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  1. Deception in Morality and Law.L. Alexander & E. Sherwin - 2003 - Law and Philosophy 22 (5):393-450.
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  2. Self and Other in Trust and Distrust. Judging About Trustworthiness.Gry Ardal - 2010 - In Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.), Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck.
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  3. Imwinkelried's Argument for Normative Ethical Testimony.David W. Barnes - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):234-241.
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  4. Practical Necessity and Personality.Katharina Bauer - 2016 - In Jonathan Webber & Alberto Masala (eds.), From Personality to Virtue. Essays in the Philosophy of Character. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 81-105.
    This paper argues that certain expressions of practical necessity – like ‘I have to do this, I do not have a choice’ or ‘Here I stand, I can do no other’ – allow an insight into deep structures of personality and self-understanding. They point at a limit where someone would have to ‘become another person’ (in his own view), if he was forced to an alternative decision, because of neglecting ground-projects and convictions, which are essential for his self-conception. This limit (...)
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  5. Menschenwürde und das Bedürfnis nach Respekt.Peter Baumann - 2003 - In Ralf Stoecker (ed.), Menschenwürde – Annäherungen an einen Begriff. öbv&hpt. pp. 19-34.
    Human dignity seems very important to us. At the same time, the concept ‘human dignity’ is extraordinarily elusive. A good way to approach the questions “What is it?” and “Why is it important?” is to raise another question first: In virtue of what do human beings have human dignity? Speciesism – the idea that human beings have a particular dignity because they are humans – does not seem very convincing. A better answer says that human beings have dignity because and (...)
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  6. Die Autonomie der Person.Peter Baumann - 2000 - mentis.
    This book offers a discussion of practical as well as theoretical autonomy.
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  7. Accountability and Intervening Agency: An Asymmetry Between Upstream and Downstream Actors.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2017 - Utilitas 29 (1):110-114.
    Suppose someone (P1) does something that is wrongful only in virtue of the risk that it will enable another person (P2) to commit a wrongdoing. Suppose further that P1’s conduct does indeed turn out to enable P2’s wrongdoing. The resulting wrong is agentially mediated: P1 is an enabling agent and P2 is an intervening agent. Whereas the literature on intervening agency focuses on whether P2’s status as an intervening agent makes P1’s conduct less bad, I turn this issue on its (...)
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  8. Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW]Lawrence C. Becker - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):173-.
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  9. Climate Change and Justice: A Non-Welfarist Treaty Negotiation Framework.Alyssa R. Bernstein - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):123-145.
    Obstacles to achieving a global climate treaty include disagreements about questions of justice raised by the UNFCCC's principle that countries should respond to climate change by taking cooperative action "in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities and their social and economic conditions". Aiming to circumvent such disagreements, Climate Change Justice authors Eric Posner and David Weisbach argue against shaping treaty proposals according to requirements of either distributive or corrective justice. The USA's climate envoy, Todd Stern, takes (...)
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  10. Marginal Cases and Moral Relevance.Mark Bernstein - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (4):523–539.
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  11. Trust but Verify.Sissela Bok - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):446-446.
    I agree with Dr Eyal that the ‘trust-promotion argument for informed consent’ fails to account for common sense intuitions about informed consent.1 Appealing to ‘social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions’ cannot, by itself, justify informed consent requirements. And stipulating, in the trust-promoting argument's first clause, that such trust is necessary is an invitation to abuse, in healthcare systems as much as in political systems. Those who are asked to give their informed consent to medical procedures have every (...)
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  12. Coleman's Hypothesis on Trusting Behaviour and a Remark on Meta‐Studies.Friedel Bolle & Jessica Kaehler - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (4):469-483.
    Coleman (1990) describes ?calculative trust?. He states that, in order to trust, the value of trust has to be larger than the value of mistrust. So if subjects have (not personally but on average) rational expectations about the trustworthiness of their transaction partners, we should expect the frequency of trust to increase with the average net profitability of trust. In a meta?study of trust experiments, Coleman's Hypothesis could not be confirmed while, in our own experiment with a wider parameter range, (...)
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  13. Apologies.Luc Bovens - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):219-239.
