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  1. Virgin Vs. Chad: On Enforced Monogamy as a Solution to the Incel Problem.Dan Demetriou - manuscript
    Controversially, psychologist and public intellectual Jordan Peterson advises “enforced monogamy” for societies with high percentages of “incels.” As Peterson’s proposal resonates in manosphere circles, this chapter reconstructs and briefly evaluates the argument for it. Premised on the moral importance of civilizational sustainability, advocates argue that both polygamous and socially monogamous but sexually liberal mating patterns result in unsustainable proportions of unattached young men. Given the premises, monogamous societies are probably justified in maintaining their anti-polygamist social and legal norms. The case (...)
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  2. Compersion: An Alternative to Jealousy?Luke Brunning - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (2):225-245.
    Compersion is an important concept for non-monogamous people. Often described as jealousy's opposite, compersion labels positive feelings toward the intimacy of a beloved with other people. Since many people think jealousy is ordinary, intransigent, and even appropriate, compersion can seem psychologically and ethically dubious. I make the case for compersion, arguing it focuses on the flourishing of others and is thus not akin to pride, vicarious enjoyment, or masochistic pleasure. People cultivate compersion by softening their propensity to be jealous and (...)
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  3. Monogamies, Non-Monogamies, and the Moral Impermissibility of Intimacy Confining Constraints.Justin L. Clardy - 2020 - Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationship 2 (6):17-36.
  4. Why, and to What Extent, is Sexual Infidelity Wrong?Natasha McKeever - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):515-537.
    Sexual infidelity is widespread, but it is also widely condemned, yet relatively little philosophical work has been done on what makes it wrong and how wrong it is. In this paper, I argue that sexual infidelity is wrong if it involves breaking a commitment to be sexually exclusive, which has special significance in the relationship. However, it is not necessarily worse than other kinds of infidelity, and the context in which it takes place ought to be considered. I finish the (...)
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  5. Consent Is Not Enough: A Case Against Liberal Sexual Ethics.David McPherson - 2020 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), College Ethics: A Reader on Moral Issues that Affect You, 2nd edition. Oxford University Press.
    The standard liberal sexual ethic maintains that consent is the only requirement for ethical sexual relations. While consent is certainly necessary for an adequate sexual ethic (and it’s important to know what it involves), I argue that it’s far from sufficient. The key claims that I advance are the following: (1) The consent-only model of sexual ethics affirms a “casual” view of sex and therefore it can’t make sense of and properly combat what’s worst in the sexual domain: namely, the (...)
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  6. Why Monogamy is Morally Permissible: A Defense of Some Common Justifications for Monogamy.Kyle York - 2020 - Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (4):539-552.
    Harry Chalmers argues that monogamy involves restricting one’s partner’s access to goods in a morally troubling way that is analogous to an agreement between partners to have no additional friends. Chalmers finds the traditional defenses of monogamy wanting, since they would also justify a friendship-restricting agreement. I show why three traditional defenses of monogamy hold up quite well and why they don’t, for the most part, also justify friendship-restricting agreements. In many cases, monogamy can be justified on grounds of practicality, (...)
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  7. Is Monogamy Morally Permissible?Harry Chalmers - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):225-241.
    Commonsense morality holds that monogamy is morally permissible. In this paper I will challenge this, arguing that monogamy is in fact morally impermissible. First I’ll argue that monogamy’s restriction on having additional partners seems analogous to a morally troubling restriction on having additional friends. Faced with this apparent analogy, the defender of monogamy must find a morally relevant difference between the two kinds of restriction. Yet, as I’ll argue, there seems to be no such morally relevant difference, for the standard (...)
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  8. Justin Clardy on Love and Relationships.Justin L. Clardy - 2019 - In Myisha Cherry (ed.), Unmuted: Conversations on Prejudice, Oppression, and Social Justice. pp. 242-247.
  9. Dimming the “Halo” Around Monogamy: Re-Assessing Stigma Surrounding Consensually Non-Monogamous Romantic Relationships as a Function of Personal Relationship Orientation.Rhonda N. Balzarini, Erin J. Shumlich, Taylor Kohut & Lorne Campbell - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  10. How Complex is Your Love? The Case of Romantic Compromises and Polyamory.Aaron Ben-Ze’ev & Luke Brunning - 2018 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 48 (1):98-116.
