Related categories

50 found
Order:
  1. The Special-Obligations Challenge to More Open Borders.Arash Abizadeh - 2016 - In Sarah Fine & Lea Ypi (eds.), Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership. Oxford University Press.
    According to the special-obligations challenge to the justice argument for more open borders, immigration restrictions to wealthier polities are justified because of special obligations owed to disadvantaged compatriots. I interrogate this challenge by considering three types of ground for special obligations amongst compatriots. First, the social relations that come with shared residence, such as participation in a territorially bounded, mutually beneficial scheme of cooperation; having fundamental interests especially vulnerable to the state’s exercise of power; being subject to coercion by the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Global Egalitarianism.Chris Armstrong - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor.Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4. Identita v liberální politické teorii a dilema kosmopolitismu [Identity in Liberal Political Theory and the Cosmopolitan Dilemma].Sylvie Bláhová & Pavel Dufek - forthcoming - Filosoficky Casopis.
    V textu adresujeme otázku individuální identity a její místo – či spíše opomíjení – v současných diskusích o kosmopolitní extenzi liberalismu jakožto dominantní politické teorie. Ukazujeme, že při konzistentním důrazu na komplementaritu „vnitřní“ a „vnější“ identity člověka, která je liberalismu vlastní od samotných jeho počátků, se vyjevuje zásadní nedostatečnost liberálního kosmopolitního projektu, a to v podobě podceňování nezbytnosti jednoznačně určeného veřejného rámce, který bude srozumitelně fixovat a vynucovat liberální principy a hodnoty a umožní tak jejich realizaci v individuálních životech. Argumentujeme, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account.Gillian Brock - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Gillian Brock develops a model of global justice that takes seriously the moral equality of all human beings notwithstanding their legitimate diverse identifications and affiliations. She addresses concerns about implementing global justice, showing how we can move from theory to feasible public policy that makes progress toward global justice.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  6. Rethinking Remedial Responsibilities.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3):195-202.
    How should we determine which nations have a responsibility to remedy suffering elsewhere? The problem is pressing because, following David Miller, ‘[it] is morally intolerable if (remediable) suffering and deprivation are allowed to continue . . . where they exist we are morally bound to hold somebody (some person or collective agent) responsible for relieving them’. Miller offers a connection theory of remedial responsibilities in response to this problem, a theory he has been developing over the last decade. This theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Coercion, Justification, and Inequality: Defending Global Egalitarianism.Simon Caney - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (3):277-288.
    Michael Blake’s excellent book 'Justice and Foreign Policy' makes an important contribution to the ongoing debates about the kinds of values that should inform the foreign policy of liberal states. In this paper I evaluate his defence of the view that egalitarianism applies within the state but not globally. I discuss two arguments he gives for this claim - one appealing to the material preconditions of democracy and the other grounded in a duty to justify coercive power. I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Responding to Global Injustice: On the Right of Resistance.Simon Caney - 2015 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (1):51-73.
    Imagine that you are a farmer living in Kenya. Though you work hard to sell your produce to foreign markets you find yourself unable to do so because affluent countries subsidize their own farmers and erect barriers to trade, like tariffs, thereby undercutting you in the marketplace. As a consequence of their actions you languish in poverty despite your very best efforts. Or, imagine that you are a peasant whose livelihood depends on working in the fields in Indonesia and you (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  9. Humanity, Associations and Global Justice: A Defence of Humanity-Centred Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism.Simon Caney - 2011 - The Monist 94 (4):506-534.
    This paper defends an egalitarian conception of global justice against two kinds of criticism. Many who defend egalitarian principles of justice do so on the basis that all humans are part of a common 'association' of some kind. In this paper I defend the humanity-centred approach which holds that persons should be included within the scope of distributive justice simply because they are fellow human beings. The paper has four substantive sections - the first addresses Andrea Sangiovanni's reciprocity-based argument for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  10. Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged.Simon Caney - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
    Climate change poses grave threats to many people, including the most vulnerable. This prompts the question of who should bear the burden of combating ?dangerous? climate change. Many appeal to the Polluter Pays Principle. I argue that it should play an important role in any adequate analysis of the responsibility to combat climate change, but suggest that it suffers from three limitations and that it needs to be revised. I then consider the Ability to Pay Principle and consider four objections (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   32 citations  
  11. Cosmopolitan Justice and Institutional Design.Simon Caney - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (4):725-756.