    There is a cognitive, an affective, a conative, and an attitudinal component to a genuine apology. In discussing these components, I address the following questions. Might apologies be due for non-culpable actions? Might apologies be due for choices in moral dilemmas? What is the link between sympathy, remorse and making amends? Is it meaningful for resilient akratics to apologize? How much moral renewal is required when one apologizes? Why should apologies be offered in a humble manner? And is there some (...)
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  14. Doing Away with Harm.Ben Bradley - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):390-412.
    I argue that extant accounts of harm all fail to account for important desiderata, and that we should therefore jettison the concept when doing moral philosophy.
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  15. Mill on the Harm in Not Voting: D. G. Brown.D. G. Brown - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (2):126-133.
    Christopher Miles Coope offers a letter, drafted by Helen Taylor but certified by Mill, in which Mill asserts the duty to vote, as evidence that he could not have regarded harmfulness to others as a necessary condition of moral wrongness. But it is clear that Mill regarded the duty to vote as one of imperfect obligation, and the wrongness of not fulfilling it as a matter roughly of not doing enough, in this case not doing one's fair share. He has (...)
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  16. More on Self-Enslavement and Paternalism in Mill: D. G. Brown.D. G. Brown - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):144-150.
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  17. Ethical Dilemmas of Sociability.Kimberley Brownlee - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (1):54-72.
    There is a tension between our need for associative control and our need for social connections. This tension creates ethical dilemmas that we can call each-we dilemmas of sociability. To resolve these dilemmas, we must prioritize either negative moral rights to dissociate or positive moral rights to social inclusion. This article shows that we must prioritize positive social rights. This has implications both for personal morality and for political theory. As persons, we must attend to each other's basic social needs. (...)
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  18. Moral Demands, Moral Pragmatics, and Being Good.Kimberley Brownlee - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (3):303-308.
    I point out an odd consequence of the role that broadly pragmatic considerations regularly play in determining moral demands. As a result of the way in which moral demands are formed, it turns out that people will frequently become morally good in a strange and rather dubious way. Because human beings are not very good, we will lower our moral demands and, as a result, most people will turn out, in an important sense, to be morally good. Our relative badness, (...)
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  19. Christ-Shaped Moral Philosophy and the Triviality of 20th Century 'Christian Ethics'.Harry Bunting - 2014 - Evangelical Philosophical Society: The Christ - Shaped Philosophy Project.
    Christian moral philosophy is a distinctive kind of moral philosophy owing to the special role it assigns to God in Christ. Much contemporary 'Christian ethics' focuses on semantic, modal, conceptual and epistemological issues. This may be helpful but it omits the distinctive focus of Christian moral philosophy: the human condition in a morally ordered universe and the redemptive work of jesus Christ as a response to that predicament. Christian moral philosophers should seek to remedy that neglect.
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  20. Moral Projection and the Intelligibility of Collective Forgiveness.Harry Bunting - 2009 - Yearbook of the Irish Philosophical Society 7:107 - 120.
    ABSTRACT. The paper explores the philosophical intelligibility of contemporary defences of collective political forgiveness against a background of sceptical doubt, both general and particular. Three genera sceptical arguments are examined: one challenges the idea that political collectives exist; another challenges the idea that moral agency can be projected upon political collectives; a final argument challenges the attribution of emotions, especially anger, to collectives. Each of these sceptical arguments is rebutted. At a more particular level, the contrasts between individual forgiveness and (...)
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  21. Political Forgiveness.Harry Bunting - 2009 - Ethics in Brief 14 (2):1 - 4.
    The paper attempts to clarify the concept of political forgiveness, distinguishing it from individual forgiveness and illustrating its presence in contemporary politics. It proceeds to explore grounds for criticism of political forgiveness - an authority criticism, a specificity criticism and a temporal distance criticism - and suggests that, although these difficulties can be overcome, they provide serious challenges to putative cases of political forgiveness.
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  22. Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham.J. H. Burns - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):209.
    My object in this paper is to suggest a few reflections on some themes in Bentham's work which others as well as I have noted, without perhaps developing them as fully as might with advantage be done. There will be nothing like full development in the limited compass of what is said here, but what is said may at least indicate possible directions for further exploration. The greater part of the paper will be concerned with the notion of natural authority; (...)
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  23. Sexual Difference as a Question of Ethics.Judith Butler - 2008 - Chiasmi International 10:333-347.
