About this topic
Summary The allocation of medical resources is a subfield within more general concerns about distributive justice. As such, much discussion of healthcare allocation uses familiar terms and theories from this broader area. However, it is also a subject that has been seen by many to have particular importance, due to the central importance that health plays in human lives. Resource allocations are typically driven by two competing factors: 'efficiency' (on the grounds that we should want resources in a social institution like medicine to bring about more benefit rather than less) and 'equality' (on the grounds people can suffer to differing degrees from ill health, and we should have some preference to help those who are worse off). Broadly speaking, many discussions of health care allocation are discussions of how to understand, and how to make commensurable, these two competing considerations. More recently, there has also been a turn towards the idea that since there may be no single, uniquely acceptable way of allocating medical resources, a theory of fair medical allocation must include some discussion of procedural principles, i.e. principles that relate to the process by which actual allocation decisions are made. 
Key works Bognar & Hirose 2014 Daniels 2007
Introductions Cookson & Dolan 2000 Buchanan 1984
Related categories

423 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 423
  1. added 2020-05-20
    Respecting Disability Rights — Toward Improved Crisis Standards of Care.Michelle M. Mello, Govind Persad & Douglas B. White - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine:DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2011997.
    We propose six guideposts that states and hospitals should follow to respect disability rights when designing policies for the allocation of scarce, lifesaving medical treatments. Four relate to criteria for decisions. First, do not use categorical exclusions, especially ones based on disability or diagnosis. Second, do not use perceived quality of life. Third, use hospital survival and near-term prognosis (e.g., death expected within a few years despite treatment) but not long-term life expectancy. Fourth, when patients who use ventilators in their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-05-01
    Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly.Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. added 2020-04-11
    Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources in the Time of Covid-19.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Ross Upshur, Beatriz Thome, Michael Parker, Aaron Glickman, Cathy Zhang, Connor Boyle & James P. Phillips - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine:10.1056/NEJMsb2005114.
    Four ethical values — maximizing benefits, treating equally, promoting and rewarding instrumental value, and giving priority to the worst off — yield six specific recommendations for allocating medical resources in the Covid-19 pandemic: maximize benefits; prioritize health workers; do not allocate on a first-come, first-served basis; be responsive to evidence; recognize research participation; and apply the same principles to all Covid-19 and non–Covid-19 patients.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. added 2020-04-03
    Allocation of Scarce Biospecimens for Use in Research.Leah Pierson, Sophia Gibert, Benjamin Berkman, Marion Danis & Joseph Millum - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105766.
    Hundreds of millions of rare biospecimens are stored in laboratories and biobanks around the world. Often, the researchers who possess these specimens do not plan to use them, while other researchers limit the scope of their work because they cannot acquire biospecimens that meet their needs. This situation raises an important and underexplored question: how should scientists allocate biospecimens that they do not intend to use? We argue that allocators should aim to maximise the social value of the research enterprise (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2020-02-25
    The Fifth Face of Fair Subject Selection: Population Grouping.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (2):41-43.
    The article by MacKay and Saylor (2020) claims that the principle of fair subject selection yields conflicting imperatives (e.g. in the case of pregnant women) and should be understood as “a bundle of four distinct sub-principles” (i.e. fair inclusion, burden sharing, opportunity, distribution of third-party risks), each having conflicting normative recommendations (MacKay and Saylor 2020). The authors also offer guidance as to how we should navigate between subprinciples that may conflict with each other. The problem is a crucial one since (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2020-02-11
    Rationing Health Care in America: Perceptions and Principles of Justice. Larry R. Churchill. [REVIEW]Norman Daniels - 1989 - Ethics 99 (2):444-445.
    Churchill argues that every society rations health care-the problem is to do so justly. The central claim of the book is that a more "social" or communitarian starting point is needed. The book concludes with a brief discussion of health care rights and a sketchy account of the role of the physician in rationing.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7. added 2020-02-11
    Triage and Justice: The Ethics of Rationing Life-Saving Medical Resources. [REVIEW]Peter Singer - 1983 - Ethics 94 (1):142-143.