    What kind of political systems should there be? In this paper I examine two competing principles of institutional design — an instrumental view, which maintains that one should design institutions so as to realize the most plausible conception of justice, and a democratic view, which maintains that one should design institutions so as to enable persons to participate in the decisions that impact their lives. I argue for a mixed view that combines these two principles. In the second stage of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  12. Cosmopolitan Justice, Rights, and Global Climate Change.Simon Caney - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 19 (2).
    The paper has the following structure. In Section I, I introduce some important methodological preliminaries by asking: How should one reason about global environmental justice in general and global climate change in particular? Section II introduces the key normative argument; it argues that global climate change damages some fundamental human interests and results in a state of affairs in which the rights of many are unprotected: as such it is unjust. Section III addresses the complexities that arise from the fact (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  13. Cosmopolitan Justice, Responsibility, and Global Climate Change.Simon Caney - 2005 - Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):747-775.
    It is widely recognized that changes are occurring to the earth’s climate and, further, that these changes threaten important human interests. This raises the question of who should bear the burdens of addressing global climate change. This paper aims to provide an answer to this question. To do so it focuses on the principle that those who cause the problem are morally responsible for solving it (the ‘polluterpays’ principle). It argues thatwhilethishasconsiderable appeal it cannot provide a complete account of who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  14. Cosmopolitanism, Democracy and Distributive Justice.Simon Caney - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy (sup1):29-63.
  15. Cosmopolitanism and the Law of Peoples.Simon Caney - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (1):95–123.
  16. Cosmopolitan Justice and Equalizing Opportunities.Simon Caney - 2001 - Metaphilosophy 32 (1-2):113-134.
    This paper defends a global principle of equality of opportunity, which states that it is unfair if some have worse opportunities because of their national or civic identity. It begins by outlining the reasoning underpinning this principle. It then considers three objections to global equality of opportunity. The first argues that global equality of opportunity is an inappropriate ideal given the great cultural diversity that exists in the world. The second maintains that equality of opportunity applies only to people who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  17. Cosmopolitanism.Fred Dallmayr - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (3):421-442.
    Barely a decade after the end of the Cold War, the fury of violence has been unleashed around the world, taking the form of terrorism, wars against terrorism, and genocidal mayhem. These developments stand in contrast to more hopeful legacies of the twentieth century: creation of the United Nations and adoption of international documents such as the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights." These legacies have encouraged a series of initiatives aiming at the formulation of a global or cosmopolitan ethics guiding (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  18. Reading, Implementing and Theorising Global Justice: On Some Recent Work in the Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism.Pavel Dufek - 2013 - Cosmopolis: A Review of Cosmopolitics 4 (4):84–98.
    In the last fifteen years or so, political philosophers have been increasingly busy nurturing their latest darling, global justice (hereinafter GJ). There are many reasons why justice, the centrepiece of much political theorising since the 1970s, has spilled beyond the confines of the (nation-)state – from certain inherent features of prominent philosophical accounts of justice to the seemingly morally arbitrary nature of state borders to the perceived or assumed effects of globalisation. In any case, the previously rather scattered reflections on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Why Strong Moral Cosmopolitanism Requires a World-State.Pavel Dufek - 2013 - International Theory 5 (2):177–212.
    The article deals with a pivotal conceptual distinction employed in philosophical discussions about global justice. Cosmopolitans claim that arguing from the perspective of moral cosmopolitanism does not necessarily entail defending a global coercive political authority, or a "world-state", and suggest that ambitious political and economic (social) goals implied in moral cosmopolitanism may be achieved via some kind of non-hierarchical, dispersed and/or decentralised institutional arrangements. I argue that insofar as moral cosmopolitans retain "strong" moral claims, this is an untenable position, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Pro Mundo Mori? The Problem of Cosmopolitan Motivation in War.Lior Erez - 2017 - Ethics & International Affairs 31 (2):143-165.
