Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

Edited by Margaret Cameron (University of Melbourne)
Assistant editors: Donald Collins, Andrew Park
62 found
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1 — 50 / 62
  1. added 2020-02-23
    Parts of Ockham’s Razor and Their Counterparts.Ghislain Guigon - manuscript
    William of Ockham seems to have endorsed the view (i) that a whole is its parts, (ii) that some things are such that whether they together compose a whole is contingent, and (iii) that parts are ontologically prior to the whole they compose. Ockhamist Composition as Identity is the conjunction of these three claims. It seems doubly absurd since Leibniz’s Law arguments can be run against both the conjunction of (i) and (ii) and that of (i) and (iii). In this (...)
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  2. added 2020-02-20
    Franz Brentano, la escolástica y el tomismo.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2020 - In Manuel Lázaro Pulido, Francisco León Florido & Vicente Llamas Roig (eds.), Pensar la Edad Media cristiana: espacios de la filosofía medieval —Córdoba, Toledo, París—. Madrid: UNED/Synderesis. pp. 261-293.
    In this article, the author explores how Scholasticism could contribute to Brentano's conception about the relationship between faith and reason. It also shows that Brentano partially misunderstood Aquinas' notion of such relationship. In any case, the specific German Neo-Scholasticism known by Brentano in his youth was not an obstacle to develop a free way of thinking but, on the contrary, it could help him to do it.
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  3. added 2020-02-20
    Perceiving As: Non-Conceptual Forms of Perception in Medieval Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2020 - In Elena Baltuta (ed.), Medieval Perceptual Puzzles: Theories of Sense Perception in 13th and 14th Centuries. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 10–37.
    The aim of this chapter is to take a closer look at medieval discussions concerning the phenomenon of ‘perceiving as,’ and the psychological mechanisms that lie behind it. In contemporary philosophical literature this notion is usually used to refer to conceptual aspects of perception. For instance, when I perceive a black birdlike shape as a crow, I may be said to perceive the particular sensible thing x as an instance of a universal crowness φ, that is, as belonging to a (...)
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  4. added 2020-02-20
    La providencia en santo Tomás de Aquino.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2019 - Revista Española de Teología 79:419-454.
    According to Aquinas, divine omniscience, omnipotence and providence, do not contradict the existence of either true contingency in the natural world or freedom but, on the contrary, they support them. In short, the two peculiarities of the doctrine of providence in St. Thomas here exposed are: first, that God's will is the ultimate foundation of all contingency (and not merely the deficiency of secondary causes); second, that the divine causality cannot be reduced to any of the two groups of created (...)
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  5. added 2020-02-18
    Between Discipline and Doctrine.David G. Hunter - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):3-22.
    This article explores a possible tension in Augustine’s thought between his response to the misconduct of clergy, which stressed swift discipline, and his anti-Donatist theology of sacraments, which emphasized the efficacy of sacraments apart from the moral worthiness of the clergy. I identify five principles that Augustine followed in his handling of clerical misconduct: 1) Decisive action that usually resulted in removal of the offenders from ministry; 2) concern for the rights of the victim over clerical privilege; 3) a just (...)
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  6. added 2020-02-18
    Anthony Dupont, Shari Boodts, Gert Partoens, and Johan Leemans, Eds. Preaching in the Patristic Era: Sermons, Preachers, and Audiences in the Latin West. [REVIEW]Jonathan D. Teubner - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):124-128.
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  7. added 2020-02-18
    Craig Allert, Early Christian Readings of Genesis One: Patristic Exegesis and Literal Interpretation. [REVIEW]Paul M. Blowers - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):101-103.
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  8. added 2020-02-18
    Stefana Dan Laing, Retrieving History: Memory and Identity Formation in the Early Church. [REVIEW]Collin Garbarino - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):141-143.
