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  1. added 2019-01-10
    Book Review: Paul Stern, Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2018 - The Medieval Review 12 (6).
    A review of Paul Stern's Dante's Philosophical Life: Politics and Human Wisdom in Purgatorio (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018).
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  2. added 2019-01-10
    Book Review: Maria Luisa Ardizzone, Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante's Banquet. [REVIEW]Jason Aleksander - 2017 - Renaissance Quarterly 70 (4):1625.
    A review of Maria Luisa Ardizzone's Reading as the Angels Read: Speculation and Politics in Dante’s Banquet. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2016. xii 1 454 pp. $95.
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  3. added 2019-01-10
    Nicholas of Cusa.Jason Aleksander - 2016 - Oxford Bibliographies in Medieval Studies.
    Given the significance of Nicholas of Cusa’s ecclesiastical career, it is no surprise that a good deal of academic attention on Nicholas has focused on his role in the history of the church. Nevertheless, it would also be fair to say that a good deal of the attention that is focused on the life and thought of Nicholas of Cusa is the legacy of prior generations of scholars who saw in his theoretical work an opportunity to define the most salient (...)
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  4. added 2019-01-10
    Teaching the Divine Comedy's Understanding of Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2012 - Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture 13 (1):67-76.
    This essay discusses five main topoi in the Divine Comedy through which teachers might encourage students to explore the question of the Divine Comedy’s treatment of philosophy. These topoi are: (1) The Divine Comedy’s representations in Inferno of noble pagans who are allegorically or historically associated with philosophy or natural reason; (2) its treatment of the relationship between faith and reason and that relationship’s consequences for the text’s understanding of the respective authoritativeness of theology and philosophy; (3) representations in the (...)
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  5. added 2019-01-10
    Dante's Understanding of the Two Ends of Human Desire and the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology.Jason Aleksander - 2011 - Journal of Religion 91 (2):158-187.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how this understanding defines philosophy’s and theology’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. I show that, while Dante devalues the philosophical authority associated with the traditional Aristotelian emphasis on the significance of contemplative activity, he does so in order to highlight philosophy’s ethico-political authority to guide human conduct toward its “earthly beatitude.” Moreover, I argue that, although Dante subordinates earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude, he (...)
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  6. added 2018-09-18
    The Origin of Intelligibility According to Duns Scotus, William of Alnwick, and Petrus Thomae.Garrett Smith - 2014 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 81 (1):37-74.
    This study investigates a conflict in Duns Scotus ’ doctrine of the origin of intelligible being or intelligibility found in his various treatments of the divine ideas. Scotus holds both that the divine intellect produces the essences of creatable things, and that the essences of creatable things are contained in the divine essence and represented by it to the divine intellect. Although this conflict has escaped the notice of most of Scotus ’ medieval and modern interpreters, two early followers of (...)
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  7. added 2018-06-17
    Justifying Atonement: An Anselmian Response to Modern Critics.Daniel Shannon - 2009 - Saint Anselm Journal 6 (2):1 - 19.
    This paper considers three modern objections to Anselm’s argument on atonement in book I of ’Cur Deus Homo’. The objections are from Friedrich Nietzsche, R. C. Moberly, and Hastings Rashdall; each one makes the case that Anselm’s argument is fallacious. Each one interprets Anselm’s position as requiring that someone innocent suffer punishment in order to acquit guilt. I contend that these objectors do not offer a strong case against Anselm’s argument, principally because they have not examined it completely and have (...)
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  8. added 2018-06-13
    What Part of Fides Quaerens Don’T You Intellectum ? On the Persistent Philosophical Misunderstanding of Anselm’s Ontological Argument.Derek A. Michaud - manuscript
    A *very* rough draft of a paper on Anselm's "ontological argument" in which I argue that the argument in the Proslogion rests on a robust notion of having "that then which nothing greater can be thought" in one's mind.
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  9. added 2018-05-31
    Los capítulos I-IV del Monologion de san Anselmo de Canterbury como partes de una única vía argumentativa a posteriori para demostrar la existencia de Dios.Nicolás Olivares Bøgeskov - 2016 - Brasiliensis 5 (10):7-32.
    The article analyzes the a posteriori argumentation for the existence of God present in saint Anselm’s Monologion. It defends that the arguments in chapters I-IV are parts of a single argumentative way comparable with the fourth way of Thomas Aquinas. The only starting point for the argumentation is the evidence of the degrees of transcendental perfection (goodness and greatness) found in things. According to this single point of departure, the argument also has a single formulation of the principle of causality (...)