  8. added 2020-02-03
    Medicine: The Public Good and One's Own.Walsh McDermott - 1978 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (2):167-187.
  9. added 2020-01-29
    Some Ethical Issues in Research Involving Human Subjects.LeRoy Walters, Carlos A. Schaffenburg & Samuel Stearns - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (2):193-214.
  10. added 2020-01-29
    An Appearance of Genocide: A Review of Governmental Family-Planning Program Policies. [REVIEW]James E. Allen - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (2):300-306.
  11. added 2020-01-22
    The Impact of New Community Health Programs on One Medical Teaching Institution.David E. Rogers - 1972 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 15 (3):326-333.
  12. added 2019-12-13
    The Case for Valuing Non-Health and Indirect Benefits.Govind Persad & Jessica du Toit - 2020 - In Ole F. Norheim, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Joseph Millum (eds.), Global Health Priority-Setting: Beyond Cost-Effectiveness. New York, NY, USA: pp. 207-222.
    Health policy is only one part of social policy. Although spending administered by the health sector constitutes a sizeable fraction of total state spending in most countries, other sectors such as education and transportation also represent major portions of national budgets. Additionally, though health is one important aspect of economic and social activity, people pursue many other goals in their social and economic lives. Similarly, direct benefits—those that are immediate results of health policy choices—are only a small portion of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. added 2019-12-06
    Epidemiology and Ethics.John M. Last - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (3-4):166-174.
  14. added 2019-12-03
    The Role of Community Engagement in Novel HIV Research in Infants.Seema K. Shah & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (3):344-347.
    The proposed study would be a single-arm interventional trial in a community where HIV is endemic. The proposed observational design can provide confirmatory data for the initial clinical observation, data that would be necessary before considering whether a randomized controlled trial is appropriate. A previous ethical analysis has argued for conducting such a study in a country with limited resources and with higher HIV prevalence, and to recruit those with the highest risk of transmission. The primary rationale was to address (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2019-10-10
    Solidarity and Responsibility in Health Care.Ben Davies & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):133-144.
    Some healthcare systems are said to be grounded in solidarity because healthcare is funded as a form of mutual support. This article argues that health care systems that are grounded in solidarity have the right to penalise some users who are responsible for their poor health. This derives from the fact that solidary systems involve both rights and obligations and, in some cases, those who avoidably incur health burdens violate obligations of solidarity. Penalties warranted include direct patient contribution to costs, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. added 2019-10-10
    Health(Care) and the Temporal Subject.Ben Davies - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (3):38-64.
    Many assume that theories of distributive justice must obviously take people’s lifetimes, and only their lifetimes, as the relevant period across which we distribute. Although the question of the temporal subject has risen in prominence, it is still relatively underdeveloped, particularly in the sphere of health and healthcare. This paper defends a particular view, “momentary sufficientarianism,” as being an important element of healthcare justice. At the heart of the argument is a commitment to pluralism about justice, where theorizing about just (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2019-10-10
    Is Efficiency Ethical? Resource Issues in Health Care.Donna Dickenson - 1995 - In Brenda Almond (ed.), Introducing Applied Ethics. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 229-246.
    How can we allocate scarce health care resources justly? In particular, are markets the most efficient way to deliver health services? Much blood, sweat and ink has been shed over this issue, but rarely has either faction challenged the unspoken assumption behind the claim made by advocates of markets: that efficiency advances the interests of both individuals and society. Whether markets actually do increase efficiency is arguably a matter for economists, but the deeper ethical question is whether efficiency is the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. added 2019-10-10
    Nurse Time as a Scarce Healthcare Resource.Donna Dickenson - 1994 - In Geoffrey Hunt (ed.), Ethical issues in nursing. London: Routledge. pp. 207-217.
    For a long time, discussion about scarce health care resource allocation was limited to allocation of medical resources, with the paradigmatic case being kidney transplants. This narrow focus on medical resource prevents us from seeing that there are many cases-- perhaps even the majority--in which time is the real scarce resource, particularly nurse time. What ethical principles should apply to nurse time as a scarce health care resource?