  24. The Effects of Deontological and Teleological Ethical Systems of Immediate Supervisors on Employee Trust.Craig B. Caldwell, Brian Pfanschmidt & Burdeane Orris - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:1-11.
    This research seeks to extend the literature of trust by examining whether the amount of trust that employees have in their supervisors is contingent upon the ethical system of belief utilized by their immediate supervisors. To help answer this question, it is hypothesized that employees have a greater degree of trust in immediate supervisors practicing the deontological ethical system of belief than in those practicing the teleological ethical system of belief. This study begins the search for the moral frameworks that (...)
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  25. Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing.Cheshire Calhoun - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (4):819-823.
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  26. On Mercy.Claudia Card - 1972 - Philosophical Review 81 (2):182-207.
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  27. Why Moral Expertise Needs Moral Theory.Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In Jamie Carlin Watson & Laura Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Moral Expertise: New Essays from Theoretical and Clinical Bioethics. Springer International Publishing. pp. 71-86.
    Discussions of the nature or possibility of moral expertise have largely proceeded in atheoretical terms, with little attention paid to whether moral expertise depends on theoretical knowledge of morality. Here I argue that moral expertise is more theory-dependent than is commonly recognized: Moral expertise consists, at least in part, in knowledge of the correct or best moral theory, and second, that knowledge of moral theory is essential to moral experts dispensing expert counsel to non-experts. Moral experts would not be moral (...)
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  28. “Relational Views of Ethical Obligation in Wittgenstein, Lévinas and Løgstrup”.Anne-Marie Soendergaard Christensen - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (1):15-38.
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  29. Can We Trust Robots?Mark Coeckelbergh - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):53-60.
    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is articulated, which provides a way of thinking about trust that puts less emphasis on individual choice and control than the contractarian-individualist approach. In addition, the argument is made that while robots are neither human (...)
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  30. Trust and the Trickster Problem.Zac Cogley - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (1):30-47.
    In this paper, I articulate and defend a conception of trust that solves what I call “the trickster problem.” The problem results from the fact that many accounts of trust treat it similar to, or identical with, relying on someone’s good will. But a trickster could rely on your good will to get you to go along with his scheme, without trusting you to do so. Recent philosophical accounts of trust aim to characterize what it is for one person to (...)
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  31. Modern Moral Problems.J. D. Conway - 1961 - Notre Dame, Ind., Fides Publishers.
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  32. Brian Barry, Why Social Justice Matters (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005), Pp. VII + 311.Shane D. Courtland - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (4):522-524.
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  33. Un capítulo de la crítica de la razón afectiva. El análisis de las disposiciones de ánimo según Alexander Pfänder.Mariano Crespo - 2009 - Pensamiento 65 (245):413-431.
    : El análisis de las disposiciones de ánimo (Gesinnungen) ofrecido por Alexander Pfänder constituye un primer capítulo de lo que se podría denominar “fenomenología de la conciencia emotiva” o “crítica de la razón afectiva”. Este fenomenólogo de la primera hora ofrece un detallado examen fenomenológico de este tipo especial de vivencias intentando, al mismo tiempo, mostrar su relevancia moral. Este trabajo pretende enmarcar y reconstruir dicho análisis en el marco de un intento más general de insistencia en la importancia que (...)
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  34. Das Verzeihen Eine Philosophische Untersuchung.Mariano Crespo - 2002 - Heidelberg, Germany: Carl Winter Verlag.
    Was heißt das eigentlich und im Grunde genommen, einer anderen Person zu verzeihen? Was ist der Gegenstand des Verzeihens? Oder anders gesagt, was verzeihen wir überhaupt, wenn wir verzeihen? Welche Voraussetzungen müssen erfüllt sein, damit ein Gegenstand des Verzeihens überhaupt zur Gegebenheit kommen kann? Was sind die charakteristischen Merkmale dieses besonderen Gegenstandes? Was für eine Art von Erlebnis ist das Verzeihen? Handelt es sich um einen Akt oder um eine Stellungnahme? Können wir im Namen anderer Personen verzeihen? Ist das Verzeihen (...)
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  35. Andrew Mason (Ed.), Ideals on Equality.J. de Wispelaere - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):243-247.
