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  1. Bayesian Inference, Predictive Coding and Delusions.Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston - 2015 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3:51-88.
    This paper considers psychotic symptoms in terms of false inferences or beliefs. It is based on the notion that the brain is an organ of inference that actively constructs hypotheses to explain or predict its sensations. This perspective provides a normative account of action and perception that emphasises probabilistic representations; in particular, the confidence or precision of beliefs about the world. We consider sensory attenuation deficits, catatonia and delusions as various expressions of the same core pathology: namely, an aberrant encoding (...)
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  2. The Psychopathology of American Shyness: A Hermeneutic Reading.Kevin Aho - 2010 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (2):190-206.
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  3. Working Towards a New Psychiatry - Neuroscience, Technology and the DSM-5.Sabina Alam, Jigisha Patel & James Giordano - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-.
    This Editorial introduces the thematic series on 'Toward a New Psychiatry: Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Classification, Diagnosis and Care' http://www.biomedcentral.com/series/newpsychiatry.
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  4. How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes": Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist.Nomy Arpaly - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
    Many psychiatrists tell their clients that any mental disorder is ‘‘a disease, just like diabetes’’. This slogan appears to suggest that mental states and behavior that are classified ‘‘mental disorders’’ are somehow radically different from other mental states and behaviors—both when it comes to simply understanding people and when it comes to moral assessments of mental states and of actions. After all, mental illness is just like diabetes, while other human conditions are not. That sounds like a huge difference. I (...)
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  5. Clarifying the Relationship Between Vice and Mental Disorder: Vice as Manifestation of a Psychological Dysfunction.Michael B. - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (1):35-38.
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  6. Mind and Mental Health Based on a Realistic Constructivism.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast & Zohreh Khosravi - 2006 - Constructivism in the Human Sciences 11 (1/2):20-31.
    This essay concerns a philosophical examination of the nature of mind and the relevant implications for mental health. Traditionally, realism and constructivism are regarded as two contrastive positions in explaining the nature of mind. While realists take discovery of reality as the main function of mind, constructivists regard it as creation of reality. Hence, epistemologically, realists emphasize on correspondence to reality as the criterion of validity or truth of the mind's contents, whereas constructivists regard the inner coherence of constructs as (...)
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  7. Impaired Recognition of Negative Facial Emotions in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia.S. E. Black - unknown
    Patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have difficulties recognizing facial emotions, a deficit that may contribute to their impaired social skills. In three experiments, we investigated the FTD deficit in recognition of facial emotions, by comparing six patients with impaired social conduct, nine Alzheimer’s patients, and 10 age-matched healthy adults. Experiment 1 revealed that FTD patients were impaired in the recognition of negative facial emotions. Experiment 2 replicated these findings when participants had to determine whether two faces were (...)
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  8. The Application of Nondual Epistemology to Anomalous Experience in Psychosis.Caroline Brett - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):353-358.
  9. The Rationality of Psychosis and Understanding the Deluded.Matthew R. Broome - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (1):35-41.
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  10. Aesthetics, Ethics, and the Experience of Self.John S. Callender - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):311-313.
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  11. On What There Really Is to Our Notion of Ownership of a Thought.Annalisa Coliva - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):41-46.
  12. The Impact of the Label of Mild Cognitive Impairment on the Individual's Sense of Self.Lynne Corner & John Bond - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):3-12.
  13. Phenomenology and Psychiatry.A. J. J. de Koning & F. A. Jenner (eds.) - 1982 - Grune & Stratton.
  14. Obsessionality & Compulsivity: A Phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Damiaan Denys - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):3-.
    Progress in psychiatry depends on accurate definitions of disorders. As long as there are no known biologic markers available that are highly specific for a particular psychiatric disorder, clinical practice as well as scientific research is forced to appeal to clinical symptoms. Currently, the nosology of obsessive-compulsive disorder is being reconsidered in view of the publication of DSM-V. Since our diagnostic entities are often simplifications of the complicated clinical profile of patients, definitions of psychiatric disorders are imprecise and always indeterminate. (...)