    This article highlights a somewhat neglected aspect of love : their complexity. We suggest distinguishing between three major related types of emotional complexity: emotional diversity, emotional ambivalence, and emotional behavior. The notion of emotional complexity has far-reaching implications for understanding emotions and our wellbeing. This is illustrated by examining the notion of emotional complexity in two common yet complex phenomena in the romantic realm: romantic compromises and polyamory.
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  11. The Distinctiveness of Polyamory.Luke Brunning - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):513-531.
    Polyamory is a form of consensual non-monogamy. To render it palatable to critics, activists and theorists often accentuate its similarity to monogamy. I argue that this strategy conceals the distinctive character of polyamorous intimacy. A more discriminating account of polyamory helps me answer objections to the lifestyle whilst noting some of its unique pitfalls. I define polyamory, and explain why people pursue this lifestyle. Many think polyamory is an inferior form of intimacy; I describe four of their main objections. I (...)
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  12. 'I Dont Want To Be a Playa No More': An Exploration of the Denigrating Effects of 'Player' as a Stereotype Against African American Polyamorous Men.Justin L. Clardy - 2018 - Analize Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies 1 (11):38-58.
    This paper shows how amatonormativity and its attendant social pressures converge at the intersections of race, gender, romantic relationality, and sexuality to generate peculiar challenges to polyamorous African American men in American society. Contrary to the view maintained in the “slut-vs-stud” phenomenon, I maintain that the label ‘player’ when applied to polyamorous African American men functions as a pernicious stereotype and has denigrating effects. Specifically, I argue that stereotyping polyamorous African American men as players estranges them from themselves and it (...)
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  13. The Monogamous Conception of Romantic Love and Western Critiques of Polygamy in African Traditions.Polycarp Ikuenobe - 2018 - Philosophical Papers 47 (3):373-401.
    I critically examine how, from a Western cultural perspective of romantic love and Judeo-Christian tradition, certain liberal cultural values and prejudices are used presumptuously to criticize polygamy in African traditions. These criticisms assume, circularly, the superiority of Western cultural monogamous values over African cultural traditional practice of polygamy. I argue that these arguments are specious and particularly unreasonable from an intercultural philosophical perspective. A plausible liberal justification for Western legal imposition of monogamy is to prevent harm. I argue that if (...)
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  14. Is the Requirement of Sexual Exclusivity Consistent with Romantic Love?Natasha McKeever - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):353-369.
    In some cultures, people tend to believe that it is very important to be sexually exclusive in romantic relationships and idealise monogamous romantic relationships; but there is a tension in this ideal. Sex is generally considered to have value, and usually when we love someone we want to increase the amount of value in their lives, not restrict it without good reason. There is thus a call, not yet adequately responded to by philosophers, for greater clarity in the reasons §why (...)
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  15. Egalitarian Sexism: Kant’s Defense of Monogamy and its Implications for the Future Evolution of Marriage II.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2017 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 3 (7):127-144.
    This second part of a two-part series exploring implications of the natural differences between the sexes for the cultural evolution of marriage considers how the institution of marriage might evolve, if Kant’s reasons for defending monogamy are extended and applied to a future culture. After summarizing the philosophical framework for making cross-cultural ethical assessments that was introduced in Part I and then explaining Kant’s portrayal of marriage as an antidote to the objectifying tendencies of sex, I summarize Kant’s reasons for (...)
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  16. Polyamory Is to Polygamy as Queer Is to Barbaric?Shelley M. Park - 2017 - Radical Philosophy Review 20 (2):297-328.
    This paper critically examines the ways in which dominant poly discourses position polyamorists among other queer and feminist-friendly practices while setting polygamists outside of those practices as the heteronormative and hyper-patriarchal antithesis to queer kinship. I begin by examining the interlocking liberal discourses of freedom, secularism and egalitarianism that frame the putative distinction between polyamory and polygamy. I then argue that the discursive antinomies of polyamory/polygamy demarcate a distinction that has greater affective resonance than logical validity—an affective resonance, moreover, that (...)
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  17. Adultery, Open Marriage, and Autonomy.Mark Piper - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):219-229.