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2019-09-27
    Medical Crowdfunding, Political Marginalization, and Government Responsiveness: A Reply to Larry Temkin.Alida Liberman - 2019 - Journal of Practical Ethics 7 (1):40-48.
    Larry Temkin draws on the work of Angus Deaton to argue that countries with poor governance sometimes rely on charitable giving and foreign aid in ways that enable them to avoid relying on their own citizens; this can cause them to be unresponsive to their citizens’ needs and thus prevent the long-term alleviation of poverty and other social problems. I argue that the implications of this “lack of government responsiveness argument” (or LOGRA) are both broader and narrower than they might (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2019-07-16
    Considering Quality of Life While Repudiating Disability Injustice: A Pathways Approach to Setting Priorities.Govind Persad - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):294-303.
    This article proposes a novel strategy, one that draws on insights from antidiscrimination law, for addressing a persistent challenge in medical ethics and the philosophy of disability: whether health systems can consider quality of life without unjustly discriminating against individuals with disabilities. It argues that rather than uniformly considering or ignoring quality of life, health systems should take a more nuanced approach. Under the article's proposal, health systems should treat cases where quality of life suffers because of disability-focused exclusion or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. added 2019-06-25
    First Come, First Served?Tyler M. John & Joseph Millum - 2019 - Ethics 130 (2):179-207.
    Waiting time is widely used in health and social policy to make resource allocation decisions, yet no general account of the moral significance of waiting time exists. We provide such an account. We argue that waiting time is not intrinsically morally significant, and that the first person in a queue for a resource does not ipso facto have a right to receive that resource first. However, waiting time can and sometimes should play a role in justifying allocation decisions. First, there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. added 2019-06-12
    Sufficiency, Comprehensiveness of Health Care Coverage, and Cost-Sharing Arrangements in the Realpolitik of Health Policy.Govind Persad & Harald Schmidt - 2016 - In Carina Fourie & Annette Rid (eds.), What is Enough?: Sufficiency, Justice, and Health. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 267-280.
    This chapter explores two questions in detail: How should we determine the threshold for costs that individuals are asked to bear through insurance premiums or care-related out-of-pocket costs, including user fees and copayments? and What is an adequate relationship between costs and benefits? This chapter argues that preventing impoverishment is a morally more urgent priority than protecting households against income fluctuations, and that many health insurance plans may not adequately protect individuals from health care costs that threaten to drop their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2019-06-10
    How Much is Due to Health Care Providers?Albert Weale - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:97-109.
    How much by way of economic reward is due to health care providers? Although this problem usually presents itself as a practical matter of policy, it has buried within it a number of philosophical issues, for it can be regarded as a question in the theory of economic justice. The formal principle of justice is that we should render persons what is due to them. But on what consideration in the case of health care providers can we make an assessment (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2019-06-10
    Good, Fairness and QALYs.John Broome - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23 (1):57-73.
    Counting QALYs has been proposed as a way of deciding how resources should be distributed in the health service: put resources where they will produce the most QALYs. This proposal has encountered strong opposition. There has been a disagreement between some economists favouring QALYs and some philosophers opposing them. But the argument has, I think, mostly been at cross-purposes. Those in favour of QALYs point out what they can do, and those against point out what they can't. There need be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. added 2019-06-10
    Quality of Life and Resource Allocation.Michael Lockwood - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:33-55.
    A new word has recently entered the British medical vocabulary. What it stands for is neither a disease nor a cure. At least, it is not a cure for a disease in the medical sense. But it could, perhaps, be thought of as an intended cure for a medicosociological disease: namely that of haphazard or otherwise ethically inappropriate allocation of scarce medical resources. What I have in mind is the term ‘QALY’, which is an acronym standing for quality adjusted life (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26. added 2019-06-06
    Justified Commitments? Considering Resource Allocation and Fairness in Médecins Sans Frontières‐Holland.Lisa Fuller - 2006 - Developing World Bioethics 6 (2):59-70.