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  9. added 2020-02-18
    Jaime García Álvarez, OSA, Une Seule 'Me Et Un Seul Cœur En Dieu. Vivre En Communauté À la Lumière de Saint Augustin. [REVIEW]Jérôme Lagouanère - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):107-110.
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  10. added 2020-02-18
    Augustine, Confessions. Translated, with Introduction and Notes by Thomas Williams. [REVIEW]Toni Alimi - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):104-106.
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  11. added 2020-02-18
    De Genesi Aduersus Manicheos.Thomas Clemmons - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):47-78.
    This article examines Augustine’s early anthropology, particularly through De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos. The most thorough treatment of this topic is found in the enduring work of Robert J. O’Connell, SJ. O’Connell argues that Augustine drew directly from the Enneads in De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos to formulate his anthropology. This article evaluates and critiques the evidence and implications of O’Connell’s position concerning Augustine’s articulation of the “fall of the soul.” I argue that an attentive text-based reading of De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos (...)
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  12. added 2020-02-18
    Jonathan D. Teubner, Prayer After Augustine: A Study in the Development of the Latin Tradition. [REVIEW]John Peter Kenney - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):144-148.
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  13. added 2020-02-18
    A. Zumkeller, Das Mönchtum des Heiligen Augustinus. [REVIEW]Frederick Van Fleteren - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):149-151.
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  14. added 2020-02-18
    Ali Bonner, The Myth of Pelagianism. [REVIEW]Andrew C. Chronister - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):115-119.
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  15. added 2020-02-18
    Elizabeth A. Clark, The Fathers Refounded: Protestant Liberalism, Roman Catholic Modernism, and the Teaching of Ancient Christianity in Early Twentieth-Century America. [REVIEW]David A. Hollinger - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):120-123.
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  16. added 2020-02-18
    Douglas Finn, Life in the Spirit: Trinitarian Grammar and Pneumatic Community in Hegel and Augustine. [REVIEW]Thomas McNulty - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):129-136.
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  17. added 2020-02-18
    Augustine, De Civitate Dei: The City of God, Books XIII & XIV; Augustine, De Civitate Dei: The City of God, Books XV & XVI. Edited with an Introduction and Commentary by P. G. Walsh. [REVIEW]Miles Beckwith - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):111-114.
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  18. added 2020-02-18
    Boniface I, Augustine, and the Translation of Honorius to Caesarea Mauretaniae.Geoffrey D. Dunn - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):23-46.
    Augustine’s Epistulae 23A*, 23*, and 22*, written in late 419 and early 420, present his involvement in the dispute concerning the translation of Honorius to Caesarea Mauretaniae, a city Augustine had visited in September 418 while fulfilling a commission from Zosimus of Rome. The translation of bishops from one church to another had been condemned by the 325 Council of Nicaea. The three letters are difficult to interpret because the information to his three correspondents seems to differ. A careful reading (...)
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  19. added 2020-02-18
    Michael P. Foley, Translation and Commentary, On the Happy Life. [REVIEW]Erik Kenyon - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):137-140.
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  20. added 2020-02-18
    The Challenge of Augustine’s Epistula 151.Doug Clapp - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (1):79-98.
    Epistula 151 shows Augustine trying to exert pressure on a high-ranking imperial official from his position outside of the senatorial elite. The aristocrat Caecilianus had written a letter, now lost, chastising Augustine for his lack of correspondence. Augustine’s reply begins and ends according to typical epistolary conventions. The heart of the letter, however, narrates Augustine’s harrowing experience of the arrest and execution of the brothers Marcellinus and Apringius by the imperial commander Marinus. The profound spiritual contrast between villain and victims (...)
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  21. added 2020-02-18
    Dvojí pohled na Tomášův traktát o Trojici.Prokop Sousedík - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (5):79-108.
    The author shows that Aquinas’s treatise on the Trinity can be viewed in two ways. According to the first, now prevailing opinion, the thoughts of the Angelic Doctor are too speculative and in essence they harm our personal relationship with God. He aims to show that the main source of inspiration for this approach are those currents in modern and contemporary philosophy according to which any metaphysics is impossible. Adherents of the other view do not reject metaphysics, and so they (...)