    This article presents a new understanding of the problem of cosmopolitan motivation in war, comparing it to the motivational critique of social justice cosmopolitanism. The problem of cosmopolitanism's “motivational gap” is best interpreted as a political one, not a meta-ethical or ethical one. That is, the salient issue is not whether an individual soldier is able to be motivated by cosmopolitan concerns, nor is it whether being motivated by cosmopolitanism would be too demanding. Rather, given considerations of legitimacy in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Cosmopolitanism, Motivation, and Normative Feasibility.Lior Erez - 2015 - Ethics and Global Politics 8 (1):43-55.
    David Axelsen has recently introduced a novel critique of the motivational argument against cosmopolitanism : even if it were the case that lack of motivation could serve as a normative constraint, people’s anti-cosmopolitan motivations cannot be seen as constraints on cosmopolitan duties as they are generated and reinforced by the state. This article argues that Axelsen 's argument misrepresents the nationalist motivational argument against cosmopolitanism : the nationalist motivational argument is best interpreted as an argument about normative feasibility rather than (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Rooted Cosmopolitanism. An Answer to Exclusion and Crime Against Humanity.Cheikh Mbacke Gueye - 2013 - Journal of East-West Thought 3 (2):45-56.
    Addressing the issue of crime against humanity requires a robust theory about personal attitude, politics, justice at home and abroad, as well as a true conception of human nature. The present paper contributes to this debate by emphasizing the importance of adopting a “rooted cosmopolitanism” that neither excludes wider loyalties, nor overrides the narrower ones. It is a theory that requires, not a world state, but solid democratic, and accountable states respectful of the rights of their citizens and the demands (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Habermas' Kierkegaard and the Nature of the Secular.Ada S. Jaarsma - 2010 - Constellations 17 (2):271-292.
    This article reconstructs Habermas’ normative program for the successful and mutually beneficial co-existence of the religious and the non-religious, looking especially at his reliance upon a particular translation of Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard himself wrote as a self-described Christian, or at least as someone invested in the possibilities of Christian existence, and so it is instructive to examine how Habermas, an admittedly non-religious thinker, renders Kierkegaard’s project. As I argue below, the specific ways in which Habermas employs Kierkegaard’s thought demonstrates what Habermas (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Human Rights and Moral Cosmopolitanism.Charles Jones - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):115-135.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Kant’s Cosmopolitan Patriotism.Pauline Kleingeld - 2003 - Kant-Studien 94 (3):299-316.
    Patriotism and cosmopolitanism are often presumed to be mutually exclusive, but Immanuel Kant defends both. Although he is best known for his moral and political cosmopolitanism, in several texts he defends the claim that we have a duty of patriotism, claiming that cosmopolitans ought to be patriotic. In this paper, I examine Kant’s different accounts of the duty of patriotism. I argue that Kant’s defense of nationalist patriotism fails, but that his argument for a duty of civic patriotism succeeds.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26. Arguing for Open Borders. [REVIEW]Andy Lamey - 2014 - Literary Review of Canada 22 (April):12-13.
    A review of The Ethics of Immigration, by Joseph Carens (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2012 - British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.
    Which of the two dominant arguments for duties to alleviate global poverty, supposing their premises were generally accepted, would be more likely to produce their desired outcome? I take Pogge's argument for obligations grounded in principles of justice, a "contribution" argument, and Campbell's argument for obligations grounded in principles of humanity, an "assistance" argument, to be prototypical. Were people to accept the premises of Campbell's argument, how likely would they be to support governmental reform in policies for international aid, or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Cosmopolitan Global Justice: Brock Vs. The Feasibility Sceptic.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2011 - Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric (4).
  29. Singer Revisited: Cosmopolitanism, Global Poverty and Our Ethical Requirements.G. Alexandre Lenferna - 2010 - South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2):85-94.
    A commonly held view is that giving to the poor is superogatory i.e., that while it is a good thing to do, it is not morally wrong for us not to do so. This essay sets out to show that for the affluent in the world giving to the poor is not superogatory but is rather a moral obligation. The paper critiques Singer's famous argument in ‘Famine, Affluence and Morality’ and finds that although the argument is a cogent and powerful (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Moral and Sentimental Cosmopolitanism.Graham Long - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):317-342.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31. Caring for Strangers: Can Partiality Support Cosmopolitanism?Pilar Lopez-Cantero - 2016 - Diacritica 30 (2):87-108.