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  10. added 2018-05-21
    Peter de Rivo, Boethius and the Problem of Future Contingents.Jonathan Evans - 2001 - Carmina Philosophiae 10:39-55.
    Peter de Rivo (b. ca. 1420), argues for the existence of human freedom despite its alleged incompatibility with the truth of future contingent propositions. Rivo’s solution doesn’t follow the common medieval attempt to dissolve the alleged incompatibility, but claims that future contingent propositions aren’t determinately true. This approach troubled Rivo’s contemporaries, who thought it was incompatible with biblical infallibility, particularly the veracity of prophetic statements. Rivo tries to reconcile his solution with orthodox Christianity by grounding authentic prophetic statements in God’s (...)
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  11. added 2018-05-18
    Book Review: Rethinking Augustine’s Early Theology: An Argument for Continuity by Carol Harrison. [REVIEW]Mark J. Boone - 2009 - Augustinian Studies 40 (1):154-156.
  12. added 2018-05-02
    How Sin Escapes Premotion: The Development of Thomas Aquinas’s Thought by Spanish Thomists.Thomas M. Osborne - 2017 - In Steven Long, Thomas Joseph White & Roger Nutt (eds.), Thomism and Predestination: Principles and Disputations. Ave Maria, Fl: Sapientia. pp. 192-213.
    I argue that Diego Alvarez and Thomas de Lemos through their participation in the De auxiliis controversy developed and defended Cajetan’s view of the causation of sin in such a way that they were able to defend the predetermination of the material aspect of sin while at the same time assimilating important aspects from his critics. It is important to recognize that Lemos and his associates hold both that the premotion of sin’s material aspect is not necessarily connected with the (...)
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  13. added 2018-02-23
    Providence in St. Albert the Great.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2016 - Revista Ciências da Religião: História E Sociedade 14:14-44.
    In these pages, we expose the main traits of St. Albert the Great’s doctrine of providence and fate, considered by Palazzo the keystone of his philosophical system. To describe it we examine his systematic works, primarily his Summa of Theology. His discussion follows clearly the guidelines of the Summa of Alexander of Hales, in order to delve into the set of problems faced over the centuries by theological tradition. Albert also restates the reflections of different authors like Boethius or Saint (...)
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  14. added 2018-02-22
    Analogical Understanding of Divine Causality in Thomas Aquinas.Piotr Roszak - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):133-153.
    The article presents the question of understanding divine causality and its analogical character in the context of Thomas Aquinas’s teaching on Divine Providence. Analyzing Aquinas’s texts concerning the relation of God’s action towards nature and its activities it is necessary to emphasize the proper understanding of mutual relations between secondary causes and the primary cause which are not on the same level. Influenced by the reflection of M. Dodds and I Silva, the author of the article refers to Aquinas’s biblical (...)
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  15. added 2018-02-22
    Theology and Intelligibility (Review).M. Curtin - 1973 - Philosophical Studies 22:306-307.
  16. added 2018-02-18
    Anselm on the Cost of Salvation.Brian Leftow - 1997 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 6 (1):73-92.
    This paper examines Anselm’s reply to this argument in order to shed light on a number of issues in philosophical theology, including the metaphysics of the Incarnation, the relation between perfect being theology and the doctrines of the Incarnation and the Atonement, the senses in which the Christian God might be impassible, and the nature of God’s perfect rationality and wisdom. (edited).
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  17. added 2018-02-17
    Aquinas on Being, Goodness, and God.Christopher Hughes - 2005 - Routledge.
    Thomas Aquinas was the most influential philosopher of the Middle Ages, and one of the most famous Christian theologians of all time. His philosophy is a powerful synthesis of Aristotle and Plato presented within a Christian framework. His "five ways" to prove the existence of God are studied by undergraduates on many theology and philosophy of religion courses. Apart from his specifically theological works, he spent much of his time writing about metaphysics, all of which was to have important ramifications (...)
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  18. added 2018-02-17
    Faith and Freedom: An Interfaith Perspective.David B. Burrell - 2004 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this book, David Burrell, one of the foremost philosophical theologians in the English-speaking world, presents the best of his work on creation and human freedom. A collection of writings by one of the foremost philosophers of religion in the English-speaking world. Brings together in one volume the best of David Burrell’s work on creation and human freedom from the last twenty years. Dismantles the ‘libertarian’ approach to freedom underlying Western political and economic systems. Engages with Islam, Judaism and Christianity, (...)