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  36. No Way Around Consent: A Reply to Rubenfeld on 'Rape-by-Deception'.Tom Dougherty - 2013 - Yale Jaw Journal Online 123:321-333.
  37. Sex, Lies, and Consent.Tom Dougherty - 2013 - Ethics 123 (4):717-744.
    How wrong is it to deceive someone into sex by lying, say, about one's profession? The answer is seriously wrong when the liar's actual profession would be a deal breaker for the victim of the deception: this deception vitiates the victim's sexual consent, and it is seriously wrong to have sex with someone while lacking his or her consent.
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  38. Human Enhancement and Supra-Personal Moral Status.Thomas Douglas - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (3):473-497.
    Several authors have speculated that (1) the pharmaceutical, genetic or other technological enhancement of human mental capacities could result in the creation of beings with greater moral status than persons, and (2) the creation of such beings would harm ordinary, unenhanced humans, perhaps by reducing their immunity to permissible harm. These claims have been taken to ground moral objections to the unrestrained pursuit of human enhancement. In recent work, Allen Buchanan responds to these objections by questioning both (1) and (2). (...)
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  39. Intertemporal Disagreement and Empirical Slippery Slope Arguments.Thomas Douglas - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (2):184-197.
    One prevalent type of slippery slope argument has the following form: (1) by doing some initial act now, we will bring it about that we subsequently do some more extreme version of this act, and (2) we should not bring it about that we do this further act, therefore (3) we should not do the initial act. Such arguments are frequently regarded as mistaken, often on the grounds that they rely on speculative or insufficiently strong empirical premises. In this article (...)
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  40. Rational Choice and Trust.Keith Dowding - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):207-220.
  41. Morally Speaking.Gerald Dworkin - 2000 - In Edna Ullmann-Margalit (ed.), Reasoning Practically. Oxford University Press. pp. 182--188.
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  42. Intention, Foreseeability, and Responsibility.Gerald Dworkin - 1987 - In F. Schoeman (ed.), Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 338--354.
    A defense of the principle of double-effect.
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  43. Introduction.Heather Dyke - 2003 - In Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1--7.
    Ethics seeks answers to questions about the moral status of human actions and human lives. What should I do, and what should I not do? What sort of life should I lead? Actions and lives are temporal things. Actions are performed at certain times, are informed by past events and have consequences for the future. Lives have temporal extension, and are experienced from a sequence of temporal perspectives. Thus, one would think that answers to ethical questions should take account some (...)
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  44. Distributive Justice and Freedom: Cohen on Money and Labour.Cécile Fabre - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):393-412.
    In his recent Rescuing Justice and Equality, G. A. Cohen mounts a sustained critique of coerced labour, against the background of a radical egalitarian conception of distributive justice. In this article, I argue that Cohenian egalitarians are committed to holding the talented under a moral duty to choose socially useful work for the sake of the less fortunate. As I also show, Cohen's arguments against coerced labour fail, particularly in the light of his commitment to coercive taxation. In the course (...)
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  45. Against Body Exceptionalism: A Reply to Eyal.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2):246-248.
    It is hard to do justice, in a short reply, to Eyal's excellent review. Accordingly, I will focus on what I take to be its central claim – namely that I fail to give proper consideration to the extent to which the forced extraction of body parts undermines individuals' opportunities for self-respect. According to Eyal, ‘body exceptionalism’ can be defended on the following grounds: ‘People usually see trespass into a person and into objects they associate with a person – especially (...)
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  46. Is the Body Special? Review of Cecile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2).
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  47. Justice and the Compulsory Taking of Live Body Parts.Cécile Fabre - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):127.
    This paper argues that, if one thinks that the needy have a right to the material resources they need in order to lead decent lives, one must be committed, in some cases, to conferring on the sick a right that the healthy give them some of the body parts they need to lead such a life. I then assess two objections against that view, to wit: to confer on the sick a right to the live body parts of the healthy (...)
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  48. Action and Responsibility.Joel Feinberg - 1965 - In Max Black (ed.), Philosophy in America. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. pp. 134--160.
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  49. Ethics, Trust, and the Professions.Albert Flores - 1994 - Teaching Philosophy 17 (2):177-179.
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  50. Competing with Integrity.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:285-285.
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