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  15. Impaired Self-Reflection in Psychiatric Disorders Among Adults: A Proposal for the Existence of a Network of Semi Independent Functions.Giancarlo Dimaggio, Stijn Vanheule, Paul H. Lysaker, Antonino Carcione & Giuseppe Nicolò - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):653-664.
    Self-reflection plays a key role in healthy human adaptation. Self-reflection might involve different capacities which may be impaired to different degrees relatively independently of one another. Variation in abilities for different forms of self-reflection are commonly seen as key aspects of many adult mental disorders. Yet little has been written about whether there are different kinds of deficits in self-reflection found in mental illness, how those deficits should be distinguished from one another and how to characterize the extent to which (...)
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  16. Language, Logic, and Recovery: A Commentary on van Staden.Paul Falzer & Larry Davidson - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):131-136.
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  17. A Liberal Account of Addiction.Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):1-22.
    Philosophers and psychologists have been attracted to two differing accounts of addictive motivation. In this paper, we investigate these two accounts and challenge their mutual claim that addictions compromise a person’s self-control. First, we identify some incompatibilities between this claim of reduced self-control and the available evidence from various disciplines. A critical assessment of the evidence weakens the empirical argument for reduced autonomy. Second, we identify sources of unwarranted normative bias in the popular theories of addiction that introduce systematic errors (...)
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  18. Relating Addiction to Disease, Disability, Autonomy, and the Good Life.Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):35-42.
    Concepts We thank all three commentators for extremely constructive, insightful, and gracious commentaries. We cannot address all their valuable points. In this response, we elucidate and relate the concepts of addiction, disease, disability, autonomy, and well-being. We examine some of the implications of these relationships in the context of the helpful responses made by our commentators. We begin with the definitions of the relevant concepts which we employ: ¥? ? ? Addiction (Liberal Concept): An addiction is a strong appetite. ¥? (...)
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  19. Mind, Meaning, and the Brain.Thomas Fuchs - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):261-264.
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  20. The Tacit Dimension.Thomas Fuchs - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):323-326.
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  21. Taking the Long View: An Emerging Framework for Translational Psychiatric Science.Bill Fulford, Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome - 2014 - World Psychiatry 13 (2):110-117.
    Understood in their historical context, current debates about psychiatric classification, prompted by the publication of the DSM-5, open up new opportunities for improved translational research in psychiatry. In this paper, we draw lessons for translational research from three time slices of 20th century psychiatry. From the first time slice, 1913 and the publication of Jaspers’ General Psychopathology, the lesson is that translational research in psychiatry requires a pluralistic approach encompassing equally the sciences of mind (including the social sciences) and of (...)
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  22. Three Challenges From Delusion for Theories of Autonomy.K. W. M. Fulford & Lubomira Radoilska - 2012 - In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press. pp. 44-74.
    This chapter identifies and explores a series of challenges raised by the clinical concept of delusion for theories which conceive autonomy as an agency rather than a status concept. The first challenge is to address the autonomy-impairing nature of delusions consistently with their role as grounds for full legal and ethical excuse, on the one hand, and psychopathological significance as key symptoms of psychoses, on the other. The second challenge is to take into account the full logical range of delusions, (...)
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  23. Mental Disorders as Lacks of Mental Capacities.Alfredo Gaete - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):345-347.
    This is a reply to Gipps' commentary on my 'The Concept of Mental Disorder'.
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  24. The Concept of Mental Disorder: A Proposal.Alfredo Gaete - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):327-339.
    During the last years, there has been an important discussion on the concept of mental disorder. Several accounts of such a concept have been offered by theorists, although neither of these accounts seems to have successfully answered both the question of what it means for a certain mental condition to be a disorder and the question of what it means for a certain disorder to be mental. In this paper, I propose an account of the concept of mental disorder that, (...)
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  25. Anorexia and Refusal of Life-Saving Treatment: The Moral Place of Competence, Suffering, and the Family.Simona Giordano - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):143-154.
    A large part of the debate around the right to refuse life-prolonging treatment of anorexia nervosa sufferers centers on the issue of competence. Whether or not the anorexic should be allowed to refuse life-saving treatment does not depend solely or primarily on competence. It also depends on whether the anorexic’s suffering is bearable or tractable, and on the degree of involvement of the family in the therapeutic process. Anorexics could be competent to refuse lifesaving treatment (Giordano 2008). However, the anorexic’s (...)