    It is often claimed that adultery can be morally permissible in cases where those engaged in adulterous behavior are part of an open marriage. Yet this only follows if the institution of open marriage itself can be justified. This problem has been generally overlooked, but it deserves attention, as it is far from evident that open marriage has sterling moral credentials. I argue that the most promising general justification of the institution of open marriage is not based on consequentialist or (...)
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  18. Modal Monogamy.C. S. I. Jenkins - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
  19. Two Models of Disestablished Marriage.Vaughn Bryan Baltzly - 2014 - Public Affairs Quarterly 28 (1):41-69.
    Many theorists have recently observed that the response to the same-sex marriage controversy most congruent with basic liberal principles is neither the retention of the institution of marriage in its present form, nor its extension so as to include same-sex unions along with heterosexual ones, but rather the ‘dis-establishment’ of marriage. Less commonly observed, however, is the fact that there are two competing models for how the state might effect a regime of disestablished marriage. On the one hand, there is (...)
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  20. Recognizing Care: The Case for Friendship and Polyamory.Elizabeth Brake - 2014 - Syracuse Law and Civic Engagement Forum 1 (1).
    This paper responds to arguments that polyamorous groups or care networks do not qualify for equal treatment with marriages. It refutes the points that polyamory is inherently hierarchical or unstable, that there are too few people in such arrangements to mount an argument for recognition, that polyamory harms children, and that there are insurmountable legal and practical hurdles to network marriage. Finally, it respond to the charge that extending recognition to polyamorists will devalue the recognition of same-sex marriage.
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  21. The Ethics (and Economics) of Tibetan Polyandry.Jonathan Stoltz - 2014 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 21:601-622.
    Fraternal polyandry—one woman simultaneously being married to two or more brothers—has been a prominent practice within Tibetan agricultural societies for many generations. While the topic of Tibetan polyandry has been widely discussed in the field of anthropology, there are, to my knowledge, no contributions by philosophers on this topic. For this reason alone, my brief analysis of the ethics of Tibetan polyandry will serve to enhance scholars’ understanding of this practice. In this article I examine the factors that have sustained (...)
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  22. What Marriage Law Can Learn From Citizenship Law.Govind Persad - 2013 - Tul. Jl and Sexuality 22:103.
    Citizenship and marriage are legal statuses that generate numerous privileges and responsibilities. Legal doctrine and argument have analogized these statuses in passing: consider, for example, Ted Olson’s statement in the Hollingsworth v. Perry oral argument that denying the label “marriage” to gay unions “is like you were to say you can vote, you can travel, but you may not be a citizen.” However, the parallel between citizenship and marriage has rarely been investigated in depth. This paper investigates the marriage-citizenship parallel (...)
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  23. Families – Beyond the Nuclear Ideal.Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan - 2012 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book examines, through a multi-disciplinary lens, the possibilities offered by relationships and family forms that challenge the nuclear family ideal, and some of the arguments that recommend or disqualify these as legitimate units in our societies. That children should be conceived naturally, born to and raised by their two young, heterosexual, married to each other, genetic parents; that this relationship between parents is also the ideal relationship between romantic or sexual partners; and that romance and sexual intimacy ought to (...)
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  24. Natural Selection, Childrearing, and the Ethics of Marriage (and Divorce): Building a Case for the Neuroenhancement of Human Relationships. [REVIEW]Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):561-587.
    We argue that the fragility of contemporary marriages—and the corresponding high rates of divorce—can be explained (in large part) by a three-part mismatch: between our relationship values, our evolved psychobiological natures, and our modern social, physical, and technological environment. “Love drugs” could help address this mismatch by boosting our psychobiologies while keeping our values and our environment intact. While individual couples should be free to use pharmacological interventions to sustain and improve their romantic connection, we suggest that they may have (...)
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  25. Monogamy.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2012 - In George Kurian (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Christian Civilisation. Blackwell.
    The word monogamy derives from the Greek words μóνoδ meaning one and γάμoδ meaning marriage. When Christianity was founded, polygamy (the marriage of a man to many women) was, at that point in Judaic history, regarded as acceptable practice. The Gospel according to Matthew reports that Christ restored marriage to its original unity and indissolubility (Matt. 19:6). Monogamy is still deeply entrenched in the Christian tradition. It has long been held that polygamy and polyandry undermine the dignity due to man (...)
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  26. Liberal Feminism and the Ethics of Polygamy.Simon Căbulea May - 2012 - In Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan (eds.), Families - Beyond the Nuclear Ideal. Bloomsbury Academic.
    I distinguish two ways that a cultural practice may be inherently objectionable. I reject the claim that polygamy is inherently "vicious" because asymmetric marriages are inevitably inegalitarian. I argue that there is good reason to think polygamy is inherently "bankrupt" insofar as a cultural ideal of asymmetric marriage presupposes stereotypical gender roles.
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  27. Voles, Vasopressin, and Infidelity: A Molecular Basis for Monogamy, a Platform for Ethics, and More?Daniel J. McKaughan - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):521-543.
    Voles are attracting attention because genetic variation at a single locus appears to have a profound impact on a complex social behavior, namely monogamy. After briefly reviewing the state of the most relevant scientific literature, I examine the way that this research gets taken up by the popular media, by scientists, and by the notable philosopher of neuroscience Patricia Churchland and interpreted as having deeply revisionary implications for how we ordinarily understand ourselves as persons. We have all these big questions (...)
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  28. Trust and Responsibility in Sexual Ethics in the Context of HIV/AIDS.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2011 - SUVIDYA The Journal of Philosophy and Religion 5 (2):105-112.
    Sexual ethics is an important area of discussion in the contemporary ethical debates. The discussions on sexual ethics gained relevance especially in the context of the raise of Global epidemic of HIV/AIDS, which is threatening the human life at large. Trust and Responsibility form the basic pillars of any human relationship including the relation of sexual partners. The present paper discusses the place of ‘trust’ and ‘responsibility’ in the sexual ethics in the context of HIV/AIDS. It argues that only in (...)
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  29. Comments on Eric M. Cave's "Sexual Liberalism and Seduction.Mary MacLeod - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
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  30. Cheating with Jenna: Monogamy, Pornography and Erotica.Fiona Woollard - 2010 - In Porn: Philosophy for Everyone- How to Think With Kink. Malden MA, USA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 93-104.
    How would you feel about your husband, wife, or partner masturbating using pornography or erotica? For many, this would be a betrayal – a kind of cheating. I explore whether monogamous relationships should forbid solo masturbation using erotica and pornography, considering two possible objections: (1) the objection that such activity is a kind of infidelity; (2) the objection that such activity involves attitudes, usually attitudes towards women that are incompatible with an equal, loving relationship. I argue that the use of (...)
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  31. The Problem with Polygamy.Thom Brooks - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):109-122.
    Polygamy is a hotly contested practice and open to widespread misunderstandings. This practice is defined as a relationship between either one husband and multiple wives or one wife and multiple husbands. Today, “polygamy” almost exclusively takes the form of one husband with multiple wives. In this article, my focus will center on limited defenses of polygamy offered recently by Chesire Calhoun and Martha Nussbaum. I will argue that these defenses are unconvincing. The problem with polygamy is primarily that it is (...)
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  32. The Monogamy Gene Could Also Act in Humans.Luis Santiago Lario Herrero - 2008 - Tendencias21 2008.
    Research has revealed that genetic variations in the human gene AVPR1A affect the disposition and aptitude of individuals to live in a relationship. Thus the activity of this gene could influence the quality of marital relationships and very likely our emotional inclinations.
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  33. Marriage and the Norm of Monogamy.Bryan R. Weaver & Fiona Woollard - 2008 - The Monist 91 (3-4):506-522.
    It appears that spouses have less reason to hold each other to a norm of monogamy than to reject the norm. The norm of monogamy involves a restriction of spouses' aeeess to two things of value: sex and erotic love. This restriction initially appears unwarranted but can be justified. There is reason for spouses to aeeept the norm of monogamy if their marriage satisfies three conditions. Otherwise, there is reason to permit non-monogamy. Some spouses have reason to accept the norm (...)
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  34. Monogamy, Motherhood and Health.”.C. S. Carter - 2007 - In Stephen G. Post (ed.), Altruism and Health: Perspectives From Empirical Research. Oup Usa. pp. 371--388.
  35. Homo Sapiens: Are We a Monogamous Species?Santiago Lario Ladrón & Luis Santiago Lario Herrero - 2003 - A Parte Rei 30.
    In order for the process of hominization to continue, with its prolonged and extreme period of juvenile defencelessness, it was necessary, or at least convenient, for males to more actively participate in the care of females and offspring. This necessity, together with the abrupt loss of hominid sexual dimorphism starting with Homo ergaster (more than 1.5 million years ago) suggests to the authors that our ancestor’s sexuality might have evolved around the same time from an earlier state of polygamy to (...)
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  36. Bisexual Monogamy: Twice the Temptation but Half the Fun?Kayley Vernallis - 1999 - Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (3):347–368.
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  37. Against Monogamy.Leo Bersani - 1998 - Oxford Literary Review 20 (1):3-22.
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  38. Monogamy, Nonmonogamy, and Identity.Christine Overall - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):1 - 17.
    After a brief discussion of the terms "monogamy" and "nonmonogamy," I evaluate explanations offered by different theorists for the pain that nonmonogamy can cause to the partner (especially a female partner) of a nonmonogamous person (of either sex). My suggestion is that the self, especially the female self, is conventionally defined in terms of sexual partners. I present and reply to a possible objection to this explanation, and then discuss my theory's normative implications.
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  39. Is Monogamy Natural?D. S. Dowling - 1996 - South African Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):91-100.
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  40. Breaking the Barriers to Desire Polyamory, Polyfidelity and Non-Monogamy : New Approaches to Multiple Relationships.Kevin Lano & Claire Parry - 1995
  41. Anti-Monogamy: A Radical Challenge to Compulsory Heterosexuality.Becky Rosa - 1994 - In Gabriele Griffin (ed.), Stirring It: Challenges for Feminism. Taylor & Francis. pp. 107--120.
  42. They Two Shall Be One Monogamy in History and Religion.Susan Dowell - 1990
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  43. Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (224):215 - 227.
  44. Variation in Mate Fidelity in Monogamous Birds.Norman L. Ford - 1983 - In R. F. Johnston (ed.), Current Ornithology. Plenum Press. pp. 329--356.
  45. Monogamy: A Critique.John McMurtry - 1972 - The Monist 56 (4):587-599.
    Almost all of us have entered or will one day enter a specifically standardized form of monogamous marriage. This cultural requirement is so very basic to our existence that we accept it for most part as a kind of intractable given: dictated by the laws of God, Nature, Government and Good Sense all at once. Though it is perhaps unusual for a social practice to be so promiscuously underwritten, we generally find comfort rather than curiosity in this fact and seldom (...)
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  46. Monogamy: A Critique.John McMurtry - 1972 - The Monist 56 (4):587-599.
    Almost all of us have entered or will one day enter a specifically standardized form of monogamous marriage. This cultural requirement is so very basic to our existence that we accept it for most part as a kind of intractable given: dictated by the laws of God, Nature, Government and Good Sense all at once. Though it is perhaps unusual for a social practice to be so promiscuously underwritten, we generally find comfort rather than curiosity in this fact and seldom (...)
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  47. Absolute Monogamy: The Attitude of Women and War. [REVIEW]W. E. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):149-149.
    The different distribution of "sexual strength" throughout the female and male life-span, and the resulting social backlogs of unsatisfaction in older women and young men, are cited as natural conditions having as final upshots the inferior social status ascribed to women and the permanent tendency toward war. To break the constellation of sexual adaptations which aggravates the tendencies toward war, the author suggests the introduction of "more generosity" into sex, i.e., the discarding of absolutist sex ideology.--E. W.
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  48. Absolute Monogamy: The Attitude of Women and War.E. W. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):149-149.
    The different distribution of "sexual strength" throughout the female and male life-span, and the resulting social backlogs of unsatisfaction in older women and young men, are cited as natural conditions having as final upshots the inferior social status ascribed to women and the permanent tendency toward war. To break the constellation of sexual adaptations which aggravates the tendencies toward war, the author suggests the introduction of "more generosity" into sex, i.e., the discarding of absolutist sex ideology.--E. W.
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  49. The Reason for Monogamy.R. C. Blumer - 1934 - Achimota Press.
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  50. A Plea for Monogamy.Havelock Ellis - 1925 - The Eugenics Review 17 (3):184.
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