    In their strife for designing a moral system where everyone is given equal consideration, cosmopolitan theorists have merely tolerated partiality as a necessary evil (insofar it means that we give priority to our kin opposite the distant needy). As a result, the cosmopolitan ideal has long departed from our moral psychologies and our social realities. Here I put forward partial cosmopolitanism as an alternative to save that obstacle. Instead of demanding impartial universal action, it requires from us that we are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Cosmopolitanism as a Moral Imperative.Jon Mahoney - 2002 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 9 (2):41-47.
    In this paper I consider and respond to two arguments against cosmopolitanism, the membership needs argument and the preferential treatment argument. I argue that if there are reasonable grounds for endorsing universal norms such as human rights, then there are no reasonable grounds for rejecting moral cosmopolitanism.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Does Cosmopolitan Justice Ever Require Restrictions on Migration?José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (2):175-186.
    In this essay, I argue that even when they appear to help, restrictions on migration are usually only an impediment, not an aid, to cosmopolitan justice. Even though some egalitarian cosmopolitans are well intentioned in their support of migration restrictions, I argue that migration restrictions are (i) not truly cosmopolitan and (ii) will not have the kinds of consequences they expect. My argument in defense of this claim begins, in section 1, by outlining a defense of migration restrictions based on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Cosmopolitanism.Kai Nielsen - 2005 - South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):273-288.
    This essay explicates and defends a version of moral cosmopolitanism. It builds on the work of Martha Nussbaum and Kwame Anthony Appiah, who in turn build on Cicero and Kant. It is an update in a contemporary idiom of a classical cosmopolitanism. In a time when Enlightenment ideas are widely discounted, it gives expression to an Enlightenment view arguing that there should be a fundamental allegiance to the ideal of a worldwide community of human beings where each human being, just (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. The Capabilities Approach and Ethical Cosmopolitanism: The Challenge of Political Liberalism1.Martha Nussbaum - 2011 - In Maria Rovisco & Magdalena Nowicka (eds.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Cosmopolitanism. Ashgate. pp. 403.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Civic and Cosmopolitan Justice.Onora O'Neill - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 2000, given by Onora O'Neill, a British philosopher.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Public Policy : Moving Toward Moral Cosmopolitanism.Gabriel Palmer-Fernández - 2009 - In John-Stewart Gordon (ed.), Morality and Justice: Reading Boylan's a Just Society. Lexington Books.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. The Educational Limits of Ethical Cosmopolitanism: Towards the Importance of Virtue in Cosmopolitan Education and Communities.Andrew Peterson - 2012 - British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (3):227-242.
    Cosmopolitanism has become an influential theory in both political and, increasingly, educational discourse. In simple terms cosmopolitanism can be understood as a response to the globalised and diverse world in which we live. Diverse in nature, cosmopolitan ideas come in many forms. The focus here is on what have been termed 'strong' ethical forms of cosmopolitanism; that is, positions which conceptualise moral bonds and obligations as resulting from a shared, common humanity. The view that pupils should be taught that all (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Thomas Pogge: World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms. [REVIEW]Roland Pierik - 2004 - The Leiden Journal of International Law 17 (3):631-635.
  40. Fairness to Non-Participants: A Case for a Practice-Independent Egalitarian Baseline.Merten Reglitz - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 20 (4): 466-485.
    Proponents of practice-dependent egalitarianism argue that egalitarian duties and entitlements only apply among participants in morally relevant practices. In this paper, I argue that these views are implausible because they allow for objectionable treatment of non-participants. I show that it is impossible, on the basis of practice-internal considerations alone, to determine the extent to which the pursuit of practices can permissibly limit the opportunities of non-participants. There are opportunities beyond the current holdings of practices to which no one has a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Human Rights and Liberal Toleration.David A. Reidy - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):287-317.
    Offers, by way of systematic reconstruction of Rawls's Law of Peoples, a principled view of human rights and liberal toleration.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42. Human Rights: Institutions and Agendas.David A. Reidy - 2008 - Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (4):409-433.