    Non‐governmental aid programs are an important source of health care for many people in the developing world. Despite the central role non‐governmental organizations play in the delivery of these vital services, for the most part they either lack formal systems of accountability to their recipients altogether, or have only very weak requirements in this regard. This is because most NGOs are both self‐mandating and self‐regulating. What is needed in terms of accountability is some means by which all the relevant stakeholders (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27. added 2019-06-06
    Ageing, Autonomy and Resources. Edited by A Harry Lesser. [REVIEW]Julian Hughes - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):69-69.
  28. added 2019-06-06
    Accumulating Resources in Perinatal Intensive Care Centers: Market Strategies and Ethical Issues.Barbara Bridgman Perkins - 1993 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 12 (2):51-66.
    This paper engages in the ongoing dialog on "justice and the health care 'industry"'1 and addresses the question of whether market strategies are consistent with an ethical distribution of resources in health care. As it pertains to the development of perinatal services over the past twenty-five to thirty years in the United States, my short answer to this question is "no." Business organization and market-oriented strategies have contributed to the creation and extensive growth of perinatal intensive care centers located in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. added 2019-06-05
    Placebo Effects and Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities: An Unjust and Underexplored Connection.Phoebe Friesen & Charlotte Blease - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (11):774-781.
    While a significant body of bioethical literature considers how the placebo effect might introduce a conflict between autonomy and beneficence, the link between justice and the placebo effect has been neglected. Here, we bring together disparate evidence from the field of placebo studies and research on health inequalities related to race and ethnicity, and argue that, collectively, this evidence may provide the basis for an unacknowledged route by which health disparities are exacerbated. This route is constituted by an uneven distribution (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2019-06-05
    The Political Ethics of Health.Daniel Weinstock - 2010 - Les Ateliers de L’Ethique 5 (1):105-118.
    This paper seeks to provide an overview of some of the main areas of debate that have emerged in recent years at the interface between theories of justice and health care. First, the paper consi- ders various positions as to what the index of justice with respect to health ought to be. It warns on practical and principled grounds against conceptual inflation of the notion of "health" as it appears in theories of distributive justice. Second, it considers how various standards (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. added 2019-06-05
    Allocating Scarce Medical Resources: Roman Catholic Perspectives. [REVIEW]Heather Widdows - 2006 - Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):116-120.
  32. added 2019-06-05
    Case Studies in Bioethics: Who Has First Claim on Health Care Resources?James Childress & Joseph Fletcher - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (4):13.
  33. added 2019-05-30
    Ethische Aspekte der Regularisierung ärztlichen HandelnsThe ethical aspect of regularisation in medicine.Frank Praetorius & Stephan Sahm - 2001 - Ethik in der Medizin 13 (4):221-242.
    Diminishing resources seem to be forcing rationing of medical services. Rationing the public health care system means that there needs to be ethical discussion on justice. Several years before resource allocation could impact on the levels of morbidity and mortality, economic problems created numerous methods of regulating medical and nursing services. In clinical practice, regularisation means a reduction of the possibility to decide autonomously and therefore requires specific ethical discussion. The different methods of regularisation from standards and quality control to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. added 2019-05-16
    Paper Four: How Should We Think About Resource Allocation?Bob Brecher - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (1):37-40.
    What is immediately striking about the general problem of how to allocate resources equitably is that although the task cannot be done, it nevertheless requires to be done. Imperfection is the most we can hope for. But of course some instances of imperfection are considerably worse than others: and those evidenced in all too much of the thinking of medical specialists, whether in the current discussion concerning cancer care or, for instance, by those involved in the management of kidney transplants (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. added 2019-05-15
    Justice and the Ada: Does Prioritizing and Rationing Health Care Discriminate Against the Disabled?Dan W. Brock - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):159-185.