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  22. added 2020-02-02
    History and Religion as Sources of Hellenic Identity in Late Byzantium and the Post-Byzantine Era.Georgios Steiris - 2020 - Genealogy 4 (1):1-16.
    Recently, seminal publications highlighted the Romanitas of the Byzantines. However, it is not without importance that from the 12th century onwards the ethnonym Hellene (Ἓλλην) became progressively more popular. A number of influential intellectuals and political actors preferred the term Hellene to identify themselves, instead of the formal Roman (Ρωμαῖος) and the common Greek (Γραικός). While I do not intend to challenge the prevalence of the Romanitas during the long Byzantine era, I suggest that we should reevaluate the emerging importance (...)
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  23. added 2020-01-24
    Intuitive Knowledge in Ibn Sīnā: Its Distinctive Features and Prerequisites.Syamsuddin Arif - 2002 - Al-Shajarah 7 (2):213-251.
    Intuition (hads) as a function of 'aql, fitrah and khirad, according to Ibn Sina, not only constitutes the basis of all learning, and hence a way for arriving independently at new knowledge, but serves as means for verifying what has been studied and learned from others, representing direct insight into the true nature of reality as a coherent whole. Some questions remain, however, as to what distinguishes intuition from other kinds of cognition and what is so special about intuitive knowledge (...)
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  24. added 2020-01-18
    Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology.Scott M. Williams (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford: Routledge.
    This book uses the tools of analytic philosophy of disability (and Disability Studies more generally) and close readings of medieval Christian philosophical and theological texts in order to survey what these thinkers said about what today we call “disability.” The chapters also compare what these medieval authors say with modern and contemporary philosophers and theologians of disability. This dual approach enriches our understanding of the history of disability in medieval Christian philosophy and theology and opens up new avenues of research (...)
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  25. added 2020-01-18
    Disability, Ableism and Anti-Ableism in Medieval Latin Philosophy and Theology.Scott M. Williams - forthcoming - In Andrew LaZella & Richard A. Lee Jr (eds.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Middle Ages and Renaissance Philosophy. Edinburgh University Press.
  26. added 2020-01-18
    Personhood, Ethics, and Disability: A Comparison of Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern Concepts of Personhood.Scott M. Williams - forthcoming - In Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 80-108.
    This chapter compares three different general accounts of personhood (Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern) and argues that if personhood is the basis on which one has equal moral status in the moral community and the disability-positive position is correct, then the Byzantine and Boethian accounts are preferable over the Modern accounts that are surveyed here. It further argues that the Byzantine account is even friendlier to a disability-positive position compared to the Boethian account.
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  27. added 2020-01-17
    Divine Emanation as Cosmic Origin: Ibn Sīnā and His Critics.Syamsuddin Arif - 2012 - TSAQAFAH - Journal of Islamic Thought and Civilization 8 (2):331-346.
    The question of cosmic beginning has always attracted considerable attention from serious thinkers past and present. Among many contesting theories that have emerged, that of emanation was appropriated by Muslim philosophers like Ibn Sînâ in order to reconcile the Aristotelian doctrine of the eternity of matter with the teaching of al-Qur’ân on the One Creator-God. According to this theory, the universe, which comprises a multitude of entities, is generated from a transcendent Being, the One, that is unitary, through the medium (...)
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  28. added 2020-01-17
    The Universe as a System: Ibn Sīnā’s Cosmology Revisited.Syamsuddin Arif - 2012 - In Muzaffar Iqbal (ed.), New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science - Volume 3. Surrey, UK: Ashgate. pp. 54-71.
    This article explores Ibn Sīnā’s cosmological views and analyzes the underlying assumptions and arguments in support of the theories to which he subscribes. These include the notions of the central and stationary position of the earth in a finite, spherical cosmos, the impossibility of the existence of many universes, and the metaphysical forces that drive, guide, and maintain the perpetual movement of cosmic bodies.
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  29. added 2020-01-17
    Causality in Islamic Philosophy: The Arguments of Ibn Sīnā.Syamsuddin Arif - 2012 - In Muzaffar Iqbal (ed.), New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science - Volume 3. Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing Ltd. pp. 299-316.
    This article is intended to provide insight into aspects of Ibn Sīnā’s natural philosophy. It will summarize his interpretation of the Aristotelian four causes, explicate his theory of efficient and necessary causal linkage, and analyze his arguments for causal efficacy. Finally, it will discuss Ibn Sīnā’s views on chance happenings in nature.
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  30. added 2020-01-17
    Ibn Sina's Idea of Nature and Change.Syamsuddin Arif - 2007 - AFKAR - Journal of Aqidah and Islamic Thought 8 (1):111-139.
    This article discusses Ibn Sina's idea of 'nature' and his theory of change, including that of substantial change, in comparison with the views held by Aristotle and some Pre-socratic philosophers.
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  31. added 2020-01-10
    Aristotle and Hume on the Idea of Natural Necessity.David Botting - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):153-227.
    There is a tension in scholarship about Aristotle’s philosophy, especially his philosophy of science, between empiricist readings and rationalist readings. A prime site of conflict is Posterior Analytics II.19 where Aristotle, after having said that we know the first principles by induction suddenly says that we know them by nous. Those taking the rationalist side find in nous something like a faculty of “intuition” and are led to the conclusion that by “induction” Aristotle has some kind of idea of “intuitive (...)
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  32. added 2020-01-10
    Christopher Byrne: Aristotle’s Science of Matter and Motion.Jiayu Zhang - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):331-334.
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  33. added 2020-01-10
    Duns Scotus on the Nature of Justice.T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):275-305.
    Duns Scotus has a remarkably unique and comprehensive theory concerning the nature of justice. Alas, commentators on his work have yet to full flesh out the details. Here, we begin the process of doing so, focusing primarily on his metaethical views on justice, i.e., what justice is or amounts to. While Scotus’s most detailed account of justice can be found in his Ordinatio, we find further specifics emerging in a number of other contexts and works. We argue that Scotus offers (...)
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  34. added 2020-01-10
    Reply to Jiayu Zhang.Christopher Byrne - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):335-336.
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  35. added 2020-01-10
    Leibniz on Spontaneity, The Eduction of Substantial Forms, and Creaturely Interaction: A Tension.Davis Kuykendall - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):229-274.
    Leibniz argued that (i) substantial forms only begin to exist via Divine creation; (ii) created substances cannot transeuntly cause accidents in distinct substances; and yet (iii) created substances immanently produce their accidents. Some of Leibniz’s support for (i) came from his endorsement of a widely-made argument against the eduction of substantial forms. However, in defense of eduction, Suárez argued that if creatures cannot produce substantial forms, they also cannot produce accidents, threatening the consistency of (i) and (iii). In this paper, (...)
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  36. added 2020-01-10
    The Emergence of Formalism and a New Conception of Science.David Svoboda & Prokop Sousedík - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):307-329.
    According to formalism, a mathematician is not concerned with mysterious metaphysical entities but with mathematical symbols. As a result, mathematical entities become simply sensible signs. However, the price that has to be paid for this move seems to be too high, for mathematics, at present considered to be the queen of sciences, turns out to be a to a contentless game. That is why it seems absurd to regard numbers and all mathematical entities as mere symbols. The aim of our (...)
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  37. added 2020-01-09
    God in Himself: Scripture, Metaphysics, and the Task of Christian Theology.Steven J. Duby - 2019 - InterVarsity Press.
    How do we know God? Can we know God as he is in himself? These longstanding questions have been addressed by Christian theologians throughout the church's history. Some, such as Thomas Aquinas, have argued that we know God through both natural and supernatural revelation, while others, especially Karl Barth, have argued that we know God only on the basis of the incarnation. Contemporary discussions of these issues sometimes give the impression that we have to choose between a speculative doctrine of (...)
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  38. added 2020-01-08
    Ockham on Divine Concurrence.Zita Toth - 2019 - Saint Anselm Journal 15:81-105.
    The focus of this paper is Ockham's stance on the question of divine concurrence---the question whether God is causally active in the causal happenings of the created world, and if so, what God's causal activity amounts to and what place that leaves for created causes. After discussing some preliminaries, I turn to presenting what I take to be Ockham's account. As I show, Ockham, at least in this issue, is rather conservative: he agrees with the majority of medieval thinkers (including (...)
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  39. added 2020-01-08
    Peter of Palude on Divine Concurrence: An Edition of His In II Sent., D. 1, Q. 4.Zita Toth - 2016 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 83 (1):49-92.
    The present text contains a critical edition of Peter of Palude’s question of divine concurrence, found in his Sentences commentary, book II, d. 1, q. 4. The question concerns whether God is immediately active in every action of a creature, and if yes, how we should understand this divine concurrence. Peter, just as elsewhere in his commentary, considers at length the opinions of other thinkers — especially those of Giles of Rome, Durand of St.-Pourçain, and Thomas Aquinas — and develops (...)
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  40. added 2020-01-07
    Santo Tomás como exégeta bíblico en su Comentario al Evangelio de san Juan.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2019 - Fortvnatae 30:225-256.
    This article intends to offer a general presentation of the way in which Saint Thomas Aquinas proceeded in his exegesis of sacred texts. The author concentrates on one of Aquinas’ most estimated biblical commentaries, his Lectura on the Gospel according to St. John. Aquinas combines great theological insight with an incipient development of some literary techniques. In his hermeneutics, he emphasizes the priority of the literal sense of Scripture, although this thesis does not lead him to present a purely natural (...)
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  41. added 2020-01-06
    The Book of the City of Ladies.Christine De Pizan - 2000 - Penguin Classics.
    Christine de Pisan (circa 1364–1430) was born in Italy and came to France at the age of four with her father. Arguably the first woman in Europe to earn a living as an author, she is widely regarded as an early feminist who spoke out for the rights of women and espoused female achievement. She wrote poems and prose texts that were often allegorical and philosophical and that reflected her own original and engaged personality. She prepared the books with the (...)
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  42. added 2019-12-26
    How Mind, Logic and Language, Have Evolved From Medieval Philosophy to Early Modern Philosophy? A Critical Study.Mudasir A. Tantray - 2018 - World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 4 (5):222-229.
    This paper determines the state of mind, logic and language in medieval philosophy. It also exhibits the journey from medieval to early modern philosophy. In medieval philosophy, concept of mind was intimately connected soul or spirit with its harmony with religious tradition. Logic and language as well were corresponding with religion and faith. However in early modern philosophy the schema of mind, logic and language were different. These concepts were bailed from the clutches of religious dogmatism and faith towards the (...)
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  43. added 2019-12-20
    Mental Language in Aquinas?Joshua Hochschild - 2015 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. New York: Fordham University. pp. 29-45.
    Ockham is usually considered the first to hold a proper theory of mental language, but Aquinas is willing to call the concept, or the act of intellect by which something is understood, a verbum mentis or “mental word.” This essay explores the sense in which Aquinas regarded concepts as language-like. It argues that Aquinas's understanding of concepts and their objects meant that his application of syntactic and semantic analysis to them did not and could not lead in the direction of (...)
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  44. added 2019-12-20
    Substance Made Manifest: Metaphysical and Semantic Implications of the Doctrine of Transubstantiation.Joshua Hochschild - 2014 - Saint Anselm Journal 9 (2).
    Argues that traditional Catholic understanding of transubstantiation is obscured by modern metaphysics' neglect of the category of substance, and by modern semantic assumptions about how words signify.
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  45. added 2019-12-20
    Proportionality and Divine Naming: Did St. Thomas Change His Mind About Analogy?Joshua Hochschild - 2013 - The Thomist 77 (4):531-558.
    The common view that Aquinas changed his mind about analogy (before and after De Veritate 2.11) is unwarranted. Dialectical context, and clarifications about the logic of analogy and the implications of proportionality, reveal consistency in Aquinas's teaching on the analogy of divine names.
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  46. added 2019-12-20
    Form, Essence, Soul: Distinguishing Principles of Thomistic Metaphysics.Joshua Hochschild - 2013 - In Nikolaj Zunic (ed.), Distinctions of Being: Philosophical Approaches to Reality. Washington, DC, USA: American Maritain Association. pp. 21-35.
    In a living body, the substantial form, the essence, and the soul play very similar, but non-identical, metaphysical roles. This article explores the similarities and differences to clarify basic points of Thomistic metaphysics.
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  47. added 2019-12-20
    Cajetan on Scotus on Univocity.Joshua Hochschild - 2007 - Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics 7:32-42.
    What role does Scotus‘s understanding of univocity play in Cajetan‘s development of a theory of analogy? In this paper I examine three relevant texts from Cajetan (question 3 of his commentary on Aquinas‘s De Ente et Essentia, his treatise De Nominum Analogia, and his commentary on question 13, article 5 of Aquinas‘s Summa Theologiae) in which Cajetan articulates his understanding of analogy at least in part through dialectical engagement with Scotus‘s arguments about univocity.
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  48. added 2019-12-17
    Pseudo-Dionysius and the Importance of Sensible Things.Filip Ivanovic - 2020 - In Francesca Dell’Acqua & Ernesto Sergio Mainoldi (eds.), Pseudo-Dionysius and Christian Visual Culture, c.500–900. London, UK: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 77-87.
    Dionysius claims that the divine attributes ‘can be fashioned from material things to symbolise what is intelligible and intellectual’. As a matter of fact, sense perceptions are ‘echoes of wisdom’, because they manifest the intelligible. God’s majesty is intermingled in sensible things, which help the human mind to ascend to the ineffable divinity. Thus, sensible things are a concession to human nature, and serve as the mind’s vehicle in its ascent to God. Dionysius constructs an aesthetic soteriology, which centres around (...)
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  49. added 2019-12-16
    Guide de lecture du Commentaire du Traité de l'Interprétation d'Aristote par Thomas d'Aquin.Guy-François Delaporte (ed.) - 2017 - Paris France: L'Harmattan.
    « En écrivant son Traité de l’Interprétation, Aristote a trempé sa plume à l’encre de son esprit ! » L’antique remarque de Cassiodore vaut encore aujourd’hui tant la matière étudiée est complexe et le style ramassé. Aristote démonte les mécanismes du langage philosophique, aux confins de la linguistique et de la métaphysique. Il offre à cette occasion des développements fondateurs sur la formulation de la vérité, les règles de mise en contradiction, les propositions universelles, la contingence des jugements sur le (...)
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  50. added 2019-12-16
    Guide de lecture du Commentaire des Seconds Analytique d'Aristote par Thomas d'Aquin.Guy-François Delaporte - 2015 - Paris: L'Harmattan.
    Avec son traité de la démonstration intitulé Seconds Analytiques, c’est un véritable discours de la méthode qu’Aristote nous livre. L’auteur parvient au sommet de l’art logique dont il est l’inventeur. Pourtant, de l’avis unanime des interprètes anciens et actuels, nous sommes devant un de ses écrits les plus difficiles à comprendre. C’est pourquoi Thomas d’Aquin a voulu commenter minutieusement ce texte dont il juge la maîtrise essentielle au travail intellectuel. Tous ses écrits, tant philosophiques que théologiques sont, en effet, construits (...)
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