    Distinguishes and shows how one can coherently affirm distinct human rights agendas rooted in distinct conceptions of human rights, each with its own normative aim and institutional and discursive field of application.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. International Toleration: Rawlsian Versus Cosmopolitan.Kok-Chor Tan - 2005 - Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):685-710.
  44. Institutional Consequentialism and Global Governance.Attila Tanyi & András Miklós - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):279-297.
    Elsewhere we have responded to the so-called demandingness objection to consequentialism – that consequentialism is excessively demanding and is therefore unacceptable as a moral theory – by introducing the theoretical position we call institutional consequentialism. This is a consequentialist view that, however, requires institutional systems, and not individuals, to follow the consequentialist principle. In this paper, we first introduce and explain the theory of institutional consequentialism and the main reasons that support it. In the remainder of the paper, we turn (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Why Rawls is Not a Cosmopolitan Egalitarian.Leif Wenar - unknown
    In John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples we find unfamiliar concepts, surprising pronouncements, and what appear from a familiar Rawlsian perspective to be elementary errors in reasoning.1 Even Rawls’s most sensitive and sympathetic interpreters have registered unusually deep misgivings about the book.2 Most perplexing of all is the general character of the view that Rawls sets out to justify. For in this book Rawls, the twentieth century’s leading liberal egalitarian, advances a theory which shows no direct concern for individuals and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. Cosmopolitanism and Competition: Probing the Limits of Egalitarian Justice.David Wiens - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (1):91-124.
    This paper develops a novel competition criterion for evaluating institutional schemes. Roughly, this criterion says that one institutional scheme is normatively superior to another to the extent that the former would engender more widespread political competition than the latter. I show that this criterion should be endorsed by both global egalitarians and their statist rivals, as it follows from their common commitment to the moral equality of all persons. I illustrate the normative import of the competition criterion by exploring its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Enforcing the Global Economic Order, Violating the Rights of the Poor and Breaching Negative Duties? Pogge, Collective Agency and Global Poverty.Bill Wringe - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Thomas Pogge has argued, famously, that ‘we’ are violating the rights of the global poor insofar as we uphold an unjust international order which provides a legal and economic framework within which individuals and groups can and do deprive such individuals of their lives, liberty and property. I argue here that Pogge’s claim that we are violating a negative duty can only be made good on the basis of a substantive theory of collective action; and that it can only provide (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. From Global Collective Obligations to Institutional Obligations.Bill Wringe - 2014 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38 (1):171-186.
    According to Wringe 2006 we have good reasons for accepting the existence of Global Collective Obligations - in other words, collective obligations which fall on the world’s population as a whole. One such reason is that the existence of such obligations provides a plausible solution a problem which is sometimes thought to arise if we think that individuals have a right to have their basic needs satisfied. However, obligations of this sort would be of little interest – either theoretical or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Cosmopolitanism, Minimal Morality, and the World-State.Christopher C. Yorke - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:873-880.
    The similarities between the concept of cosmopolitanism and the concept of the world-state are, in some regards, fairly intuitive. At the very least, the theme of universalism is often seen as common to both. The precise form of a universalized ethical or political order, however, is not expressly conceptually determined by either cosmopolitanism or the world-state; both are susceptible to pluralist interpretations. Further, we cannot assume that an ethical concern will either motivate the creation of, or become a central policy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Etik och migration mellan verklighet och ideal: En analys av Joseph H. Carens’s The Ethics of Immigration. [REVIEW]Yuksekdag Yusuf - 2014 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 3:77-83.
    Den här rapporten analyserar kortfattat Joseph H. Carens senaste bok, The Ethics of immigration. Den inledande delen av dokumentet berör de grundläggande principerna från boken och hur Carens härleder sin utvärdering av olika immigrations och integrations principer från Ius Soli inom ett liberalt demokratiskt ramverk. Den andra delen behandlar bokens huvudsakliga metodologiska område, detta är den dualistiska strukturen Carens använder och hur den ska bli förstådd med hans givande bidrag. Slutligen kommer dokumentet undersöka den milda anti-cosmopolitan attityden Carens håller och (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography