioethical work, specifically the 2005 article ‘Family History’, is oft-cited in articles debating the ethics surrounding gamete donations and diverse family formations. However, I wonder (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Biopower Under a State of Exception: Stories of Dying and Grieving Alone During COVID-19 Emergency Measures.J. Cristian Rangel, Dave Holmes, Amélie Perron & Granville E. Miller - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012255.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions for visitors and caregivers in healthcare settings and long-term care facilities were enacted in the larger context of public health policies that included physical distancing and shelter-in-place orders. Older persons residing in LTC facilities constituted over half of the mortality statistics across Canada during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the poststructuralist work of Agamben, Foucault and Mbembe we conducted a thematic analysis on news reports. The extracts of media stories presented in our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioral Economics for Medical Ethics.Heloise Robinson - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):188-191.
    There has been a significant growth in the literature on nudging and behavioural economics, since Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein published their well-known book Nudge: Improving Decisions about H...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The Unnaturalistic Fallacy: COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Should Not Discriminate Against Natural Immunity.Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca C. H. Brown & Dominic Wilkinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):371-377.
    COVID-19 vaccine requirements have generated significant debate. Here, we argue that, on the evidence available, such policies should have recognised proof of natural immunity as a sufficient basis for exemption to vaccination requirements. We begin by distinguishing our argument from two implausible claims about natural immunity: natural immunity is superior to ‘artificial’ vaccine-induced immunity simply because it is ‘natural’ and it is better to acquire immunity through natural infection than via vaccination. We then briefly survey the evidence base for the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  45. Patient Consent Preferences on Sharing Personal Health Information During the COVID-19 Pandemic: “The More Informed We Are, the More Likely We Are to Help”.Sarah Tosoni, Indu Voruganti, Katherine Lajkosz, Shahbano Mustafa, Anne Phillips, S. Joseph Kim, Rebecca K. S. Wong, Donald Willison, Carl Virtanen, Ann Heesters & Fei-Fei Liu - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Background Rapid ethical access to personal health information to support research is extremely important during pandemics, yet little is known regarding patient preferences for consent during such crises. This follow-up study sought to ascertain whether there were differences in consent preferences between pre-pandemic times compared to during Wave 1 of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and to better understand the reasons behind these preferences. Methods A total of 183 patients in the pandemic cohort completed the survey via email, and responses were (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Are Conscientious Objectors Morally Obligated to Refer?Samuel Reis-Dennis & Abram Brummett - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In this paper, we argue that providers who conscientiously refuse to provide legal and professionally accepted medical care are not always morally required to refer their patients to willing providers. Indeed, we will argue that refusing to refer is morally admirable in certain instances. In making the case, we show that belief in a sweeping moral duty to refer depends on an implicit assumption that the procedures sanctioned by legal and professional norms are ethically permissible. Focusing on examples of female (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. A Chronological Discourse Analysis of Ancillary Care Provision in Guidance Documents for Research Conduct in the Global South.Blessings M. Kapumba, Nicola Desmond & Janet Seeley - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Introduction Numerous guidelines and policies for ethical research practice have evolved over time, how this translates to global health practice in resource-constrained settings is unclear. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the concept of ancillary care has evolved over time and how it is included in the ethics guidelines and policy documents that guide the conduct of research in the global south with both an international focus and providing a specific example of Malawi, where the first author (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Mapping the Ethical Issues of Digital Twins for Personalised Healthcare Service.Pei-Hua Huang, Ki-hun Kim & Maartje Schermer - 2022 - Journal of Medical Internet Research 24 (1):e33081.
    Background: The concept of digital twins has great potential for transforming the existing health care system by making it more personalized. As a convergence of health care, artificial intelligence, and information and communication technologies, personalized health care services that are developed under the concept of digital twins raise a myriad of ethical issues. Although some of the ethical issues are known to researchers working on digital health and personalized medicine, currently, there is no comprehensive review that maps the major ethical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. COVID-19 Vaccination and the Right to Take Risks.Pei-Hua Huang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The rare but severe cerebral venous thrombosis occurring in some AstraZeneca vaccine recipients has prompted some governments to suspend part of their COVID-19 vaccination programmes. Such suspensions have faced various challenges from both scientific and ethical angles. Most of the criticisms against such suspensions follow a consequentialist approach, arguing that the suspension will lead to more harm than benefits. In this paper, I propose a rights-based argument against the suspension of the vaccine rollouts amid this highly time-sensitive combat of COVID-19. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The COVID-19 Vaccine Patent: A Right Without Rationale.Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi & Ali Adil Kashef Al-Ghetaa - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2022-012386.
    Since the approval of COVID-19 vaccines, international efforts have intensified on vaccination schemes perceived as the only light at the end of the tunnel. Governments are working tirelessly to scale up the number of vaccinated people, just as vaccine manufacturers are stretching their facilities to meet the increasing demand for doses. The international community is trying to help the poorest countries in the world by improving vaccine supplies and removing obstacles. In this regard, India and South Africa have applied to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 19731