    It is sometimes said that a society should be judged ethically by how it treats its least-fortunate or worst-off members. In one interpretation this is not a point about justice, but instead about moral virtues such as compassion and charity. In our response to the least fortunate among us, we display, or show that we lack, fundamental moral virtues of fellow feeling and concern for others in need. In a different interpretation, however, this point is about justice and a just (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36. added 2019-04-25
    Will More Organs Save More Lives? Cost‐Effectiveness and the Ethics of Expanding Organ Procurement.Govind Persad - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):684-690.
    The assumption that procuring more organs will save more lives has inspired increasingly forceful calls to increase organ procurement. This project, in contrast, directly questions the premise that more organ transplantation means more lives saved. Its argument begins with the fact that resources are limited and medical procedures have opportunity costs. Because many other lifesaving interventions are more cost‐effective than transplantation and compete with transplantation for a limited budget, spending on organ transplantation consumes resources that could have been used to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2019-04-04
    Evaluating the Legality of Age-Based Criteria in Health Care: From Nondiscrimination and Discretion to Distributive Justice.Govind Persad - 2019 - Boston College Law Review 60 (3):889-949.
    Recent disputes over whether older people should pay more for health insurance, or receive lower priority for transplantable organs, highlight broader disagreements regarding the legality of using age-based criteria in health care. These debates will likely intensify given the changing age structure of the American population and the turmoil surrounding the financing of American health care. This Article provides a comprehensive examination of the legality and normative desirability of age-based criteria. I defend a distributive justice approach to age-based criteria and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. added 2019-03-18
    Rawlsian Justice and the Social Determinants of Health.Jayna Fishman & Douglas MacKay - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (4):608-625.
    In this article, we suggest that the evidence regarding the social determinants of health calls for a deep re‐thinking of our understanding of distributive justice. Focusing on John Rawls's theory of distributive justice in particular, we argue that a full reckoning with the social determinants of health requires a re‐working of Rawls's principles of justice. We argue first that the social bases of health – a Rawlsian conception of the social determinants of health – should be considered a social primary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2019-03-18
    Justice and Fairness: A Critical Element in U.S. Health System Reform.Paul T. Menzel - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):582-597.
    The case for U.S. health system reform aimed at achieving wider insurance coverage in the population and disciplining the growth of costs is fundamentally a moral case, grounded in two principles: (1) a principle of social justice, the Just Sharing of the costs of illness, and (2) a related principle of fairness, the Prevention of Free‐Riding. These principles generate an argument for universal access to basic care when applied to two existing facts: the phenomenon of “market failure” in health insurance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. added 2019-03-18
    International Health Inequalities and Global Justice: Toward a Middle Ground.N. Daniels, S. Benatar & G. Brock - 2011 - In S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.), Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 97--107.
    Disturbing international inequalities in health abound. Life expectancy in Swaziland is half that in Japan. A child unfortunate enough to be born in Angola has 73 times as great a chance of dying before age 5 as a child born in Norway. A mother giving birth in southern sub-Saharan Africa has 100 times as great a chance of dying from her labor as one birthing in an industrialized country. For every mile one travels outward toward the Maryland suburbs from downtown (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. added 2019-03-18
    Justice and Global Health.Christopher Lowry & Udo Schüklenk - 2009 - In John-Stewart Gordon (ed.), Morality and Justice: Reading Boylan's a Just Society. Lexington Books. pp. 161-177.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. added 2019-03-18
    Justice and Health Care Systems: What Would an Ideal Health Care System Look Like?Erich H. Loewy - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):185-192.
    An ‘ideal’ health care system would be unencumbered by economic considerations and provide an ample supply of well-paid health care professionals who would supply culturally appropriate optimal health care to the level desired by patients. An ‘ideal’ health care system presupposes an ‘ideal’ society in which resources for all social goods are unlimited. Changes within health care systems occur both because of changes within the system and because of changes or demands in and by the ‘exterior environment’. Social systems must (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. added 2019-03-11
    Transparency Trade-Offs: Priority Setting, Scarcity, and Health Fairness.Govind Persad - 2019 - In I. Glenn Cohen, Barbara Evans, Holly Lynch & Carmel Shachar (eds.), Transparency in Health and Health Care. New York: Cambridge UP.