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  19. added 2018-02-16
    The Five Ways.Timothy Pawl - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press. pp. 115-131.
    I present and evaluate the 5 Ways of St. Thomas Aquinas. I discuss the contentious premises and inferences of the arguments.
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  20. added 2018-01-26
    Why Can’T the Devil Get a Second Chance? A Hidden Contradiction in Anselm’s Account of the Devil’s Fall.Michael Barnwell - 2017 - Saint Anselm Journal 13 (1):39-56.
    The story of the devil’s fall poses at least three separate philosophical puzzles, only two of which Anselm addressed. The first (Puzzle A) wonders how this angel could have committed a sin in the first place since he was created with a good will and good desires. A second puzzle (Puzzle B) consists of trying to explain why the devil cannot ever be forgiven for that first sin. According to Christian teaching, the devil is unable to “repent” (i.e., express sorrow (...)
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  21. added 2017-12-12
    On a Complex Theory of a Simple God: An Investigation in Aquinas’ Philosophical Theology. [REVIEW]Norman Kretzmann & Timothy O'connor - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (4):526-535.
    Review of On a COlllplex Theory of a Simple God: An Investigation in Aquinas' Philosophical Theology, by Christopher M. Hughes.
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  22. added 2017-11-09
    Testimony, Error, and Reasonable Belief in Medieval Religious Epistemology.Richard Cross - 2018 - In Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne & Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  23. added 2017-11-03
    What Lucifer Wanted: Anselm, Aquinas, and Scotus on the Object of the First Evil Choice.Giorgio Pini - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1:61-82.
    This paper discusses the views of three medieval thinkers—Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, and John Duns Scotus—about a specific aspect of the problem of evil, which can be dubbed ‘the Lucifer problem’. What was the object of the first evil choice? What could entice a perfectly rational agent placed in ideal circumstances into doing evil? Those thinkers agreed that Lucifer wanted to be happier, but while Anselm thought that that was something Lucifer could achieve by his natural powers, Aquinas held that it (...)
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  24. added 2017-10-20
    Suárez on Creation and Intrinsic Change.Jacob Tuttle - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):29-51.
    The late scholastic philosopher Francisco Suárez articulates and defends an extraordinarily detailed account of efficient causation. Some of the most interesting and difficult questions connected with this account concern the particular types of efficient causation he acknowledges. This paper clarifies one of the most fundamental distinctions Suárez employs in the course of his treatment of efficient causation—namely, that between motion or change, on the one hand, and creation ex nihilo, on the other. The paper shows that, although motion and creation (...)
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  25. added 2017-10-17
    Beyond the Prime Mover of Aristotle: Faith and Reason in the Medieval Franciscan Tradition.O. Zachary Hayes - 2002 - Franciscan Studies 60:7-15.
  26. added 2017-10-17
    B. Prosperi Aquitani Doctrina de Praedestinatione Et Voluntate Dei Salvifica.A. K. Ziegler - 1939 - New Scholasticism 13 (1):71-71.
  27. added 2017-10-12
    The Medieval Period.Dorothea Weltecke - 2013 - In Stephen Bullivant & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism. Oxford University Press. pp. 164.
    This article points to the influence of medieval debates about the possible non-existence of a God on the formation of modern atheist discourse. On the basis of sources composed by Muslims, Christians and Jews, alleged appearances of disbelief like apostasy, blasphemy, and immoral behaviour are reconsidered. Medieval Latin conceptions of atheism are described as acedia, temptation, and murmur. It is made clear, that doubts or nonbelief in God’s existence were neither rare nor forbidden nor persecuted. Nonbelievers were regarded as fools, (...)
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  28. added 2017-10-12
    E. Grant. God & Reason in the Middle Ages.J. Wawrykow - 2003 - Early Science and Medicine 8 (1):62-64.
  29. added 2017-10-12
    William of Saint Thierry II: God in Man.Geoffrey Webb - 1965 - New Blackfriars 46 (540):522-525.
  30. added 2017-10-07
    "Le "processus in infinitum dans les trois premières "voies" de saint Thomas.Fernand Van Steenberghen - 1974 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 30 (1):127-134.