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  26. Pathology of the Mind: Disorder Versus Disability.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):341-344.
  27. Normality, Therapy, and Enhancement - What Should Bioconservatives Say About the Medicalization of Love?Alberto Giubilini - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):347-354.
    According to human enhancement advocates, it is morally permissible (and sometimes obligatory) to use biomedical means to modulate or select certain biological traits in order to increase people’s welfare, even when there is no pathology to be treated or prevented. Some authors have recently proposed to extend the use of biomedical means to modulate lust, attraction, and attachment. I focus on some conceptual implications of this proposal, particularly with regard to bioconservatives’ understanding of the notions of therapy and enhancement I (...)
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  28. Idem, Ipse, and Loss of the Self.G. Glas - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):347-352.
  29. Hallucinations and Antipsychotics: The Role of the 5-HT2A Receptor.Andrew James Goudie & Jonathan Charles Cole - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):795-796.
    Behrendt & Young's (B&Y's) novel “unifying model” of hallucinations, although comprehensive, fails to incorporate research into the possible role of 5-HT2A receptors in the mode of action of novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs (which treat hallucinations effectively), and into the role of such receptors, which are located in thalamocortical circuits, in mediating drug-induced hallucinations.
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  30. In and Out of Me.George Graham - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):323-326.
  31. Delusions in the Phenomenological Perspective.Andrzej Kapusta - 2015 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (3):113-125.
    The aim of the article is to present the contemporary concepts of delusions from the phenomenological perspective. The difficulties to define delusions and the examples of delusional disorders, such as delusional mood, Cotard’s syndrome, or Capgras delusions, serve as the point of departure for this analysis. The questions of the phenomenological understanding of delusions are presented in the context of Karl Jaspers' theory of the incomprehensibility of psychotic thinking (primary delusions, delusional mood). The subsequent analysis presents the constraints of contemporary (...)
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  32. Vagueness in Psychiatry.Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of ‘subthreshold disorders’ and of the ‘prodromal stages’ of diseases are notoriously contentious. -/- Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, ‘vague’. Although blurred boundaries between the normal and the pathological are a recurrent theme in (...)
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  33. The Moral Goal of Treatment in Cases of Dual Diagnosis.Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews - 2006 - In John Kleinig & Stanley Einstein (eds.), Ethical challenges for intervening in drug use: policy, research and treatment issues. OICJ. pp. 409-36.
    Substance use and misuse occurs at a very high rate among people with mental health problems and the relationship between the two conditions is complex. In this paper we argue that treatment of substance use in dual diagnosis clients must begin from an understanding of the losses suffered by those with mental illness. We outline the fundamental condition of effective agency, unified agency, which is disrupted in mental illness and show how this is needed to secure access to central social (...)
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  34. Lalumera, E. 2017 (in Press) Understanding Schizophrenia Through Wittgenstein: Empathy, Explanation, and Philosophical Clarification, in Schizophrenia and Common Sense, Hipólito, I., Gonçalves, J., Pereira, J. (Eds.). SpringerNature, Mind-Brain Studies.E. Lalumera - forthcoming - In I. Hipolito, J. Goncalves & J. Pereira (eds.), Schizophrenia and Common Sense, Hipólito, I., Gonçalves, J., Pereira, J. (eds.). SpringerNature, Mind-Brain Studies. Dordrecht: Springer.
    Wittgenstein’s concepts shed light on the phenomenon of schizophrenia in at least three different ways: with a view to empathy, scientific explanation, or philosophical clarification. I consider two different “positive” wittgensteinian accounts―Campbell’s idea that delusions involve a mechanism of which different framework propositions are parts, Sass’ proposal that the schizophrenic patient can be described as a solipsist, and a Rhodes’ and Gipp’s account, where epistemic aspects of schizophrenia are explained as failures in the ordinary background of certainties. I argue that (...)
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  35. A Methodological Flaw in ‘The Neural Basis of Flashback Formation: The Impact of Viewing Trauma’.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Psychological Medicine 46 (8):1785-1786.
    In their 2013 study of traumatic flashback formation, Bourne, Mackay and Holmes raise the question of whether the propensity of a traumatic experience to produce flashbacks is determined by the emotions that are felt at the time of that experience. They suggest that it is not, but the grounds on which they make this suggestion are flawed. Further research is required. That research will need to overcome a significant methodological difficulty — one which is hard to avoid when fMRI data (...)
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  36. Causes and Correlates of Intrusive Memory: A Response to Clark, MacKay, Holmes and Bourne.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Psychological Medicine 46 (15):3255-3258.
  37. Personal Autonomy, Decisional Capacity, and Mental Disorder.Lubomira Radoilska - 2012 - In Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.
    In this Introduction, I situate the underlying project “Autonomy and Mental Disorder” with reference to current debates on autonomy in moral and political philosophy, and the philosophy of action. I then offer an overview of the individual contributions. More specifically, I begin by identifying three points of convergence in the debates at issue, stating that autonomy is: 1) a fundamentally liberal concept; 2) an agency concept and; 3) incompatible with (severe) mental disorder. Next, I explore, in the context of decisional (...)
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  38. Die Melancholie, der Geist des Kapitalismus und die Depression.Marco Solinas - 2010 - Freie Assoziation 13 (4):79-99.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  39. Sulle tracce della malinconia. Un approccio filosofico-sociale.Marco Solinas - 2009 - Costruzioni Psicoanalitiche (17):83-102.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  40. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  41. Models of Mental Illness.Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - 2016 - In Harold Kincaid, Jeremy Simon & Miriam Solomon (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Medicine. Routledge. pp. 455-464.
    This chapter has two aims. The first aim is to compare and contrast three different conceptual-explanatory models for thinking about mental illness with an eye towards identifying the assumptions upon which each model is based, and exploring the model’s advantages and limitations in clinical contexts. Major Depressive Disorder is used as an example to illustrate these points. The second aim is to address the question of what conceptual-theoretical framework for thinking about mental illness is most likely to facilitate the discovery (...)
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  42. Specific Mechanisms Versus General Theories in the Classification of Disorders.David Trafimow - 2011 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 4 (1):16-17.
    Oulis pointed out that there is a great deal of interest in specific mechanisms relating to mental disorders and that these mechanisms should play a role in classification. Although specific mechanisms are important, more attention should be given to general theories. The following example from Salmon illustrates the difference.
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  43. Life’s Meaning and Late Life Rational Suicide.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - In Robert E. McCue & Meera Balasubramaniam (eds.), Rational Suicide in the Elderly. Springer. pp. 83-98.
    Suicidal ideation would often appear to relate to ideas about life’s meaninglessness. In this chapter, I consider the suicidal thoughts of an elderly person in light of the recent philosophical discussion on the meaning of life. I start by distinguishing between two importantly different questions about life’s meaning and explaining how they differ from certain other issues sometimes treated as questions about the meaning of life. Then I address the two questions about life’s meaning in turn, connecting them to the (...)
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  44. How to Fake Munchausen's Syndrome.Michael Veber - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):565-574.
    Sorensen raises the issue of whether it is logically possible to fake Munchausen's syndrome by way of a fictional exchange between a physician and an insurance company. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to fake Munchausen's syndrome and to fake faking Munchausen's syndrome. The implications of this on deeper philosophical issues such as Lewis' puzzle of iterated pretence and “internalist” versus “externalist” accounts of faking are discussed. An externalist account of faking is defended and offered as (...)
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  45. Amending the Revisionist Model of the Capgras Delusion: A Further Argument for the Role of Patient Experience in Delusional Belief Formation.Garry Young - 2015 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (3):89-112.
    Recent papers on the Capgras delusion have focused on the role played by subpersonal abductive inference in the formation and maintenance of the delusional belief. In these accounts, the delusional belief is posited as the first delusion-related event of which the patient is conscious. As a consequence, an explanatory role for anomalous patient experience is denied. The aim of this paper is to challenge this revisionist position and to integrate subpersonal inference within a model of the Capgras delusion which includes (...)
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