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  1. The Distinction Between Physics and Metaphysics in Maimonides's Guide of the Perplexed.Madeea Axinciuc - 2003 - Chôra 1:173-185.
  2. The Distinction Between Physics and Metaphysics in Maimonides's Guide of the Perplexed.Madeea Axinciuc - 2003 - Chôra 1:173-185.
  3. From Sorcery to Witchcraft: Clerical Conceptions of Magic in the Later Middle Ages.Michael D. Bailey - 2001 - Speculum 76 (4):960-990.
  4. Nature and Motion in the Middle Ages.Steven Baldner - 1988 - New Scholasticism 62 (4):479-483.
  5. Expertus Sum: L'Expérience Par les Sens Dans la Philosophie Naturelle Médiévale: Actes du Colloque International de Pont-à-Mousson, 5-7 Février 2009.Thomas Bénatouïl & Isabelle Draelants (eds.) - 2011 - Sismel Edizioni Del Galluzzo.
    Proceedings of a Conference on experience in Medieval natural philosophy.
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  6. Saint Augustine, His Philosophy.Joseph P. Boland - 1931 - Modern Schoolman 9 (1):17-17.
  7. The Moral Psychology of Duns Scotus: Some Preliminary Questions.John Boler - 1990 - Franciscan Studies 50 (1):31-56.
  8. Knowledge of the Extramental World in the System of Tommaso Campanella.Bernardino M. Bonansea - 1957 - Franciscan Studies 17 (2-3):188-212.
  9. Campanella as Forerunner of Descartes.Bernardino M. Bonansea - 1956 - Franciscan Studies 16 (1-2):37-59.
  10. A Note on an Unknown Manuscript Bearing Upon Marsilius of Inghen's Philosophy of Nature.E. P. Bos - 1979 - Vivarium 17 (1):61-68.
  11. The Discursive Power: Sources and Doctrine of the Vis Cogitativa According to St. Thomas Aquinas By George P. Klubertanz, S. J. [REVIEW]Ignatius Brady - 1953 - Franciscan Studies 13 (4):133-136.
  12. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nature Ed. By R. A. Kocourek.Ignatius Brady - 1952 - Franciscan Studies 12 (2):234-234.
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  13. St. Thomas Aquinas On Kingship to the King of Cyprus by Gerald B. Phelan.Ignatius Brady - 1950 - Franciscan Studies 10 (3):313-313.
  14. Instantaneous Change and the Physics of Sanctification: "Quasi-Aristotelianism" in Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet XV Q. 13.Susan Brower-Toland - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):19-46.
    In Quodlibet XV q.13, Henry of Ghent considers whether the Virgin Mary was immaculately conceived. He argues that she was not, but rather possessed sin only at the first instant of her existence. Because Henry’s defense of this position involves an elaborate discussion of motion and mutation, his discussion marks an important contribution to medieval discussions of Aristotelian natural philosophy. In fact, a number of scholars have identified Henry’s discussion as the source of an unusual fourteenth-century theory of change referred (...)
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  15. Bonaventure on the Impossibility of a Beginningless World.Benjamin Brown - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):389-409.
    Th is paper examines St. Bonaventure’s arguments for the impossibility of a beginningless world, taking into consideration their historical background and context. His argument for the impossibility of traversing the infinite is explored at greater length, taking into account the classic objection to this argument. It is argued that Bonaventure understood the issues at hand quite well and that histraversal argument is valid. Because of the nature of an actually infinite multitude, the difference between the infinite by division and the (...)
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  16. Pluralism and Material Substance: Thomas Aquinas and the Problem of Material Constitution.Christopher Mark Brown - 2002 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    A number of contemporary philosophers argue that puzzles about material objects such as the Ship of Theseus show that our common-sense intuitions about compound material objects are logically incompatible with one another. This "problem of material constitution" thus suggests that common sense and logic are at odds where the nature of material objects is concerned. Most contemporary philosophers solve the PMC by defending the denial of a common-sense intuition about material objects, although there is no consensus on just which intuition (...)
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  17. Sound and its Perception in the Middle Ages.Charles Burnett - 1991 - In Charles Burnett, Michael Fend & Penelope Gouk (eds.), The Second Sense. Warburg Institute. pp. 43--70.
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  18. The Ages of Man a Study in Medieval Writing and Thought.J. A. Burrow - 1986
  19. Ioannis Duns Scoti Doctrina de Scientifica Theologiae Natura by Aegidius Magrini, O. F. M.E. M. Buytaert - 1954 - Franciscan Studies 14 (2):215-216.
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  20. The Ages of Man: Medieval Interpretations of the Life CycleElizabeth Sears.Joan Cadden - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):629-630.
  21. A Matter of Life and Death: Water in the Natural Philosophy of Albertus Magnus.Joan Cadden - 1980 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 2 (2):241 - 252.
  22. Medieval Latin Scientific Writings in the Barberini Collection. A Provisional CatalogueTheodore Silverstein.Francis J. Carmody - 1958 - Speculum 33 (4):564-565.
  23. Quia Inter Doctores Est Magna Dissensio: Les Débats de Philosophie Naturelle à Paris au 14. Siècle.Stefano Caroti & J. Celeyrette (eds.) - 2004 - L. S. Olschki.
  24. Metaphysics, Embryology, and Medieval Aristotelianism.William Carroll - 1990 - Lyceum 3:1-14.
  25. Conclusion: D’Aristote À Averroès. La Théorie de la Génération au Cœur du Néo-Aristotélisme.Cristina Cerami - 2015 - In Génération Et Substance: Aristote Et Averroès Entre Physique Et Métaphysique. De Gruyter. pp. 672-676.
  26. The Natural and the Supernatural in the Middle Ages.Stuart Clark - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (2):290-290.
  27. Animals in Art and Thought to the End of the Middle Ages. Clarke - 1973 - International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (1):153-154.
  28. The Ages of Man: Medieval Interpretations of the Life CycleElizabeth Sears.Marcia L. Colish - 1988 - Speculum 63 (2):474-476.
  29. The Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological Vision.Richard Cross - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    Duns Scotus, along with Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham, was one of the three most talented and influential of the medieval schoolmen, and a highly original thinker. This book examines the central concepts in his physics, including matter, space, time, and unity.
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  30. Richard Rufus of Cornwall In Physicam Aristotelis.O. David Flood - 2005 - Franciscan Studies 63:531-533.
  31. Was Peter of Abano the Translator of Pseudo-Aristotle’s Problemata Physica?Pieter de Leemans - 2007 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 49:103-118.
  32. Medieval Latin Commentaries on Aristotle's «De Motu Animalium».Pieter de Leemans - 2000 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 67 (2):272-360.
    Medieval commentaries on Aristotelian treatises illustrate how these texts were read, understood and interpreted by contemporary philosophers. About this, researchers generally agree. Anyone who wants to investigate the reception of Aristotelian thought in the Middle Ages, then, must consider not only the medieval translations of the Stagirite’s works but also the commentaries on his works. The acceptance of this statement, however, causes a heuristic problem: there exists a mass of such commentaries, written down in hundreds of manuscripts, conserved in as (...)
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  33. Quaestiones super De animalibus, Liber XV, Quaestiones 1-9; 11 / Über die Lebewesen, Buch XV, Probleme 1-9; 11.Albert derGrosse - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):145-185.
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  34. Review Article". The Text of John B. Friedman's Edition of John de Foxton's "Liber Cosmographiae.F. N. M. Diekstra - 1990 - Vivarium 28:55.
  35. Thomas Aquinas on Contingency in Nature: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism.Petr Dvořák - 2008 - Studia Neoaristotelica 5 (2):185-196.
    The paper deals with Aristotle’s argument against determinism and in favor of contingency in nature as interpreted by Thomas Aquinas. The case against determinism is based on the idea that there are properly uncaused accidental events in reality. This means that in case there is some coincidental future event e, one cannot trace an unbroken causal chain leading to e back to the present or the past. For a Christian Aristotelian, such as Aquinas, there arises a difficulty concerning divine foreknowledge (...)
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  36. A Note on an Unknown Manuscript Bearing Upon Marsilius of Inghen's Philosophy of Nature. E. Bos - 1979 - Vivarium 17 (1):61-68.
  37. On Dante, Hyperspheres, and the Curvature of the Medieval Cosmos.William Egginton - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (2):195-216.
  38. St. Thomas Aquinas's Commentary on Aristotle's Physics.Leo J. Elders - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (4):713-748.
    The Physics is a most remarkable work, and profoundly influenced Medieval Philosophers. Thomas Aquinas wrote a detailed, impressive commentary. This essay studies in particular the composition of the Physics as Thomas saw it, his thorough study of Aristotle’s way of arguing and the important distinction he made between disputative arguments, which are only partially true, and arguments which determine the truth. Aristotle frequently uses proofs which are wrong when one considers the proper nature of bodies, but possible considering their common (...)
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  39. Zeit, Zahl und Bild. Studien zur Verbindung von Philosophie und Wissenschaft bei Abbo von Fleury.Eva-Maria Engelen - 1993 - de Gruyter.
    In dieser Arbeit wird Abbo von Fleury für die Philosophie- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte neu erschlossen und gezeigt, inwiefern die Philosophie der Zeit Einfluss auf die Entwicklung der Wissenschaften dieser Epoche hatte und welche Rolle Bilder in dieser Wissenschaftsepoche für die Erkenntnis hatten.
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  40. Speculum Animae: Richard Rufus on Perception and Cognition.Matthew Etchemendy & Rega Wood - 2011 - Franciscan Studies 69 (1):53-115.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:“Garrulus sum et loquax et expedire nescio. Diu te tenui in istis, sed de cetero procedam.” These are the words of Richard Rufus of Cornwall, a thirteenth-century Scholastic and lecturer at the Universities of Paris and Oxford. Rufus is apologizing to his readers: “I am garrulous and loquacious, and I don’t know how to be efficient. I have detained you with these things a long while, but let me (...)
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  41. Tusi's Three Philosophical Questions ( Appendix: Arabic Text).Pirooz Fatoorchi - 2014 - International Journal of Shi'i Studies 9 (2):13-14.
  42. Conoscenza e Scienza in Landolfo Caracciolo.Francesco Fiorentino - 2013 - Franciscan Studies 71 (1):375-409.
    La vita e le opere di Landolfo Caracciolo O.F.M. sono state descritte in modo sistematico da Salerno.1 Rispetto a questa descrizione, che ha posto il bacellierato sentenziario di Caracciolo intorno al 1320, va assunta la ricostruzione di Schabel, che ha spiegato come Caracciolo abbia letto le Sententiae a Parigi dopo Pietro Aureolo e prima di Francesco d’Ascoli e Francesco di Meyronnes.2 Successivamente Landolfo avrebbe ricevuto la prima cattedra in teologia dello Studium fran-cescano di Napoli, inaugurandovi la tradizione scotista.3Landolfo fu ministro (...)
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  43. Richard Rufus of Cornwall In Aristotelis De generatione et corruptione (review).David Flood - 2011 - Franciscan Studies 69 (1):512-513.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:We have here the critical edition of Richard Rufus’s commentary on Aristotle’s treatment of generation and corruption. The Greek philosopher explained how living beings came about and passed on. His text was much studied by scholastics in the latter part of the thirteenth century. Rufus’s commentary is, as far as we know, “the earliest surviving commentary” on the text. Understandably it influenced succeeding commentaries. This edition has come about (...)
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  44. The Philosophy of Nature of St. Thomas Aquinas.David Ruel Foster - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):674-676.
  45. The Science of Conjecture.James Franklin - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):539-542.
  46. The Medieval Astrologization of Aristotle's Biology: Averroes on the Role of the Celestial Bodies in the Generation of Animate Beings.Gad Freudenthal - 2002 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (1):111-137.
    How do the variegated forms of sublunar substances (the elements, homoeomerous substances, plants, animals) arise in prime matter? Averroes throughout his life believed that “a principle from without” was involved, but changed his mind over its identity. While in an early period of his life he maintained that all forms emanate from the active intellect, he later discarded that metaphysical notion and sought to develop a more naturalistic, astrologically inspired account, which identified the heavenly bodies as the source of sublunar (...)
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  47. Courting Disaster: Astrology at the English Court and University in the Later Middle Ages.Hilary M. Carey.John B. Friedman - 1994 - Speculum 69 (4):1135-1138.
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  48. Two Astromagical Manuscripts of Alfonso X+ The Production of Works on Astronomy and Astral Magic in 13th-Century Castile.A. GarciaAviles - 1996 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 59:14-23.
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  49. Nature and Motion in the Middle Ages.Nadine F. George - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (1):145-146.
  50. Nature Study and the Interpretation of a Biblical Text, From the Physiologus to Albert the Great.Mia I. Gerhardt - 1965 - Vivarium 3 (1):1-23.
1 — 50 / 159