  31. added 2017-10-03
    Rodrigo Guerizoli. Die Verinnerlichung des Göttlichen. Eine Studie über den Gottesgeburtszyklus und die Armutspredigt Meister Eckharts.Tamar Tsopurashvili - 2007 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 12:224-230.
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  32. added 2017-09-29
    [Inline-graphic xmlns:Xlink="http://Www.w3.Org/1999/xlink" xlink:Href="01i" /] secunda, questio secunda: (Cod. Vat. lat. 1106, F. 85r) utrum sit demonstrabile deum esse causam primam. [REVIEW]Petrus Thomae - 1998 - Franciscan Studies 56 (1):119-151.
  33. added 2017-09-27
    Aquinas’ Five Arguments in the Summa Theologiae 1a 2, 3: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism. [REVIEW]Blažena Švandová - 2009 - Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (1):131-137.
  34. added 2017-09-27
    Naming God-Maimonides, Moses and Aquinas, Thomas.Na Stubbens - 1990 - The Thomist 54 (2):229-267.
  35. added 2017-09-15
    Why the Five Ways? Aquinas’s Avicennian Insight Into the Problem of Unity in the Aristotelian Metaphysics and Sacra Doctrina.Daniel D. De Haan - 2012 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86:141-158.
    This paper will argue that the order and the unity of St. Thomas Aquinas’s five ways can be elucidated through a consideration of St. Thomas’s appropriation of an Avicennian insight that he used to order and unify the wisdom of the Aristotelian and Abrahamic philosophical traditions towards the existence of God. I will begin with a central aporia from Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Aristotle says that the science of first philosophy has three different theoretical vectors: ontology, aitiology, and theology. But how can (...)
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  36. added 2017-03-16
    Philosophy and Knowledge of God in the Works of William of Saint-Thierry.R. Silva - 2000 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 92 (3-4):461-486.
  37. added 2017-03-15
    Peter Thomae's Question on Divine Foreknowledge From His Sentences Commentary.Christopher Schabel - 2003 - Franciscan Studies 61 (1):1-9.
  38. added 2017-03-11
    «Deus Est Mortuus»: Roots of Nietzsche's «Gott Ist Todt!» in the Later Middle Ages.Olaf Pluta - 2001 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 5 (1):129-146.
    This essay presents textual evidence that Nietzsche's slogan «Gott ist todt!» can be found in several texts of the later Middle Ages. Furthermore, it is argued that Nietzsche read one of these texts very early in his life — probably during the six years of his stay at Schulpforta — and that this may be one of the sources of his famous slogan. It is also shown how the slogan «God is dead!» could originate during the later Middle Ages.
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  39. added 2017-03-10
    Hubert Schröcker: Das Verhältnis der Allmacht Gottes zum Kontradiktionsprinzip nach Wilhelm von Ockham.Martin Lenz - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9:227-235.
  40. added 2017-03-08
    Aquinas's Argument for the Existence of God in De Ente Et Essentia Cap. IV: An Interpretation and Defense.Gaven Kerr - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:99-133.
    Aquinas’s name is practically synonymous with attempts at proving the existence of God. In this article I offer an interpretation and defense of a much neglected argument from Aquinas’s works, that of De Ente et Essentia Cap. IV. Therein Aquinas presents quite a youthful and in my view compelling argument for the existence of God. To begin with, I present an interpretation of the argument and on the basis of this interpretation I suggest that the argument has a prima facie (...)
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  41. added 2017-03-08
    Aquinas on the Natural Inclination of Man to Offer Sacrifice to God.Sean B. Cunningham - 2012 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86:185-200.
    Aquinas says that offering sacrifice to God is “of the natural law” because man has a “natural inclination that he should tender submission and honor” to God. Aquinas’s characterization of sacrifice as natural undermines two common mischaracterizations of Aquinas’s natural law theory: that “natural inclinations” means pre-rational “urges” generally and that natural law pertains exclusively to secular matters. For Aquinas, inclinatio naturalis in the sense proper to natural law means those inclinations that follow upon man’s substantial form in a teleological (...)
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  42. added 2017-03-08
    Aquinas, Divine Simplicity, and Divine Freedom.W. Matthews Grant - 2003 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:129-144.
    Aquinas maintains that, although God created the universe, he could have created another or simply refrained from creating altogether. That Aquinas believesin divine free choice is uncontroversial. Yet doubts have been raised as to whether Thomas is entitled to this belief, given his claims concerning divine simplicity.According to simplicity, there is no potentiality in God, nor is there a distinction in God between God’s willing, His essence, and His necessary being. On the surface, it appears that these claims leave no (...)
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  43. added 2017-03-08
    Grounding Providence in the Theology of the Creator: The Exemplarity of Thomas Aquinas.Michael A. Hoonhout - 2002 - Heythrop Journal 43 (1):1-19.
    Discussion of divine providence was traditionally grounded in the wisdom and benevolence of the Creator, until the impact of nominalism which narrowed the theological focus upon the absolute power and freedom of the divine will. An exemplary approach for discussing providence which predates nominalism and which has surprising contemporary relevance is the one developed by Thomas Aquinas in his Summa Theologiae. It is exemplary both for how it discusses providence and for what is says about it. Methodologically, Aquinas explains providence (...)
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  44. added 2017-03-08
    Thomas Aquinas and Divine Command Theory.M. Dougherty - 2002 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:153-164.
    Nearly all attempts to include Aquinas among the class of divine command theorists have focused on two kinds of texts: those exhibiting Aquinas’s treatment of the apparent immoralities of the patriarchs, and those pertaining to Aquinas’s discussion of the divine will. In the present paper, I lay out a third approach unrelated to these two. I argue that Aquinas’s explicit endorsement of one ethical proposition as self-evident throughout his writings is sufficient justification to include Aquinas among the class of divine (...)
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  45. added 2017-03-08
    Contra Spinoza: Aquinas on God’s Free Will.John F. Knasas - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3):417-429.
    My article confronts three of Spinoza’s four arguments against free will in God with Aquinas’s contrary position in the Summa contra Gentiles, Book I. Spinoza’s three arguments come from his Ethics, props. XVII and XXXII. First, since free choice is always exclusive, free choice in God would leave unactualized power in God. Second, if God’s will could be different without entailing divine mutability, then a divine voluntarism would reign. Third, if God has freedom of will but his willing is his (...)
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  46. added 2017-03-08
    Divine Infinity in Thomas Aquinas: I. Philosophico‐Theological Background.Robert M. Burns - 1998 - Heythrop Journal 39 (1):57-69.
    A reassessment of Aquinas’s doctrine of divine infinity, particularly in the light of the previous history of the concept within Western philosophy and theology. From the critical perspective provided by this history the central place which has been claimed for it in Aquinas’s thinking is questioned, as are also its originality and coherence. The notion that the doctrine of divine infinity was introduced to Western thought by Judaeo‐Christianity is rejected; from Anaximander onwards it had been a central concept in Greek (...)
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  47. added 2017-03-07
    The Epistemology of Faith in Augustine and Aquinas.Paul A. Macdonald Jr - 2010 - In Phillip Cary, John Doody & Kim Paffenroth (eds.), Augustine and Philosophy. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. pp. 167-196.
    In this essay, I discuss and defend Augustine’s and Aquinas’s respective epistemologies of faith. This entails analyzing central claims both thinkers make in order to determine the ways in which the true beliefs about God the faithful form and hold are reasonable as well as properly grounded. In the first two sections of the essay, I highlight what I take to be some of Augustine’s enduring epistemological insights concerning the reasonableness and origins of faith. I read Aquinas’s own account of (...)
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  48. added 2017-03-07
    Recent Thomistic Epistemology and Philosophy of Religion.Paul A. Macdonald Jr - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (3):517–533.
    The purpose of this article is to show the contribution of recent Thomistic epistemology - that is, an epistemology rooted in the philosophical theology of Thomas Aquinas - makes to contemporary philosophy of religion. In particular, I show how recent philosophers and theologians (most of them of a distinctly analytic persuasion) are appropriating insights in Aquinas’s philosophical theology in order to address perennial epistemological issues: most broadly, how it is that human persons know the world as well as the divine. (...)
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  49. added 2017-03-02
    Edward Grant, God and Reason in the Middle Ages. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. Ix, 397; 2 Black-and-White Figures. $64.95 ; $22.95. [REVIEW]G. R. Evans - 2003 - Speculum 78 (4):1299-1300.
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  50. added 2017-03-02
    Das Isaak-Opfer. Historisch-Systematische Untersuchung Zu Rationalität Und Wandelbarkeit des Naturrechts in der Mittelalterlichen Lehre Vom Natürlichen Gesetz.O. David Flood - 2002 - Franciscan Studies 60:373-378.
1 — 50 / 514