    This chapter argues that rather than viewing transparency as a right, we should regard it as a finite resource whose allocation involves tradeoffs. It then argues that those tradeoffs should be resolved by using a multi-principle approach to distributive justice. The relevant principles include maximizing welfare, maximizing autonomy, and giving priority to the worst off. Finally, it examines some of the implications for law of recognizing the tradeoffs presented by transparency proposals.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. added 2019-03-11
    Distributive Justice and Priority Setting in Health Care.Yolonda Y. Wilson - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (3):53-54.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. added 2019-03-11
    Health-Care and Distributive Justice: A Jurisprudential Account of Health-Care Distribution.Roger Paul Worthington - 2001 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
    This work critically examines the philosophical basis underlying methods of health-care distribution. It advocates taking an inclusive view in which access, availability, uptake, and quality all form part of the process of evaluation. Different methods of health-care organization are considered and I examine models for distributing health-care, specifically in the US, UK, and Australia. Concerns are addressed in terms of how systems are evaluated, as well as meanings attached to key terms such as equity and equality. Meeting the health-care needs (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. added 2019-03-11
    Theories of Justice in Health Care: Philosophical and Legal Issues.Glyn Lance Hotz - 1998 - Dissertation, York University (Canada)
    In extending the entitlement theory to health care, I will lay the groundwork for a scheme which takes into account historical entitlement, preserves patient and physician autonomy, and conceives health care on the maximum possible level. The entire health care delivery system will be governed by the crucial point for the entitlement theorist, that the appropriation of an unowned object not worsen the situation of others. The constraint is absolute. Any violation of the constraint calls for a halt to the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. added 2019-03-11
    Aristotelian Justice and Health Policy: Capability and Incompletely Theorized Agreements.Jennifer Prah Ruger - 1998 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    The dissertation Aristotelian Justice and Health Policy: Capability and Incompletely Theorized Agreements , Jerry Green, and Joseph Newhouse) focuses on the implications for health policy of Aristotelian/Capability lines of reasoning to social justice and efficiency. The monograph draws on philosophical and economic analysis and social choice theory in the examination of health capabilities as: a central focal variable for the assessment of equality and efficiency in health policy; the product of health and other public policies; and the object of social (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48. added 2019-03-11
    Health Care Justice and Rawls' Theory.Michael David Swenson - 1988 - Dissertation, University of Minnesota
    This dissertation is a study of issues of justice that arise in the practice of health care and an examination of the potential contributions that John Rawls' theory can yield towards a resolution of those issues. The primary goal is to define and defend a perspective from which individual health care practitioners can address problems of justice in health care. The dissertation begins with a discussion of the concept of justice, including the circumstances under which questions of justice arise, and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. added 2019-03-11
    John Rawls, Social Justice, and Health-Care Delivery Systems.Margaret Irene Lovell - 1985 - Dissertation, The University of Tennessee
    John Rawls' theory of justice holds special appeal for those who wish to apply a deontological moral theory to issues in medical ethics. This study is undertaken to examine Rawls' theory to see if it is, in fact, a worthwhile evaluative tool in judging the justice of social issues in medicine. ;In the first three chapters, issues are clarified and Rawls' theory is analyzed. The conclusion is that an unmodified Rawlsian theory is not applicable to distributive issues in medicine like (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. added 2019-02-11
    Applied Ethics in Mental Health in Cuba: Part II-Power Differentials, Dilemmas, Resources, and Limitations.Richard Walsh-Bowers, Amy Rossiter, Laura Sánchez Valdés & Isaac Prilleltensky - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):243-260.
    This article is the second one in a series dealing with mental health ethics in Cuba. It reports on ethical dilemmas, resources and limitations to their resolution, and recommendations for action. The data, obtained through individual interviews and focus groups with 28 professionals, indicate that Cubans experience dilemmas related to the interests of clients, their personal interests, and the interest of the state. These conflicts are related to power differentials among clients and professionals, professionals from various disciplines, and professionals and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 423